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    Hello all,

    I'm in GCSE year so I don't need to make these decisions yet, but I'm wondering whether it would be beneficial for me to study in the USA.
    I would like to study medicine, I've secured some work experience and my Dad's a doctor so I'm pretty confident it is what I want to do. My predicted gcse grades are mainly a*s (6/10) and I'm going to be doing biology, chemistry, maths and RS next year for AS.

    I'm interested in studying in the USA because:
    - I would like to explore a different culture to my own.
    - Some the of universities out there are very good.
    - I am interested in living out there for part of my life, although I have not visited the country.
    - It looks pretty ****ing cool.

    However, I have doubts that:
    - My view of the USA is based very much off the internet, and so I am not sure whether my impressions of the country are romanticized.
    - High tuition f££s

    Thanks for reading, I'd appreciate your thoughts, especially if you yourself or someone you know has made the move out there.
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    Not much to contribute here, but I hope you're aware that, to study medicine in the USA, you need to finish four years of undergraduate study where you also need to meet the pre-medical school course requirements and obtain a bachelor's degree (anything really but often it's something like biology). I'm not 100% certain if the bachelor's has to be done in the US but I assume it does.
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    (Original post by Jack Jackson)
    Hello all,

    I'm in GCSE year so I don't need to make these decisions yet, but I'm wondering whether it would be beneficial for me to study in the USA.
    I would like to study medicine, I've secured some work experience and my Dad's a doctor so I'm pretty confident it is what I want to do. My predicted gcse grades are mainly a*s (6/10) and I'm going to be doing biology, chemistry, maths and RS next year for AS.

    I'm interested in studying in the USA because:
    - I would like to explore a different culture to my own.
    - Some the of universities out there are very good.
    - I am interested in living out there for part of my life, although I have not visited the country.
    - It looks pretty ****ing cool.

    However, I have doubts that:
    - My view of the USA is based very much off the internet, and so I am not sure whether my impressions of the country are romanticized.

    - High tuition f££s

    Thanks for reading, I'd appreciate your thoughts, especially if you yourself or someone you know has made the move out there.
    well I think you're pretty safe if you're smart enough to realise that...

    just repeating what the other guy said: you must have an undergraduate degree first before applying for medical school in the US. The degree subject does not have to be medically related (or even scientifically).

    You are right to think about the fees first. Tuition for foreign students is costly but I don't know too much in this area; you'll have to visit university/college websites to find out more.

    Also if you are certain you want to apply for university in the US, then you need to start preparing....well....now talk to your careers advisor at school first, they should have a lot of information about SATs and admissions etc.
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    Thanks for your thoughts, I'll speak to the careers advice guy at my school when we get back!
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    Do you do much in terms of extra curricular activities? For most of the top US unis, you need to be an awesome all-rounder - this is mainly as they want to see what you can contribute to their institution. You also need to study a range of subjects at undergrad level, not just one (although you do specialise in what you major, you'll have a number of minor subjects also).

    What's said above is right - you need an undergrad degree first. Furthermore, it costs a hell of a lot unless you qualify for generous scholarship. It isn't impossible though - I know a number of people, both in person and on TSR who have been successful both in terms of costs and actually gaining admission.
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    Hi, I've looked into this myself.

    Essentially the best choice is to study where you want to practice in the future as training in one country and transferring to work in another is costly and very time consuming. The BMA 'Working abroad' web page explains this all very clearly. To expand on what the others have said the bachelors degree required for US schools must include specific classes. An undergraduate degree in the US is more like school than it is over here in that students still take classes in a variety of subjects and certain classes must be taken (e.g. Organic chemistry) to be eligible for US med school.

    If it helps I've decide that I shall obtain my medicine degree in the UK. If when I'm older, I decide I want to work in the US, I'll proceed with the transfer process. I'm not certain enough to commit to the US at the minute. I should warn you even if you graduated from a US med school and complete residency, it can still be difficult to obtain a H1 visa to work there afterwards (while studying you will have a J1 visa).

    Hope this helps.


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    Oh and I recommend a visit! May I suggest you visit the towns/cities of the US colleges you may be interested in as these will give you a good impression of everyday life should you go to college in America


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    (Original post by Jack Jackson)
    Hello all,

    I'm in GCSE year so I don't need to make these decisions yet, but I'm wondering whether it would be beneficial for me to study in the USA.
    I would like to study medicine, I've secured some work experience and my Dad's a doctor so I'm pretty confident it is what I want to do. My predicted gcse grades are mainly a*s (6/10) and I'm going to be doing biology, chemistry, maths and RS next year for AS.

    I'm interested in studying in the USA because:
    - I would like to explore a different culture to my own.
    - Some the of universities out there are very good.
    - I am interested in living out there for part of my life, although I have not visited the country.
    - It looks pretty ****ing cool.

    However, I have doubts that:
    - My view of the USA is based very much off the internet, and so I am not sure whether my impressions of the country are romanticized.
    - High tuition f££s

    Thanks for reading, I'd appreciate your thoughts, especially if you yourself or someone you know has made the move out there.
    In the USA Medicine is a postgraduate course, which means that you need to do an undergraduate degree before hand, preferably in a scientific field. In addition to this, US Medical Schools favour home-applicants, although some do accept a tiny amount of international applicants. Some Universities, such as MIT and Harvard offer need-blind admission, which means that asking for financial aid doesn't prejudice your application, but most other universities aren't need blind for internationals.

    In all honesty, unless you can secure financial aid, I don't think it is worth it, especially if you want to become a doctor.
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    (Original post by Jack Jackson)
    Thanks for your thoughts, I'll speak to the careers advice guy at my school when we get back!
    Bruv, its not worth doing. I had a look at it a last years when I was in the same position wanting to do medicine. Here are the reasons:
    1. The USA is not as good as it looks being outside
    2. Most UK unis are far better, both cost wise and degree wise
    3. The UK is the best country to do medicine in, a lot of people move here to do medicine from the US and Canada
    4. Get the degree from here then you can move out to any country you want as our degrees are recognised and respected worldwide
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    (Original post by Mo_maths)
    Bruv, its not worth doing. I had a look at it a last years when I was in the same position wanting to do medicine. Here are the reasons:
    1. The USA is not as good as it looks being outside
    2. Most UK unis are far better, both cost wise and degree wise
    3. The UK is the best country to do medicine in, a lot of people move here to do medicine from the US and Canada
    4. Get the degree from here then you can move out to any country you want as our degrees are recognised and respected worldwide
    It's not that simple. If he wishes to transfer to Canada or the US he'll have to do another set of exams. It appears the North Americans don't respect a UK degree quite so much.


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    (Original post by Jack Jackson)
    Thanks for your thoughts, I'll speak to the careers advice guy at my school when we get back!
    just found out some new info about fees

    for example for Harvard students, if parents earn $50,000 - $150,000 they pay 10% of their income (not sure if this is gross or net - didn't say:confused:)

    if parents earn under $45,000 then you are awarded a full 100% reimbursement
 
 
 
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