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    So, i got conditional offers , for biomedical science and other for radiography course. The fact is , I just cannot decide which course is better and more prospective? What is more, I heard that job as a radiographer is very hard and stressful, but the salary for them in nhs are the same. And I think studying a radiogrpahy is very hard, am I right?
    Thanks for advice.
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    I'm going to be studying Biomedical Science in September. I think it has a lot of things going for is, particularly the fact that it's a very broad degree which covers a very wide range of modules, meaning it would be a great degree to lead onto further, more specialised studies.
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    Im doing Biomedical science but I think you should go into radiography because its vocational! What are you planning to do with biomedical sciences? if you are going to become a biomedical scientist is your degree accredited?

    you can't really say biomedical sciences is harder, all degrees have its hard and easy parts. can you see yourself working in a lab or working as a radiographer? hmm maybe that's a bit harsh. Im in my final year of biomedical sciences not accredited and its hard because there is so much to revise for and memorise and regurgitate essays in the exam. Im am really frustrated with how it is taught I have not learnt any useful skills, its just been exam practice and how to get the best marks by memorising essays for lectures in case they come up in the finals....maybe Im not supposed to be doing a degree and just get a job, but you can't get a decent job without a degree.

    but i digress, why did you apply for both? How did you get offers from different degree programmes?
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    (Original post by LIzzieWoo)
    Im doing Biomedical science but I think you should go into radiography because its vocational! What are you planning to do with biomedical sciences? if you are going to become a biomedical scientist is your degree accredited?

    you can't really say biomedical sciences is harder, all degrees have its hard and easy parts. can you see yourself working in a lab or working as a radiographer? hmm maybe that's a bit harsh. Im in my final year of biomedical sciences not accredited and its hard because there is so much to revise for and memorise and regurgitate essays in the exam. Im am really frustrated with how it is taught I have not learnt any useful skills, its just been exam practice and how to get the best marks by memorising essays for lectures in case they come up in the finals....maybe Im not supposed to be doing a degree and just get a job, but you can't get a decent job without a degree.

    but i digress, why did you apply for both? How did you get offers from different degree programmes?
    You know, I applied for both because I was not sure what I want to study. You can always apply to similar degress, you just have to point that out in you Personal St. I have read many reviews and people say that studying radiography is veery hard, because it is close to being to something like a doctor. Yes, my course is accredited and I plan to work in the nhs. You can work as a biom scientist in other places if your course is not accredited so don't be frustrated really. Can I ask what uni do you study at and is there more biology or chemistry in that course?
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    (Original post by sevda1994)
    You know, I applied for both because I was not sure what I want to study. You can always apply to similar degress, you just have to point that out in you Personal St. I have read many reviews and people say that studying radiography is veery hard, because it is close to being to something like a doctor. Yes, my course is accredited and I plan to work in the nhs. You can work as a biom scientist in other places if your course is not accredited so don't be frustrated really. Can I ask what uni do you study at and is there more biology or chemistry in that course?
    I dropped radiography to study biomedical science. The reason I dropped radiography is because it wasnt challenging enough. It was literally just learning anatomy and how to position a patient for an X-ray. There was some quantum physics to study but this wasn't applied during clinical placement as exposure levels for different anatomical areas were pre-programmed into the X-ray equipment.

    Biomedical science is definitely a lot more difficult - in my opinion!! (With a massive range of career opportunities)

    Just to note that to practice under the title "biomedical scientist" anywhere in the UK, you must be HCPC registered. That involves having an IBMS approved degree and certificate of competence.

    I have completed a clinical placement for the IBMS registration portfolio and I am currently wrapping up the final year of my degree in biomedical science. If you have any questions I am happy to answer them and direct you to good sources of information.
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    (Original post by BLineDisaster)
    I dropped radiography to study biomedical science. The reason I dropped radiography is because it wasnt challenging enough. It was literally just learning anatomy and how to position a patient for an X-ray. There was some quantum physics to study but this wasn't applied during clinical placement as exposure levels for different anatomical areas were pre-programmed into the X-ray equipment.

    Biomedical science is definitely a lot more difficult - in my opinion!! (With a massive range of career opportunities)

    Just to note that to practice under the title "biomedical scientist" anywhere in the UK, you must be HCPC registered. That involves having an IBMS approved degree and certificate of competence.

    I have completed a clinical placement for the IBMS registration portfolio and I am currently wrapping up the final year of my degree in biomedical science. If you have any questions I am happy to answer them and direct you to good sources of information.
    Thank you for your advice. I think I've decided to study biomed science now :rolleyes: . I think it is more interesting than radiography, isn't it? And one question , is there more biology or chemistry on the course? And is chemistry difficult at uni on this course?
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    (Original post by sevda1994)
    Thank you for your advice. I think I've decided to study biomed science now :rolleyes: . I think it is more interesting than radiography, isn't it? And one question , is there more biology or chemistry on the course? And is chemistry difficult at uni on this course?
    There's more biology. Modules differ between universities. The most difficult chemistry is probably general lab stuff, like calculating dilution concentrations etc.

    You'll be studying areas including: physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, cellular pathology (histology and cytology), immunology, haematology and molecular cell biology.
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    I did biomedical science and I recommend that you go for radiography.

    1. Vocational course
    2. NHS funded
    3. Good foundation for a good career path
    4. Get to work with people (not just samples)
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    (Original post by BLineDisaster)
    There's more biology. Modules differ between universities. The most difficult chemistry is probably general lab stuff, like calculating dilution concentrations etc.

    You'll be studying areas including: physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, cellular pathology (histology and cytology), immunology, haematology and molecular cell biology.
    Yes, I do believe the accredited is more structured like this. I go to UCL and its completely up to you which modules to take but the one thing is lack of labs. at my uni my average contact per day is about 3 hours of lectures someones I only need to turn up to 2 days a week, then it is up to you to do the extra reading. I have friends doing the accredited version and it is 9-5; lectures in the morning and labs in the afternoon. I have done no labs since 2nd year cos it depends on what modules you chose, if they have a practical side to it or not. I have had about 4 essays per term, while the accredited one is about 10 or so assignments.
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    (Original post by brahinmanc)
    I did biomedical science and I recommend that you go for radiography.

    1. Vocational course
    2. NHS funded
    3. Good foundation for a good career path
    4. Get to work with people (not just samples)

    I guess you did the unaccredited version?
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    (Original post by LIzzieWoo)
    Yes, I do believe the accredited is more structured like this. I go to UCL and its completely up to you which modules to take but the one thing is lack of labs. at my uni my average contact per day is about 3 hours of lectures someones I only need to turn up to 2 days a week, then it is up to you to do the extra reading. I have friends doing the accredited version and it is 9-5; lectures in the morning and labs in the afternoon. I have done no labs since 2nd year cos it depends on what modules you chose, if they have a practical side to it or not. I have had about 4 essays per term, while the accredited one is about 10 or so assignments.
    Really, at UCL? I thought they were one of the top biomed courses in the UK? The workload for me is crazy, in my final year, I have had 9 assignments so far. Currently I am finishing off the practical work for my final year project, which has to be written up in the next 2 weeks, then I have a 3000 word biotech assignment then I have 3 exams starting 14th may!

    So much work, I can't wait to finish and cram 4 years of mental and physical torture into one night of drinking.
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    I get this all the time. Its a contradiction, you know, I thought that if I get into a top uni, then Im on a top course, granted I should have done my research into the course before applying. All the Russell unis, apart from QMUL and Durham are not accredited so the fact that they have Biomedical Science to offer is misleading it should really be called a degree in 'life sciences'. Basically majority of the lecturers here are researchers so they are in the 'top of their field' to use the term loosely. Many of the lecturers are more into research than teaching, there are plenty of very good lecturers here that are engaging etc but majority are there to research and teaching is part of their contract, so you get some people just reading out from the slides. aside from that I spoke to the course organiser and they said they dont offer the accredited because it too restrictive you are only taught lab skills and the sole purpose of the accredited degree is that they train you to become a lab technician and run tests, perform PCRs day in day out, just paraphrasing what he said. UCL wants to produce more researchers and pursuade people to pursue PhDs so there is greater freedom in choosing modules you enjoy which means it woud not meet the requirements of IBMS. therefore there is more self-study time, so I do feel completely cheated, I might as well read all the papers on my own in my own time and sit the exam and still do just as well without paying to do something I can do by myself.


    Wow that sounds great, I finished 21st of march, we get 5 weeks to revise for 4 exams. Does that mean you need to look for sponsorship with IBMS for your official training? good luck with your assignments.
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    (Original post by LIzzieWoo)
    I get this all the time. Its a contradiction, you know, I thought that if I get into a top uni, then Im on a top course, granted I should have done my research into the course before applying. All the Russell unis, apart from QMUL and Durham are not accredited so the fact that they have Biomedical Science to offer is misleading it should really be called a degree in 'life sciences'. Basically majority of the lecturers here are researchers so they are in the 'top of their field' to use the term loosely. Many of the lecturers are more into research than teaching, there are plenty of very good lecturers here that are engaging etc but majority are there to research and teaching is part of their contract, so you get some people just reading out from the slides. aside from that I spoke to the course organiser and they said they dont offer the accredited because it too restrictive you are only taught lab skills and the sole purpose of the accredited degree is that they train you to become a lab technician and run tests, perform PCRs day in day out, just paraphrasing what he said. UCL wants to produce more researchers and pursuade people to pursue PhDs so there is greater freedom in choosing modules you enjoy which means it woud not meet the requirements of IBMS. therefore there is more self-study time, so I do feel completely cheated, I might as well read all the papers on my own in my own time and sit the exam and still do just as well without paying to do something I can do by myself.


    Wow that sounds great, I finished 21st of march, we get 5 weeks to revise for 4 exams. Does that mean you need to look for sponsorship with IBMS for your official training? good luck with your assignments.
    Your lecturer is a bit misinformed. The beauty of studying an accredited course is getting a year of laboratory experience and the added option of working in the NHS (I actually successfully interviewed for a phd before deciding NHS was better for me), a lot of my cohort actually have med school offers too!

    My training was funded £19000 by the Welsh Assembly Gvernment and it was part of the degree, so I didn't have to seek sponsorship. Thanks I can't wait to finish, my exams finish on May 28th and that should coinside with the start date for the job I have been offered in e NHS in clinical biochemistry.

    Edit: I should note that if you are interested in working in the NHS you can pay the IBMS to verify your degree and they will recommend what top-up modules you need to gain accreditation, then you'd need to find a trainee post which is incredibly difficult. A lot of people on that route work as medical laboratory assistants for months on end until a training post becomes available.
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    (Original post by LIzzieWoo)
    I guess you did the unaccredited version?
    Of course, who would aspire to work in an NHS lab?! :no:
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    (Original post by brahinmanc)
    Of course, who would aspire to work in an NHS lab?! :no:
    What's wrong with working in an NHS lab? Contributing to the 80% of diagnosis made on the work of biomedical scientists? As opposed to trying (and probably failing) to get onto an incredibly competitive postgrad medicine or dentistry course, or doing a PhD and entering a job market swamped with PhD's and ending up with a postdoc distant from your original field?

    I know a guy with a PhD in chemical engineering who is working a £15k p.a. job doing basic colourimetric enzyme assays!

    I think the accredited courses are more beneficial, because you have all those job opportunities plus the option to go into the NHS.
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    (Original post by BLineDisaster)
    What's wrong with working in an NHS lab?
    Labs are boring and make you feel isolated.
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    (Original post by brahinmanc)
    Labs are boring and make you feel isolated.
    Fair enough, that's your opinion. I disagree completely, given the huge teamwork aspect involved in working in an NHS lab.

    I know a few people who feel that way, some of them felt like it before even applying to study life sciences, which I find trivial, and others just have bad experiences of uni labs - the chaos in rushing to find a lab coat that fits, find a bench with your friends, queuing to use the more limited equipment (e..g centrifuge, homogeniser)
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    (Original post by BLineDisaster)
    Fair enough, that's your opinion. I disagree completely, given the huge teamwork aspect involved in working in an NHS lab.

    I know a few people who feel that way, some of them felt like it before even applying to study life sciences, which I find trivial, and others just have bad experiences of uni labs - the chaos in rushing to find a lab coat that fits, find a bench with your friends, queuing to use the more limited equipment (e..g centrifuge, homogeniser)
    I've actually worked in a lab and I didn't like it at all; found it isolated and a tad boring. Much preferred working on the wards and interacting with different types of people. Of course we need BMS though, good luck with it! The people I spoke to who worked in the clin path seemed very enthusiastic about their lab work, each to their own eh!
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    (Original post by brahinmanc)
    I've actually worked in a lab and I didn't like it at all; found it isolated and a tad boring. Much preferred working on the wards and interacting with different types of people. Of course we need BMS though, good with with it! The people I spoke to who worked in the clin path seemed very enthusiastic about their lab work, each to their own eh!
    Yes, no one lab is the same! It all depends on who you work with, size of the department etc, so many variables! So I take it that you're a medic/going to study medicine? I was quite the opposite, like any man/woman of science I considered studying medicine, but I enjoyed the scientific side of things, rather than providing treatment.
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    (Original post by BLineDisaster)
    Yes, no one lab is the same! It all depends on who you work with, size of the department etc, so many variables! So I take it that you're a medic/going to study medicine? I was quite the opposite, like any man/woman of science I considered studying medicine, but I enjoyed the scientific side of things, rather than providing treatment.
    I applied for dentistry post-BMS, however failed to get a successful offer. Which university are you at?
 
 
 
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