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    This is going to turn into a bit of a rant so I apologise now! With the rise of platforms such as Steam and Origin, so many people now download their games legally rather than going out to buy them in a store or ordering a physical disc online. It's easier for me if I do that, I don't have to go out, I don't have to wait for delivery and I don't have to worry about stock levels. It's also a hell of a lot easier for the game maker too - no manufacturing costs, no physical costs of discs, printing, cases etc., no shipping costs, no faffing and worrying about stock levels, pretty sure it'll save them a tidy packet and it also stops people selling games on after. Simple all round right? So why the hell do they feel the justification to charge the same for an online download as they do a physical disc? In fact, I can buy the game I was just looking at for £5 cheaper using Amazon than I could download it legally for. To me it's just ridiculous! They wonder why people download things illegally, maybe that's why. It's easy and hassle free without being charged just as much as you would for a 'proper' game. *sigh* Rant over!
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    The cost of manufacturing a game's disk is minimal, the price reflects anticipated supply and demand in order to cover the high development costs of a modern game.

    On the point about downloading being even more expensive, I think it's just an administrative error. The same happens very often with CDs; second hand CDs in particular are nearly always cheaper than album downloads, even though they objectively give you more. The market is all a bit messed up, it'll be interesting to see how it changes in the next few years. Here's hoping for lower prices all round.
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    However minimal, it's a cost that's not passed on to the buyer at all. There's production costs of the disc, case and booklet, there's factory and warehouse costs, shipping costs of factory to warehouse, warehouse to distributor. That will cost them a huge amount and although it may only be a little spread across each game, that's still a saving that, I think, should be passed on to the buyer.

    I don't think it is an administrative error. Most places are charging £29.99, which is the same as the download cost, Amazon are just cheaper than anyone else as I generally find that they are.
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    I do think downloaded games (new, especially) are slightly over-priced, given that you don't even physically receive anything. Although - boxed games aren't much better, these days! For example, look at what came in the original "big" box for Baldur's Gate 2 compared to a modern game! You're lucky if the manual is more than a 2-page insert...

    That said - Steam do big price drops / special prices fairly regularly that you'd not get elsewhere, and their prices for older games are very reasonable, given that the devs are still getting a cut (unlike ebay / 2nd hand in store). I also prefer the convenience of digital distribution.
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    (Original post by Vanadesse)
    However minimal, it's a cost that's not passed on to the buyer at all. There's production costs of the disc, case and booklet, there's factory and warehouse costs, shipping costs of factory to warehouse, warehouse to distributor. That will cost them a huge amount and although it may only be a little spread across each game, that's still a saving that, I think, should be passed on to the buyer.
    Agreed. The cost isn't that minimal. It's not just the cost of physically manufacturing the disc.

    Apparently one of the reasons for the often ridiculous download prices is that they still rely on retailers of physical discs (including places like Amazon, not just high street shops), so they can't undercut them. On the Playstation store the games normally sell for the RRP. The thing is retailers very rarely sell games at the RRP. They almost always sell considerably lower.
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    I noticed this on a CD on amazon yesterday. They were selling the CD (amazon themselves not any of the marketplace sellers) for £5.25 or you could get the digital download of the same CD exactly the same tracks no extras for £9.49! It's ridiculous.
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    (Original post by Vanadesse)
    This is going to turn into a bit of a rant so I apologise now! With the rise of platforms such as Steam and Origin, so many people now download their games legally rather than going out to buy them in a store or ordering a physical disc online. It's easier for me if I do that, I don't have to go out, I don't have to wait for delivery and I don't have to worry about stock levels. It's also a hell of a lot easier for the game maker too - no manufacturing costs, no physical costs of discs, printing, cases etc., no shipping costs, no faffing and worrying about stock levels, pretty sure it'll save them a tidy packet and it also stops people selling games on after. Simple all round right? So why the hell do they feel the justification to charge the same for an online download as they do a physical disc? In fact, I can buy the game I was just looking at for £5 cheaper using Amazon than I could download it legally for. To me it's just ridiculous! They wonder why people download things illegally, maybe that's why. It's easy and hassle free without being charged just as much as you would for a 'proper' game. *sigh* Rant over!
    Because we are not at a stage where downloading games is a viable option for everyone, what with slow broadband speeds, data caps, and limited hard drive space on consoles. Thus games publishers and console makers are still reliant on retailers to carry and sell the majority of their products, and they currently aren't in a position of power to risk undermining their relationship with retailers by offering downloads cheaper than the physical media.
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    (Original post by rich2606)
    Because we are not at a stage where downloading games is a viable option for everyone, what with slow broadband speeds, data caps, and limited hard drive space on consoles. Thus games publishers and console makers are still reliant on retailers to carry and sell the majority of their products, and they currently aren't in a position of power to risk undermining their relationship with retailers by offering downloads cheaper than the physical media.
    That could change in the next few years. The PS4 will come with a fairly large hard disk (saying that 500GB could still only fit 10 games if they're all full blu-ray size). And games will be playable without being fully downloaded.
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    I have to admit, Steam are very good particularly with their sales.

    Games are just ridiculously priced. I was in GAME yesterday, £45 for Sim City?! I actually had to look twice! Downloaded games gets rid of the option to sell them on too, another money maker for the game makers.

    It was EA Games/Origin that I was specifically moaning about. I actually spoke to someone on live chat who, very kindly, offered me a 15% discount code. Get in I thought, that'd match Amazon price and I'd buy it there and then. He then told me it might not work on an expansion pack. I tried and low and behold it didn't work, not because it's an expansion pack but because the game was less than a month old. He told me I'd have to wait until the 6th of April to download it and use the code. When I asked him if he could give a different code or something. He told me to call the high level team as he's escalated it to them but I'd have to wait until Tuesday. When I asked if they'd email me instead he went off at me saying I won't listen when he says he can't help and that if I don't stop right away he'll report me and higher level will take strict action against me! I was polite and patient, I just asked questions, I wasn't rude, I didn't get annoyed, I wasn't offensive. He was just a **** who puts me off EA Games! He started so well too lol
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    (Original post by Vanadesse)
    However minimal, it's a cost that's not passed on to the buyer at all. There's production costs of the disc, case and booklet, there's factory and warehouse costs, shipping costs of factory to warehouse, warehouse to distributor. That will cost them a huge amount and although it may only be a little spread across each game, that's still a saving that, I think, should be passed on to the buyer.

    I don't think it is an administrative error. Most places are charging £29.99, which is the same as the download cost, Amazon are just cheaper than anyone else as I generally find that they are.
    There is a cost for digital games as well, by the time distributors have taken their cut of the digital sale, it probably works out developers get the same as selling a physical copy. Then there are hosting costs for the digital distribution, servers, websites, applications.

    As for sales/reduced prices on physical items, that is completely company dependent and nothing to do with the developers, they may just want get rid of stock.

    Buy yea, EA are terrible for digital sales, as Origin is their own program, they are essentially getting the 30%~ cut back which they could reduce game prices for a bit.
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    (Original post by rich2606)
    Because we are not at a stage where downloading games is a viable option for everyone, what with slow broadband speeds, data caps, and limited hard drive space on consoles. Thus games publishers and console makers are still reliant on retailers to carry and sell the majority of their products, and they currently aren't in a position of power to risk undermining their relationship with retailers by offering downloads cheaper than the physical media.
    To be fair, I DL games / movies fairly comfortably on a 5mb connection... it can be gruelling but usually leaving the PC on over-night or while out at work is enough to get a game, which isn't TOO bad. I'm also not sure why anyone in this day and age would put up with a usage cap, not when unlimited connections are relatively cheap wherever you look. Console HD size is a limiting factor but this gen is nearly finished...

    TBH I can see optical media dying out after the upcoming console gen. I'm primarily a PC gamer these days, and the only reason my new PC even has an optical drive in it is because I couldn't be arsed making a bootable USB stick to install the OS, and because I've been unable to find downloadable drivers for my wireless card. It's not seen a disc since the day 1 setup was complete. I can see consoles going the same way within a decade - which would time well for the PS5 / XBOX1080 (... 1440? lulz).
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    As long as I can get a game for a decent price, I don't really care whether it's a download or disc copy. Downloads are more convenient since I can buy them and then download them right away. But if I want to buy a game which is on offer as a download but is huge (e.g. Max Payne 3 or Hitman Absolution - both over 20GB each), I'll just wait for the disc copy to go on sale. So I guess there are perks in both options.

    Also, Origin sucks. Their prices are just horrendous. For example, Battlefield 3 costs £30 as a download, which I got on Amazon (boxed version) the other day for £13. **** Origin. Steam, GameFly and GreenManGaming have best deals.
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    (Original post by Supertoaster)
    There is a cost for digital games as well, by the time distributors have taken their cut of the digital sale, it probably works out developers get the same as selling a physical copy. Then there are hosting costs for the digital distribution, servers, websites, applications.
    The costs of digital distribution do work out to a lot less than physical copies. The cost of hosting a game and the bandwidth for getting it to customers is a fraction of the cost of a physical boxed disc that has to be physically shipped somewhere.

    However I'm not sure how those savings get distributed between the platform holder (Valve, Sony, Microsoft, etc.) and the publisher/developer. But you have to remember that on consoles, the platform holder takes a pretty sizeable cut of the sale anyway, even if it's a physical copy. Certainly at least one of them makes far more per digital sale vs. a physical sale.
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    To be fair, I like Steam and do use them quite a lot. Origin however, no chance, won't be touching it with a barge pole. It's like someone said on here, I do understand that if I made a game and sold it through Steam, Steam want their cut and so it possibly won't work out massively different but Origin/EA have absolutely no excuse for that at all. Not only are they saving their production costs but they're also cutting out the middle man and using their own online selling platform.

    I thought that it was pretty good of them to offer me a 15% discount as they really didn't have to do that, I expected an 'Ok, your point has been noted now get lost' kind of response. Didn't appreciate being told how I'll have strict action taken against me just for asking a few questions and trying to work out a few things though!

    Speaking of Steam, now that I've been paid I better go check out their offers
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    (Original post by Vanadesse)
    To be fair, I like Steam and do use them quite a lot. Origin however, no chance, won't be touching it with a barge pole. It's like someone said on here, I do understand that if I made a game and sold it through Steam, Steam want their cut and so it possibly won't work out massively different but Origin/EA have absolutely no excuse for that at all. Not only are they saving their production costs but they're also cutting out the middle man and using their own online selling platform.

    I thought that it was pretty good of them to offer me a 15% discount as they really didn't have to do that, I expected an 'Ok, your point has been noted now get lost' kind of response. Didn't appreciate being told how I'll have strict action taken against me just for asking a few questions and trying to work out a few things though!

    Speaking of Steam, now that I've been paid I better go check out their offers
    You can find best deals on here: http://www.reddit.com/r/GameDeals/
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    (Original post by RabbitCFH)
    You can find best deals on here: http://www.reddit.com/r/GameDeals/
    Ah cool, thanks I'll take a look :cool:
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    (Original post by RabbitCFH)
    As long as I can get a game for a decent price, I don't really care whether it's a download or disc copy. Downloads are more convenient since I can buy them and then download them right away. But if I want to buy a game which is on offer as a download but is huge (e.g. Max Payne 3 or Hitman Absolution - both over 20GB each), I'll just wait for the disc copy to go on sale. So I guess there are perks in both options.

    Also, Origin sucks. Their prices are just horrendous. For example, Battlefield 3 costs £30 as a download, which I got on Amazon (boxed version) the other day for £13. **** Origin. Steam, GameFly and GreenManGaming have best deals.
    Origin have sales too. I bought BF3 for £9.99 back in October during a sale, and it's been at that price a couple of times since. Like every other store/digital distribution site, you have to be patient yet also quick to act to get the best deals.
 
 
 
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