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    I want to start a fine art degree this year, however my parents are completely against it. My dad says it is a complete waste of time because I won't get a job out of it. Obviously I understand where he is coming from.

    He would only allow me to study art if it was at oxford. I did get an interview for oxford last year but got rejected after this. I was thinking of reapplying this year but I may just get rejected again.

    I do have one offer for Fine Art and Art History at Kingston, but my dad does not want me to accept because Kingston used to be a polytechnic. I got A*A*A at A Level, so he wants me to go somewhere with higher entrance requirements than Kingston. I am still waiting to hear from Brighton, I was rejected from my other three choices.

    Basically he wants me to study anything that isn't art. He's suggested things like Law, Theology, Psychology...i think many subjects could be interesting but really I can't see myself doing anything other than art.

    My dad is just really controlling and always has been, my parents patronise me alot, saying that I would not be able to cope with going away to university.

    95% of the time i want to do art but there is a bit of me that worries about what I will do at the end of it. I don't know whether to take my parents advice and do a more 'constructive' degree as this may be a better idea in the long run.
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    In a way, I guess your dad is looking out for you. It may seem that he is being harsh on you, but think about it. The world is becoming a harsher and harsher place - if people with more "useful" degrees are struggling to find jobs, then why would any prospective employer consider giving someone with a "less useful" degree, a job?
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    Do exactly what you love, but just bear in mind you might have to do your share of menial jobs to fill the financial gaps around your painting which is, as your father will agree, more of a hobby.

    Really though, do what you want. I'm sick of the primary motivation being money and career. Money may help, but the 'successful insurance broker' version of yourself will always wonder what the fine artist version might have achieved.

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    (Original post by The_Dragonborn)
    In a way, I guess your dad is looking out for you. It may seem that he is being harsh on you, but think about it. The world is becoming a harsher and harsher place - if people with more "useful" degrees are struggling to find jobs, then why would any prospective employer consider giving someone with a "less useful" degree, a job?
    I know he just wants what is best for me, but even if i did a better respected degree it wouldn't guarentee me a job.

    I was hoping to work as an art conservationist, because obviously I can't assume I'll make money from art. It's a job that you need a qualified person to do, and they'll always be needed. But i think you need an art related degree to do this anyway, because you can only do conservation at master's level.

    I just feel like it's my life and not my dad's. He always talks about things in relation to how other people will see them.
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    (Original post by swrath)
    I know he just wants what is best for me, but even if i did a better respected degree it wouldn't guarentee me a job.

    I was hoping to work as an art conservationist, because obviously I can't assume I'll make money from art. It's a job that you need a qualified person to do, and they'll always be needed. But i think you need an art related degree to do this anyway, because you can only do conservation at master's level.

    I just feel like it's my life and not my dad's. He always talks about things in relation to how other people will see them.

    Meh, do it then.
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    (Original post by swrath)
    I was hoping to work as an art conservationist, because obviously I can't assume I'll make money from art. It's a job that you need a qualified person to do, and they'll always be needed. But i think you need an art related degree to do this anyway, because you can only do conservation at master's level.
    I suggest you think very carefully about what you want to do and weigh it up with real world factors.

    In my circumstance, ideally I wanted to be a video editor for the film industry but I weighed the practicality’s of it and looked into what are my chances of actually getting a job out of it. Obviously these are very slim and often poorly paid with super long hours so I shifted my focus on what subjects I was good at and looked at jobs that combined my interest and abilities into one so I chose to get into web design & development which are very much in demand and now that I have recently graduated I am very happy I made this choice as the job hunt didn’t last long.

    I didn’t want to come out with a degree and find myself in no good position to actually get a job. That would be terrible especially for new grads paying triple the amount of tuition fees. Many just pick a degree there interested in and worry about the job hunt when they graduate. This isn’t being smart. People who do this often end up doing a job completely irrelevant to their degree because they’ve essentially given up looking for ... job.

    The message here is the world is all about compromise. You have to weigh up and combine your abilities and interests with the professions in demand in the job market to survive in this beaten economy.

    On another note, my dad is a 3rd gen Art Restorer. This profession is a specialist job so the jobs are VERY phew and far between. Although he has managed to survive all these years, he says it’s a dying trade and doesn’t get the big heavily funded restoration projects like he used to. He isn’t rich and income I'm sure is below the average household. A degree for this will barely help at all because like most jobs you need to have real world commercial experience.

    My suggestion is that you look into becoming a digital creative and after a number of years will be able to become a user experience expert or an art director. Both are paid well and are creative roles. Although even these jobs are somewhat difficult to find as a graduate you can easily get your foot in the door if you do a placement or an internship. The digital industry is surpassing the print industry which is why most print designers become web designers now (even though they are not the same thing).
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    Think of it this way: no degree guarantees you a job. Your father doesn't know that going to a uni with higher entrance requirements is going to increase your chances of getting a job, nor does he know that you doing a course you don't particularly have an interest in is going to get you a good degree classification. He's making a lot of assumptions and forgetting that it's entirely your decision and your future. Sure, jobs in art are quite few and far between at the moment, but plenty of graduate jobs don't specify a particular degree subject.

    I'd say go for Art at Kingston if that's what you'd like to do; I can speak for Psychology when I say that it definitely isn't a course someone should pick on a whim, lots of people do it and realise it's a lot tougher than they first think. I'm not saying you couldn't hack it, far from it with your grades but don't pick something just because someone suggested it to you.
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    (Original post by swrath)
    I want to start a fine art degree this year, however my parents are completely against it. My dad says it is a complete waste of time because I won't get a job out of it. Obviously I understand where he is coming from.

    He would only allow me to study art if it was at oxford. I did get an interview for oxford last year but got rejected after this. I was thinking of reapplying this year but I may just get rejected again.

    I do have one offer for Fine Art and Art History at Kingston, but my dad does not want me to accept because Kingston used to be a polytechnic. I got A*A*A at A Level, so he wants me to go somewhere with higher entrance requirements than Kingston. I am still waiting to hear from Brighton, I was rejected from my other three choices.

    Basically he wants me to study anything that isn't art. He's suggested things like Law, Theology, Psychology...i think many subjects could be interesting but really I can't see myself doing anything other than art.

    My dad is just really controlling and always has been, my parents patronise me alot, saying that I would not be able to cope with going away to university.

    95% of the time i want to do art but there is a bit of me that worries about what I will do at the end of it. I don't know whether to take my parents advice and do a more 'constructive' degree as this may be a better idea in the long run.
    If only you could talk to the dozens of pals I have that got a fine art degree and are now unemployed or working in restaurants.
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    (Original post by rjm101)
    I didn’t want to come out with a degree and find myself in no good position to actually get a job. That would be terrible especially for new grads paying triple the amount of tuition fees. Many just pick a degree there interested in and worry about the job hunt when they graduate.
    I did this and now I'm on the verge of graduating and really worried about jobs. I know it seems far off now but it'll role around and three years accumalting a huge pile of debt just to do something interesting won't seem so worth it then.

    On the other hand, don't go to university and study something you're not interested at all. It's just that yeah, maybe you need to compromise a bit between what interests you and what you're likely to get a job in. Have you considered doing a combined honours degree? Perhaps studying art in combination with a language could be useful as it would give you an actual skill as well?
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    Richard Dyson's dual cyclone vaccuum cleaner was the blue sky thinking of a designer, not an engineer. We have to have visionaries. Maybe you are a visionary and we need your vision to help our grey lives to be enriched, and maybe on the way, you may get lucky and invent something?
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    Depends how talented you are, if you're average, avoid it because all that debt for a pointless future. If you do one of the subject above like you stated, you can always do art as a side thing, a hobby. Average artists don't really figure much these days in the job market, it's all going digital. Digital art like graphic design might be more useful than fine arts.
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    (Original post by deadwing)
    I did this and now I'm on the verge of graduating and really worried about jobs. I know it seems far off now but it'll role around and three years accumalting a huge pile of debt just to do something interesting won't seem so worth it then.

    On the other hand, don't go to university and study something you're not interested at all. It's just that yeah, maybe you need to compromise a bit between what interests you and what you're likely to get a job in. Have you considered doing a combined honours degree? Perhaps studying art in combination with a language could be useful as it would give you an actual skill as well?
    It really helps if you did internships during the summer. I did a placement year which helped a lot but now that Ive recently graduated from uni I think doing a summer internship would had helped me out even more. I didnt have trouble finding jobs but having done a placement for a year and if I had a summer internship I think would had given me a little more edge.

    I agree that you shouldn't pick something your not interesting in. Your interests and potential job prospects after graduating need to align. It cant be just about what interests you and it cant be just about the demand for a particular job. If you combine both you should have no trouble finding a job and becoming a success!

    As you are near graduating I suggest you go look for an internship immediately after. Or a little bit before graduation as theres normally a gap between the ceremony and exams because other graduates will often start to look after graduation so start the search early. It will make you look keen to start work too. If you have no commericial experiance it is likely that you cant expect to fill a permanent role with a salary and should look for internships instead.
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    Skills is the new currency sooner or later, art is a skill but not one that can get you some serious moolah.
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    (Original post by Willbean)
    Skills is the new currency sooner or later, art is a skill but not one that can get you some serious moolah.
    Unless you're a master of self promotion and are "connected" of course.
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    Study what you want; but know that your employment prospects will likely suffer if you choose something that graduates of which are not in demand.
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    You can study/do your own art in your spare time. If you're going to go to university, do something with better prospects, in my opinion. If you're not interested in studying anything else, don't go to university/take a year out to decide.
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    Why don't you reapply for fine art at a 'better' uni. I know UCL do it. Get experience of different things over your gap year and consider what you may want to do after your graduate.
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    (Original post by Waterstorm)
    Why don't you reapply for fine art at a 'better' uni. I know UCL do it. Get experience of different things over your gap year and consider what you may want to do after your graduate.
    i did apply for ucl, but was rejected at the portfolio review stage. it's extremely difficult to get a place there because there's over 1000 applicants for not many places.

    i'm conflicted over whether i should do art at a uni with a good overall reputation, or one with a good repuation for art. kingston and brighton are both ranked 6th for art but probably aren't so high up for everything else.

    i'm not sure whether to just go to kingston or brighton in september and then reapply for oxford this year.
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    (Original post by swrath)
    i did apply for ucl, but was rejected at the portfolio review stage. it's extremely difficult to get a place there because there's over 1000 applicants for not many places.

    i'm conflicted over whether i should do art at a uni with a good overall reputation, or one with a good repuation for art. kingston and brighton are both ranked 6th for art but probably aren't so high up for everything else.

    i'm not sure whether to just go to kingston or brighton in september and then reapply for oxford this year.
    You have to consider what you will do with an art degree. At your stage, you probably won't be considering it so much and probably think you'll work something out during your time at uni. But when you hit final year, that's when you'll realise how important it is - just like others have said in this thread. And we're all saying this as current uni students.

    I would recommend you not do an art degree at kingston/brighton, especially with your grades, I don't see what you can get out of it. Look at UCL's new course called Arts and Sciences, it looks quite good and it's a mixture of loads of different courses (something like that, I haven't looked into it in a lot of detail). Look at other courses you can do which may have some art involved but is 'less useless' as you call it. Make sure you'll be interested in it though, I'm sure you'll find something.
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    I can understand where your dad is coming from, in this day and age with tuition fees at the highest they've ever been you need to make sure that your degree will be worth it. You don't really want to be leaving uni thousands of pounds in debt with a degree that won't get you a job. But really, it's up to you, if you love art and you can't see yourself doing anything else, then go for it. But if you have doubts, have a look at other more "useful" courses and see if there's one that grabs you. Perhaps something that's related or maybe a dual honours course?
 
 
 
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