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How do people know what they want to do with life so early? watch

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    I genuinely envy people like that. They know early on they want to be a doctor, teacher, actor, nurse and so on. When I think about it, I mean really think about it, I have no clue. I'm studying a science degree, though I find science interesting, I'm not passionate about it, chances are I won't be working in a related field cause chilling in a lab all day long isn't my cup of tea.

    I don't like the idea of working 9-5 in an office all day. Just living for a the weekend and 25days worth of holidays a year. I like the idea of meeting people, building bridges, travelling to different destinations, something I can immerse myself. But I'm not particularly talented or skilled at anything, like I don't act, dance, sing or what ever. Nor do I feel particularly passionate about anything at this point in time. I dunno I guess I'm just venting really.

    If you know what you want to do in life, how did you decide? If you don't know, what are you doing in the mean time? How does one go about finding what they really want to do in life if they have no clue?
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    A lot of people who had it figured out at a young age actually end up having a crisis. They don't get into med school or they realise that teaching is not for them. When people are so set on something, can't imagine doing anything else and never consider any other career path, it can be hugely distressing for them if they realise that for whatever reason this job they had in mind is not suitable. And the distress that comes from that is arguably worse than what comes from not knowing what you want to do.

    I think a lot of young people are way too quick to dismiss the 9-5 office job, deeming it boring, too conventional. Well, yes, some office jobs are boring. But then others can be hugely inspiring. You say you're a people person. Look for a job in a charity or social enterprise. Most jobs have some office element anyway, and you cannot expect to find your job exciting all the time. 25 days of holiday is actually quite generous - if you wanted to you could take that all in one go and go somewhere exciting for five weeks. You also forget that when you're working, your free time is actually free time. There are no essays or assignments hanging over you. Having less free time makes you really appreciate what you do get off. I graduated last year, am working full time - and this is by no means my dream job - and if I am honest, I am happier than I was as a student. It might be difficult during an economic crisis, but getting a job that you enjoy, or enjoy for the most part - is in my opinion a key part in finding happiness.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I genuinely envy people like that. They know early on they want to be a doctor, teacher, actor, nurse and so on. When I think about it, I mean really think about it, I have no clue. I'm studying a science degree, though I find science interesting, I'm not passionate about it, chances are I won't be working in a related field cause chilling in a lab all day long isn't my cup of tea.

    I don't like the idea of working 9-5 in an office all day. Just living for a the weekend and 25days worth of holidays a year. I like the idea of meeting people, building bridges, travelling to different destinations, something I can immerse myself. But I'm not particularly talented or skilled at anything, like I don't act, dance, sing or what ever. Nor do I feel particularly passionate about anything at this point in time. I dunno I guess I'm just venting really.

    If you know what you want to do in life, how did you decide? If you don't know, what are you doing in the mean time? How does one go about finding what they really want to do in life if they have no clue?
    Both my parents are doctors, so I guess I might have been greatly influenced by them.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I genuinely envy people like that. They know early on they want to be a doctor, teacher, actor, nurse and so on. When I think about it, I mean really think about it, I have no clue. I'm studying a science degree, though I find science interesting, I'm not passionate about it, chances are I won't be working in a related field cause chilling in a lab all day long isn't my cup of tea.

    I don't like the idea of working 9-5 in an office all day. Just living for a the weekend and 25days worth of holidays a year. I like the idea of meeting people, building bridges, travelling to different destinations, something I can immerse myself. But I'm not particularly talented or skilled at anything, like I don't act, dance, sing or what ever. Nor do I feel particularly passionate about anything at this point in time. I dunno I guess I'm just venting really.

    If you know what you want to do in life, how did you decide? If you don't know, what are you doing in the mean time? How does one go about finding what they really want to do in life if they have no clue?
    I always loved art and have some talent for it as well as years of practice but because of family pressures and fear of failure (being a starving unemployed artist) I ended up going into accounting of all things...I regret that decision every day but because no one will catch me if I fall I am stuck with the 'sensible' option. I know how you feel...I am not looking forward to that office job life either. Perhaps I can still do the things I love in the evenings...
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    I have no idea, I'm 25, in a dead end sort of job, and have nothing but GCSE's, and a BTEC under my belt. I did opt for uni studying animation but left. Wasn't for me. I didn't go back, and still have no idea. I was hoping this forum would help me decide what to do, but it seriously hasn't.

    I can see myself at 30 odd suddenly deciding, and then opting for uni again, but I'm seriously at a loss right now.

    My only hope is that my passion for 3D art will shine soon, or I'll get lucky with my music.
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    I literally have thought about so many different things to do, I've always been an all-rounder in school and college, being about the same for everything rather than really good at one thing. I did a range of different A-Levels too and I considered journalism or teaching, but then I always really wanted to do something medical. So in my final year of an English degree now, rather than apply for a PGCE, I'm applying for nursing! It took time but it came to me eventually, as I'm sure it will to you too! A few nurses inspired me to nurse, and also it is something medically related that I can use my people skills with, so its perfectly suited to me.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I genuinely envy people like that. They know early on they want to be a doctor, teacher, actor, nurse and so on. When I think about it, I mean really think about it, I have no clue. I'm studying a science degree, though I find science interesting, I'm not passionate about it, chances are I won't be working in a related field cause chilling in a lab all day long isn't my cup of tea.

    I don't like the idea of working 9-5 in an office all day. Just living for a the weekend and 25days worth of holidays a year. I like the idea of meeting people, building bridges, travelling to different destinations, something I can immerse myself. But I'm not particularly talented or skilled at anything, like I don't act, dance, sing or what ever. Nor do I feel particularly passionate about anything at this point in time. I dunno I guess I'm just venting really.

    If you know what you want to do in life, how did you decide? If you don't know, what are you doing in the mean time? How does one go about finding what they really want to do in life if they have no clue?
    I was at this exact stage 2 years ago. I was in a science degree, I didn't act/dance/sing etc. but wanted what you want. Then at age 19 I found a style of dance I'm really passionate about and would like to go pro with by around age 25 :P Random I know, so it might still happen for you!
    Currently I'm still in my science degree because my dance dreams are quite far away, I plan to finish it then go on to do research while I keep training 4-5 times a week. I'll see where I am by 25 the thought of not knowing what's coming is exciting more than anything.


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    Most young people get their 'calling' from the influence and support of others, 99.9% parents.
    It took me three years before I figured out exactly what I wanted to do with my life. Truth be told, the office lifestyle is really not as bad as people try to convey. For me, it just depends on the individuals you have in that specific environment.

    Last year I were working for Telefonica in the Stratford Centre doing.......data entry -yes! the most monotonous job you could ever think of. Surname, gender, business/contract, mobile number etc - but do you know what brought it to life? The people - and the environment. And I mean comon.. working directly opposite Westfield Shopping Centre - every lunch time felt like a school trip.

    I do the bolded for a living now - or rather it's getting there. Haven't got to the travelling to different destinations part yet though. And hey - I'm not particularly talented either, I don't act, dance or since either. :daydreaming:

    You sound very familiar to someone I talk to quite regularly, if you're her then you already know what I'm going to say. - Sometimes finding a 'passion' isn't the answer, it's more about building a skillset, that you can then choose from to create whatever you feel like creating. You need not ever have to stick with one thing for your entire life. That can be utterly boring, especially if your passion for that particular subject/activity is not enlighteningly (is that a word?) strong

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I genuinely envy people like that. They know early on they want to be a doctor, teacher, actor, nurse and so on. When I think about it, I mean really think about it, I have no clue. I'm studying a science degree, though I find science interesting, I'm not passionate about it, chances are I won't be working in a related field cause chilling in a lab all day long isn't my cup of tea.

    I don't like the idea of working 9-5 in an office all day. Just living for a the weekend and 25days worth of holidays a year. I like the idea of meeting people, building bridges, travelling to different destinations, something I can immerse myself. But I'm not particularly talented or skilled at anything, like I don't act, dance, sing or what ever. Nor do I feel particularly passionate about anything at this point in time. I dunno I guess I'm just venting really.

    If you know what you want to do in life, how did you decide? If you don't know, what are you doing in the mean time? How does one go about finding what they really want to do in life if they have no clue?
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    I thought the same thing. I remember sitting in the first lesson of my chemistry alevel and we had to go around the room and say what we wanted to do at university/as a job. Everyone confidently said what they wanted to be with adamantly and when it got to me I just said I wasn't sure yet. A year on and the girl who was so set on being a dentist now wants to join the police, someone set on being a surgeon now wants to be a health and social care teacher.

    Even people I have known since I was 11 who were set on a certain career for the 7 years I have known them have changed their minds in the past few months. The majority who seem like they know what they want actually don't so don't worry.
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    Some people just do, whilst for others it can take some time. I'm the latter, it took me until I was aged 24 to work out what I wanted to do.
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    (Original post by LSD)
    I was at this exact stage 2 years ago. I was in a science degree, I didn't act/dance/sing etc. but wanted what you want. Then at age 19 I found a style of dance I'm really passionate about and would like to go pro with by around age 25 :P Random I know, so it might still happen for you!
    Currently I'm still in my science degree because my dance dreams are quite far away, I plan to finish it then go on to do research while I keep training 4-5 times a week. I'll see where I am by 25 the thought of not knowing what's coming is exciting more than anything.
    I like this a lot, keep at it.

    You're all talking quite a bit of sense tbh. Most of all it's good to know I'm not alone in this. I actually feel happier, as odd as it sounds, to admit to myself that I don't actually know what I want to do. Instead of pursuing paths I feel nothing for, and setting myself up for failure/disappointment.
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    Best thing to go for is what you're passionate about.
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    (Original post by The_master616)
    Best thing to go for is what you're passionate about.
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Nor do I feel particularly passionate about anything at this point in time. I dunno I guess I'm just venting really.
    Having said that, I'm considering steps to find it. I know it's unlikely to happen from my bedside.
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    Find a job you love and are really passionate about, then you'll be happier for more than the weekend and your 25 days of holiday a year
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I like the idea of meeting people, building bridges, travelling to different destinations, something I can immerse myself.
    THis is something everyone likes the idea of until they do it!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I genuinely envy people like that. They know early on they want to be a doctor, teacher, actor, nurse and so on. When I think about it, I mean really think about it, I have no clue. I'm studying a science degree, though I find science interesting, I'm not passionate about it, chances are I won't be working in a related field cause chilling in a lab all day long isn't my cup of tea.

    I don't like the idea of working 9-5 in an office all day. Just living for a the weekend and 25days worth of holidays a year. I like the idea of meeting people, building bridges, travelling to different destinations, something I can immerse myself. But I'm not particularly talented or skilled at anything, like I don't act, dance, sing or what ever. Nor do I feel particularly passionate about anything at this point in time. I dunno I guess I'm just venting really.

    If you know what you want to do in life, how did you decide? If you don't know, what are you doing in the mean time? How does one go about finding what they really want to do in life if they have no clue?
    Some wing of the civil service?
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    ideally in life I want to get married I want to have childrena and I want to be a criminal defence lawyer, Unfortunatly criminal defence and having children dont mix due to the stupid hours and being on call constantly so ive looked into jobs such as medical negligance /personal injury lawyers that are 9-5 and which allow me to have a family.

    Since I was little I knew all i wanted to be when i grew up was a mum and this desire has only increased the older ive got so im still not sure what i want to do job wise but i know 100% what i want to do life wise
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    I was lost. Went travelling, met a girl who told me she wanted her man to have more direction, and now I'm studying and although I would have never chosen such a path without pressure from her, I'm so glad I'm doing it. She dumped me, haha, but still I feel great about the choice I've made now. And am so glad I didn't do university straight after school. Probably 80% of my high school friends hate or don't care about their degree subjects, whereas I've carefully chosen mine and fully intend to take it as far as possible. The main difference now is that I've chosen what I'm good at, instead of what I 'want'. It just feels good to be good at it. No point chasing a subject you're doomed to fail on, which is what a lot of people do, I think.

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    Office jobs aren't necessarily bad. Most jobs involve sitting at a desk in an office a lot of the time. Lots of interesting stuff can happen in an office.

    I'm a bit unusual in this respect. I've known what I wanted to do (game programming) since I was a small child. And it's not related to what either of my parents do. They did encourage and support me though, so in many ways it's still thanks to them that I actually followed through with it.

    But take it from me, having a job you like is not a magic panacea that makes your life perfect. Far from it. Maybe it does work out like that for some people, but you sometimes have to make sacrifices.
 
 
 
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