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Why don't chloride ions react in the blood? watch

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    If chloride ions can displace hydrogen from carbon, the two most abundant elements in the human body; then why don't chloride ions react whilst in the blood? i.e. why don't the chlorine ions that maintain the charge of a red blood cell displace oxygen from haemoglobin, why don't they react with C-H bonds in polysaccharides when they react with those in an alkane.

    Also, could they not react with one and other to create Cl2?

    Thank you in advance
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    I've came to the realization that it is most likely due to their full outer p-orbitals.

    But I'm now confused as to why Cl- ions react with anything. Should they not have similar properties to noble gases?

    Any clarification/idea would be much appreciated.
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    (Original post by saltyjohn1)
    I've came to the realization that it is most likely due to their full outer p-orbitals.

    But I'm now confused as to why Cl- ions react with anything. Should they not have similar properties to noble gases?

    Any clarification/idea would be much appreciated.

    (Original post by saltyjohn1)
    If chloride ions can displace hydrogen from carbon, the two most abundant elements in the human body; then why don't chloride ions react whilst in the blood? i.e. why don't the chlorine ions that maintain the charge of a red blood cell displace oxygen from haemoglobin, why don't they react with C-H bonds in polysaccharides when they react with those in an alkane.

    Also, could they not react with one and other to create Cl2?

    Thank you in advance
    Are you mistaking chloride with chlorine? Chlorine can react with C-H bonds via radical mechanisms but chloride ions are stable and fairly unreactive.
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    (Original post by saltyjohn1)
    If chloride ions can displace hydrogen from carbon, the two most abundant elements in the human body; then why don't chloride ions react whilst in the blood? i.e. why don't the chlorine ions that maintain the charge of a red blood cell displace oxygen from haemoglobin, why don't they react with C-H bonds in polysaccharides when they react with those in an alkane.

    Also, could they not react with one and other to create Cl2?

    Thank you in advance
    Chloride is a pretty darn good leaving group in the sense that its quite stable. Its pKa is a testament to this fact.
 
 
 
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