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    Margaret Thatcher is said to be a Methodist.

    She said 'There is no such thing as society', that there are individuals and families.'It's our duty to look after ourselves and then, also to look after our neighbour'.

    This is muddled thinking.

    Why would it be our duty to look after our neighbour if our neighbour, also going along with the idea that 'There is no such thing as society', might have an entirely different outlook to us and therefore might not care about us themselves?

    What constitutes a neighbour? Just whoever happens to physically live next door to you? Or the kind but distressed looking person you see a few streets away?

    Is there any religion apart from Buddhist types - and the Gordon Gecko idea of 'Greed is good' that downplays society?

    'We are all part of the same body' says Christianity. Christianity says that Jesus sacrificed his body for our sake. Doesn't it make far more sense, if you are a Christian, to see this as a metaphor for a kind of socialism? That some cogs may be bigger in the machine/body of society, but all of the cogs are just as valuable as each other to the working of the machine/body?

    But what Thatcher essentially said was that the machine of society may work most of the time (apart from union strikes) but it is unnecessarily big and that it should be stripped of what is inessential and redesigned.

    But what she , I would say psychotically, refused to accept is that it is not human nature for a cog, brought up and educated in one way e.g. to be a miner, to change itself in to a different shape - to no longer feel supported, not monetarily but emotionally, by the state - and to have to become, in effect, its own self supporting machine.

    It would have been far more honest of her if, in saying that there is no society, she had dismantled all aspects of society altogether including the NHS. But, leaving it in a middle ground as she did only confuses the issue.

    And what is the consequence of the idea 'There is no such thing as society'?
    If you're working class and practically entrepreunarial you might make more money than you previously did. But if you're working class and 'merely' intelligent then she was not going to restore the grammar schools (originally cut back by Labour) to help you out. The opportunity might still be there in theory but the gap between the experiences of a clever state school comprehensive kid and the experiences of a public school educated kid
    were a throwback to a much earlier time, regardless of which university they both happened to go to.

    The effect is that she crippled the notion of the good, honest, clever, working class (some of whom died in the cages of Hillsborough) and made the vast majority want to become either middle class by hook or by crook or join the ranks of the unemployed (unemployment being encouraged by Thatcherism more than costly and unprofitable industries).

    What truly religious person would rather have some people unemployed for most of their natural lives, in no fit shape to face God?

    Thus the portion who chose to become middle class look down on the lower portions (unemployed or not) when it was actually a political ideology that was responsible for some of this shift. So think of that a little bit when you attack people who you regard to be Chavs. Their families have probably been betrayed and they are your penalty for the decline of the honest working class.
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    (Original post by Picnic1)
    'We are all part of the same body' says Christianity. Christianity says that Jesus sacrificed his body for our sake. Doesn't it make far more sense, if you are a Christian, to see this as a metaphor for a kind of socialism? That some cogs may be bigger in the machine/body of society, but all of the cogs are just as valuable as each other to the working of the machine/body?

    What truly religious person would rather have some people unemployed for most of their natural lives, in no fit shape to face God?
    If you're referring to 1 Corinthians 12: 12-14: "12 Just as a body, though one, has many parts, so it is with Christ. 13 For we were all baptized by one Spirit so as to form one body - whether Jews or Gentiles, slave or free - and we were all given the one Spirit to drink. 14 Even so the body is not made up of one part but of many." (NIV), then this passage is saying all those who follow Jesus are one body - not everyone in society.

    Furthermore, no-one is fit to meet God on their own merits - whether or not they have had a job. Certainly, low unemployment is important, and efforts should be made to reduce unemployment. However, having a job won't prepare you to face God any better than not having one.
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    Talk about having to stretch to make your point.
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    Individualists almost unanimously support the notion of family, yet are unperturbed that families are microcosms of socialism.
 
 
 
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