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    Hello, I thought I'd make a big university information thread to make it easier for people to decide. If we could make information under the following categories for each university then I'll edit the thread consequently.

    • Course Structure- How is it taught (practicals, lectures, other).
    • How clinically oriented is the course in a) first years and b) last years.
    • Extra expenses of the course they don't tell you to begin with.
    • Typical day- contact hours, how many practicals with a module.
    • Generic negatives about the vet school.
    • Strong positives about the vet school.
    • Exam structure- does the course negatively mark? What is a typical exam format?
    • How much guidance do you get through vet school on a) work experience placements b) modules
    • Other



    If everyone from other vet schools can help me compile this it'd be brilliant. Obviously only include information about clinical years if you know about clinical years...

    thanks.
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    As someone really struggling to decide between RVC & Liverpool for vetmed, a thread like this would be seriously helpful and so appreciated! D:
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    (Original post by AriesHamburger)
    As someone really struggling to decide between RVC & Liverpool for vetmed, a thread like this would be seriously helpful and so appreciated! D:
    I can do the bit for Liverpool soon
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    All hail Nottingham!

    • Course Structure- How is it taught (practicals, lectures, other).
      3 practicals a week - each timetabled at 3- 4 hours long
      Somewhere between 9 and 13 lectures a week
      3 hours of clinical self directed learnings - working through a case as a group
      The rest of the time is self directed learnings - working through tasks as a group - usually reaffirming lecture material with some more detail - they're very good
    • How clinically oriented is the course in a) first years and b) last years.
      The most clinical of all the courses - we look at the animal with a clinical focus from the beginning of the course. We go over the animal in body systems - starting with the Musculoskeletal system, moving through the cardiorespiratory system, the GU tract etc. This covers the first 2 years.
      Third year starts of with a research project for the first term - a kind of mini Phd. The rest of third year is a mixture of practical skills and many other things!
      4th year - revist all the body systems of the first 2 years and go over conditions and their treatments etc
      5th year - clinical rotations
    • Extra expenses of the course they don't tell you to begin with.
      Theres a compulsory list of equipment that needs to be bought - I personally didnt buy any of the recommended books - I bought/ buy what I need when I need it
    • Typical day- contact hours, how many practicals with a module.
      9-5 Mon, Tues, Thurs and Fri. 9 - 1 on Wed. The rest is said above!
    • Generic negatives about the vet school.
      We're half an hour from Nottingham - but it is a free bus in.
      Half an hour from Loughborough - cheap bus though
      If you want to go out, you can - you need to get a taxi back though (costs about a 5er each)
    • Strong positives about the vet school.
      WHATS THERE NOT TOO LIKE Seriously though.... theres no negatives!
    • Exam structure- does the course negatively mark? What is a typical exam format?
      No negative marking. Usually 1 or 2 multiple choice question papers. And then SPOT tests - short answer papers. OSPEs - 10 station practical exam at the end of the year
    • How much guidance do you get through vet school on a) work experience placements - you find your placement and organise dates, you then hand in a piece of paper and the EMS office organise the paperwork

      b) modules - help is there if you need it!
    • Other Nottingham is awesome!!!
      If theres anything I've missed, please tell me/ ask me!
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    Bump... I'd really like for this thread to take off once exams etc are out of the way, assuming that's why people haven't posted in it very much. It would be a fantastic resource.
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    THE ROYAL (****) SCHOOL OF VETERINARY STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

    This is my input as a first year student and based on my experiences so far.

    Course structure
    Lectures are 50 minutes each and on average we have 2-3 a day, sometimes more. They are complemented by practicals, including dissections for anatomy and lab work for cell biology, bacteriology and immunology.There are usually at least 2 practicals per week. There are also practicals for farm animal handling - the university has its own dairy farm with 250 cattle about 2 miles from the vet school and its own sheep farm on campus. We also have teaching horses for the horse handling sessions. For pigs we go to a farm a few miles away. The course is not very tutorial-heavy - at most you can expect one tutorial every 3-4 weeks.

    Running alongside the sciencey/animal husbandry stuff is the Professional and Clinical Skills course, where you learn about the basics of a clinical examination, intro to drug calculations etc.

    The course structure is quite traditional, with years 1 and 2 being the pre-clinical years, and years 3-5 being the clinical years. Final year is lecture-free. Contrast to the likes of Nottingham which is quite practical from day 1.

    Extra expenses
    When you have accepted your unconditional offer, they will send you a list of compulsory and optional clothing, books and other equipment. These can be ordered through the vet school. To the best of my memory there were no unexpected expenses when we started the course.

    Typical day
    I touched on this briefly in the first section, but a typical day is usually 2 or 3 lectures in the morning, each lasting 50 minutes, and possibly a practical lasting 2 hours. There are usually at least 2 practicals per week. Occasionally there may be no teaching scheduled, which is always welcome respite! Wednesday afternoons are normally kept free although this is similar to most UK universities.

    Positives
    -The vet school was established in 1823, making it the second oldest in the UK after the RVC and therefore has built a very strong reputation for producing the vets of tomorrow.
    -The Easter Bush campus is home to a brand new £42 million teaching building, superb small animal hospital, large animal and equine hospital, veterinary oncology centre and the Roslin Institute, one of the leading animal science research centres in the world. Edinburgh is also the only UK vet school with dedicated exotic animal facilities within the small animal hospital.
    -We are taught by some of the best and most respected researchers in their field.
    -The BVM&S degree is accredited by the RCVS, AVMA and EAEVE so **** Vet graduates are found all over the world.
    -Agree with them or not, in the 2013 Guardian subject league tables, Edinburgh is ranked 2nd best vet school in the UK behind Cambridge. The University of Edinburgh is also one of the most prestigious in the UK, ranking at around 10th in the UK and 21st in the world (QS World Rankings 2012).
    -The city of Edinburgh is a beautiful place and there is so much to do. As far as cities go it's not enormous either, and you can walk pretty much anywhere.

    There was a series on Animal Planet a couple of years ago called 'Vet School' - full episodes are available to watch on the vet school website. It shows the work of the vets and specialists in all 3 hospitals.

    Negatives
    There really are, in my opinion, no negatives. But of course I would say that! The only thing that *may* put some people off is the commute to the vet school each day - it takes 30 mins on the bus from the city centre, but it's definitely worth it. Up until 2011, all of the pre-clinical teaching (years 1 and 2) used to take place in the city centre, but the site (Summerhall) was becoming rather out of date and crowded and the decision was made to move everything 8 miles out of the city to Easter Bush.

    Exam structure
    We are assessed through traditional written exams (short answer and multiple choice), oral exams and coursework. For anatomy we have spot exams. There is no negative marking, so you should always make an educated guess!

    Organising EMS
    For pre-clinical or animal husbandry EMS (AHEMS), there is a directory for lots of different placement types where students have been before. If you are really struggling to find somewhere, they will help you, but you are expected to organise all of your EMS yourself. You also have to fill in a form at the end of your placement which contains questions assessing how much you have learnt on the placement.

    The breakdown for requirements of AHEMS is:
    2 weeks cattle (at least 1 week of which must be dairy cattle)
    2 weeks sheep (at least 1 week of which must be lambing)
    2 weeks horses
    1 week pigs
    1 week poultry
    1 week kennels and cattery (if just one of cats or dogs, experience of the other species should be gained during the 2 weeks free choice)
    1 week small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs etc.)
    2 weeks free choice
    Visit to a livestock market (1/2 a day)

    Hope that covers everything. You may want to look at the vet school website for more details on entry requirements, course structure, open days etc. http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/vet
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    THE ROYAL VETERINARY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

    (Sorry for the huge amount I've written, hopefully it's useful!!)

    • Course Structure- How is it taught (practicals, lectures, other).
    The course is taught in strands – gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, locomotion etc. This means that you cover everything relevant to that strand at the time it is taught – so gross structure, histology, physiology etc. Rather than having a module of, for example, histology where you cover everything for that at one time. Personally I find the strand method really logical and easy to follow, it also makes good clinical sense.

    The first term of first year is a very quick overview of all the strands/systems. This helps to bring everyone up to the same starting point and is a good reminder of things (particulary if you have had a gap year/time out!) Then over the rest of first year and second year you cover every strand in more details, different amounts of time are spent on each strand depending on how complex it is. All strands are taught in a variety of ways – lectures, dissections, histology/microscope sessions, directed learnings, ISFs etc. Directed learning sessions are in groups of 5/6/7 people and tend to have a more clinical focus on things – it might be designing worming protocols for a farm, looking at an ECG trace etc. ISF stands for integrated structure and function – these are practical sessions with the live animals (cow, horse and dog) and involve you working with a lecturer in small groups (again 5/6/7) to cover the key points for that strand – so for cardiovascular, where you auscultate the heart, where the key venepuncture sites are located and how to find them etc. So that pretty much covers first and second year, you also do parasitology and pathology during this time. Dotted around at various points during first and second year you also have various animal handling sessions, which are at Hawkshead. There are also some large animal dissection classes, a sheep and a pony, horses legs etc.

    Third year is the start of clinical teaching. All the strands are revisited again, this time from a clinical point of view, so the medical conditions, surgeries etc relating to them. This means it all slots into place well with the way you were taught in the first two years. Teaching is similar again, lectures and directed learnings, with practical classes with animals at various points. You also have lectures once a week on the veterinary principles type things – suture types and materials, aseptic technique etc.

    A really fun part of third year are the clinical skills sessions, these are in the clinical skills centre (the staff there are amazing!) It is where you get taught how to scrub, gown, glove, suture, anaesthetic machines and so on. You sessions where you are taught each skill, but then the centre is open each day so you can go in and practice whenever you want – which is really useful before EMS and before each rotation starts.

    Teaching of the clinical strands runs through third year and includes the first term of fourth year (pre Christmas). Then in January of 4th year there are some recap sessions before 4th years start rotations in the February. Rotations then run for a year, with most people finishing their last bits of EMS around Easter of final year. Then it is a final bit of electives teaching (on the areas you have chosen to do) before exams.

    • How clinically oriented is the course in a) first years and b) last years.
    Year one and two are “pre-clinical.” Although directed learning sessions tend to be a bit more clinical and you cover pathology and parasitology which are both more clinical modules. The focus is on the normal/healthy animal. But you still get plenty of hands of with dissection classes, animal handling classes etc.

    Third year gets very clinical – lectures are totally clinically based. You start your clinical skills teaching and your first EMS block at easter.

    • Extra expenses of the course they don't tell you to begin with.
    You get sent a list of things needed for the start of the course - the usual, wellies, boiler suit, waterproofs, lab coat, stethoscope. So none of it is stuff that you don't get told out, but it does begin to add up a bit!

    In clinical years you will need scrubs and extra equipment, also clothes for placements – smart trousers and shirts, casual clothes for equine/farm placements. Travel costs for placements, depending how close to home you can get them (these tends to be particularly for farm placements). Books – best to get them out the library unless you find any that you really like!

    It’s going to be pretty much the same for any vet school, the clothing and equipment costs do add up, but they should last you for the duration of the course (and beyond!)

    • Typical day- contact hours, how many practicals with a module.

    I’ve sort of talked about this in the first section. Trying to remember…in first year, generally a couple of hours of lectures in the morning then something in the afternoon – a practical or a directed learning session. So you are in pretty much every day for most of the day, sometimes a later start or earlier finish. But you do normally have a couple of hours spare at some point to do some work on your own – if you are organised!

    • Generic negatives about the vet school.

    -Depending what you like – the first two years are based in London. Some people hate this, really depends on your POV. I’m not a huge city fan, but I actually quite enjoyed the chance to live in the capital for a bit and experience life there!
    -The RVC only does vet courses – again, depends what you like, some people find that claustrophobic, other people really like that.

    • Strong positives about the vet school.

    -Oldest vet school in the UK – we’ve been producing great vets since 1791, RVC knows what it is doing!!
    -We are the only vet school in the world to be accredited by the RCVS, AVMA, AVBC and EEAVE. So if you are thinking about working abroad, the RVC will open up lots of countries for you! But even if you don’t want to work abroad, it shows how well the RVC course is set up to be able to accredited by so many boards!
    -Again, we only do vet courses, which can be a positive! It means we do one thing, and do it well! You get to mix with plenty of your future colleagues. You don’t have to explain to your housemates the stress of a vet course, you can help each other!
    -You get the best of both worlds – sometime in London to enjoy all that offers. But also time in Hawkshead – which is a bit more rural, if that suits you, but not too isolated (really easy to get back into London) if you want that.
    -The QMH (where you will spend time on rotations) is a fantastic, world class facility. Which means you will be learning skills from highly qualified nurses and vets.
    -Great social life – Freshers week (including the infamous beerdrinking), Christmas ball, RAG week, Sports ball, May ball, Final Year Revue and plenty of other events during the year. Bars on both campuses.
    -We are part of the University of London, so if/when you do want to meet more non vets, you can join their clubs/societies, go to their bar etc.
    -Erm…basically the RVC is just fantastic 

    • Exam structure- does the course negatively mark? What is a typical exam format?
    First and second year: Very small MCQ before Christmas and Easter (worth 5%). Main exams are in the summer (June), with short answer, long answer, MCQs, ISF (oral exam) and spot papers (specimens to label etc). Short animal husbandry research project due in before the end of 2nd year. I think there are also a couple of other small essays, but I can’t remember!

    Third year: Animal handling exam at the beginning of third year. The rest of the exams are after easter (normally beginning of May) – one MCQ and one EMQ (extended matching questions) paper.

    Fourth year: Exams are before Christmas. One written paper on a Friday – with some research work over the weekend for a second paper on the Monday. Also an EMQ and an MCQ paper.

    Final year: Need to have passed all your rotations and submitted your research project. Main exams are spring/summer. OSCE (practical exam). Plus written papers (not quite sure how many!)

    The exams aren’t negatively marked. You generally need to pass each exam with a minimum of 40%, but need to get an average of 50% across combinations of the papers to pass. Sounds complicated, but it generally seems to work out pretty fair.

    • How much guidance do you get through vet school on a) work experience placements b) modules
    AHEMS (animal husbandry placements)
    12 weeks to be completed in first two years:
    2 weeks lambing, 2 weeks dairy, 2 weeks pigs, 2 weeks equine, 4 weeks free choice.

    You need to ensure that the placement meets the requirements for the number of animals required for each species, but other than that you can go where you want. So if you have been somewhere before that you like, you can return there. You organise your placements yourself (so you can make sure you go somewhere you can get to etc!) There is a good database online though with 100s of places listed that you can contact – people are encouraged to add feedback about the placements they have been to, so it is getting to be more useful each year. You then submit a form to the registry office, who then deal with the paperwork.

    Clinical EMS
    26 weeks to be completed in final three years.
    10 weeks to be done in third year, the other 16 between fourth and final year.
    There are some requirements regarding number of weeks in the same place/different places/abroad etc. But it is generally pretty easy to ensure you get to focus on what you want. Again, you arrange the places yourself, but there is a useful database online.
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    This thread is a great idea!

    I can't add anything yet but I'll add stuff about Bristol after I have been there a while, if no one else has posted by then. I still may post anyway as the course is changing this year so it might still be useful.
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    (Original post by Eevee13)
    This thread is a great idea!

    I can't add anything yet but I'll add stuff about Bristol after I have been there a while, if no one else has posted by then. I still may post anyway as the course is changing this year so it might still be useful.
    In what way is it changing? Is it a complete re-structure or just a few changes?
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    (Original post by Cetacea)
    In what way is it changing? Is it a complete re-structure or just a few changes?
    Complete restructure from what I gathered from the interview day and from snooping about looking at the units, comparing between the years. I was keeping my eye on unit descriptors as previously grads have been able to be exempt from some units if they had covered stuff before, but now due to the new structure it is not possible (not that I mind!). Don't know much about it at the moment but it sounds exciting! From the unit description it sounds like one change is that they might be teaching anatomy via systems instead of the old way by region, but don't quote me on that.
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    (Original post by Eevee13)
    Complete restructure from what I gathered from the interview day and from snooping about looking at the units, comparing between the years. I was keeping my eye on unit descriptors as previously grads have been able to be exempt from some units if they had covered stuff before, but now due to the new structure it is not possible (not that I mind!). Don't know much about it at the moment but it sounds exciting! From the unit description it sounds like one change is that they might be teaching anatomy via systems instead of the old way by region, but don't quote me on that.
    That's interesting. I too had heard that graduates could be exempt from certain units. It would be interesting to see whether students prefer to be taught anatomy by system or region. At Edinburgh it's region-based so I wouldn't really know any different.
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    Came across this again looking for something else and thought it was worth bumping. People will be putting applications in soon and I'm sure would appreciate the info
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    Can any one give some info on Glasgow? :confused:

    I'd love to know how the program there is structured and well pretty much anything else really
 
 
 
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