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    What's the difference between the course content of Oxford's "Experimental Psychology" and Cambridge's "Psychological and Behavioural Sciences" ?

    Are they both suitable if you wish to have a career in clinical psychology/forensic psychology/educational psychology or industrial and occupational psychology?

    Which degree is looked upon more favourably by employers?
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    Both courses would be suitable if you wanted to pursue further training to become a psychologist as they are accredited by the BPS. As for which course is looked on more favorably it would be impossible to say because both universities are very highly regarded as I'm sure you know; any difference would be minimal but it is possible that one may be significantly better than the other for psychology (you'll need to research this if this factor is important to you). What you need to ensure is that the course you choose is suitable for you and you like the facilities etc. - the content of both courses is probably very different. Your degree classification is crucial as if you get a 2.2 or below it's highly unlikely you'll get onto a postgraduate training programme as it is extremely competitive and most courses ask for a 2.1 or perhaps even a 1st, with relevant professional experience on top of that.
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    Hey.

    See http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...y_At_Cambridge

    Psychology at cambridge you HAVE to take 2 papers (1/2 the course) not in psychology in the first year, and 1 or 2 papers on the second year which are not in psychology. They will probably be equally good for getting a psychology job. If you taylor your additional paper choices to what psychology job you want to do, then you might be at an advantage going to cambridge, i.e. if you want to be an educational psychologist you can take papers in education or sociology of education or you can take a criminology paper for forensic psychology. At Oxford I think you pretty much only study psychology unless you do PPP or something.
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    Thanks for the help, much appreciated. Is there any benefit doing a straight psychology (C800) degree as I'm thinking of doing psychology with another subject? Does that ruin your chances of getting on a masters course for clinical/forensic/educational/occupational psychology? Or your chances of getting a good job?
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    Whatever you decide you will need to get Graduate Basis for Chartership if you want to become a professional psychologist. Just be aware that some joint degrees don't offer that if they don't cover the essential modules.

    Both Oxford and Cambridge do have a good reputation, but where you did your undergraduate degree is usually less important than the marks you attained on your transcript and how you gain experience during and after your degree.

    The advantage of going to Oxbridge, in addition to one to one tutorials and highly motivated peer group, is access to the brilliant research networks the potential to develop good links with high profile psychologists. Also Oxbridge is well regarded by general graduate jobs outside psychology, and regarded highly if you decide to go to other generic graduate schemes. So it keeps your options more open in that way.

    However, some of the disadvantages are that the courses are pitched at a more intensive level and (possibly) easier to get poor marks on, which will be a problem if you want to go down routes like Clinical or Forensic Psychology, where some courses will not cut you slack if you get below a good 2:1 regardless from where it is from. Also bear in mind that much of the jobs that grads do to get relevant experience prior to their postgraduate training forensic, clinical and educational psychology is often low level, like classroom assistant or support worker and they may have their own views about how an Oxbridge graduate may fit in.

    However, that is far off in the distance for you. I would suggest you go to the place where you feel you would be happiest, and then think about your future plans after you have more of an idea about the various sub fields of psychology.
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    (Original post by taylorswiftx)
    Thanks for the help, much appreciated. Is there any benefit doing a straight psychology (C800) degree as I'm thinking of doing psychology with another subject? Does that ruin your chances of getting on a masters course for clinical/forensic/educational/occupational psychology? Or your chances of getting a good job?
    Hey. As long as you have an accredited psychology degree (not all mixed degrees are accredited), then you should be fine. As the person above said, your transcript matters more, although im sure a high 2.1 from oxbridge will also be fine as firsts from elsewhere. I don't know much about post grad applications, so i can't really say. It definately will not RUIN your chances for sure, and if your extra subjects link to what you want to do post grad (so i could do sociology and criminology as a part of my degree), im sure it would boost my application for forensic psychology if i wanted to do that, so it really depends on what you wanted to do.
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    (Original post by taylorswiftx)
    What's the difference between the course content of Oxford's "Experimental Psychology" and Cambridge's "Psychological and Behavioural Sciences" ?

    Are they both suitable if you wish to have a career in clinical psychology/forensic psychology/educational psychology or industrial and occupational psychology?

    Which degree is looked upon more favourably by employers?
    I applied for Experimental Psychology this year (and have an offer), mainly because when I was looking at courses Cambridge didn't offer the PBS yet. Even once I found out that they did offer it, I preferred the Oxford course anyway. If you look on their websites they should give a clear description of the course and what it involves.
    Both will be suitable for a career in psychology, and are probably equally looked upon by employers. What is most important is probably not the course that you choose but what you do with it.

    If you are undecided then I would definitely suggest visiting both on open days, as you might suddenly find that you really like one over the other. Speak to students and attend the lectures. Some colleges might also a set time where you can talk to lecturers about the course. I was undecided about whether the EP course was for me, but after talking to a student about it I was really swayed. It sounded so exciting and just like what I wanted to do. Also, consider where you would most like to live.
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    Hi,
    and what are the differences between "human sciences" at Oxford and "psychological and behavioural sciences" at Cambridge are?
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    (Original post by ninaherz)
    Hi,
    and what are the differences between "human sciences" at Oxford and "psychological and behavioural sciences" at Cambridge are?
    The Courses have considerable overlap, however the main difference is the Psychology focus of the PBS course and the BPS recognition for Psychology which only PBS has and not Human Sciences.

    Human Sciences only exposes you to Psychology Theory in the 3rd year whereas in PBS you take a Psychology paper in year 1 and a Methods paper covering neurophysiology/stats. The Human Sciences course offers less choice in comparison to PBS.

    the First year of Human Sciences is:
    -The biology of organisms including humans
    -Genetics and evolution
    -Society, culture and environment
    -Sociology and demography
    -Quantitative methods for the human sciences

    First Year of PBS:
    -Introduction to Psychology (covering topics from Choice and Risk/Psychopathology/Development/Addiction/Emotion)
    -Psychological Inquiry and Methods (Neuro/Stats/Research Methods)
    - Option 1
    - Option 2

    Optional Choices cover topics such as, Evolution and Behaviour, Humans in Biological Perspectives, Sociology/Social Theory, Social Anthropology, Microeconomics, Archeology, Language Communication and Literacy, Philosophy of Mind and Metaphysics, Logic.

    So as you can see its possible to cover similar topics in the PBS course that match the content of the human sciences course well. Although there is of course more flexibility in PBS in the first year and there is a psychology focus in PBS that is unseen in Human Sciences.

    The Second year is where the differences are more prominent, In PBS you take Social Psychology (not available in Human Sci) and either Biological and Cog Psych (which might be offered in y3 of Human Sci) or Experimental Psychology and a small research project (this is taken from the natural sciences course at cam so v.sciency), and then you are left with choices. The second year PBS choices cover, Biological and Social Anthropology, Sociology, Politics, Behavioural Economics, Criminology and some other Philosophy papers. In Human Sciences you study a human geography paper, ecology and some genetics and evolution papers (similar to the bio anthropology papers in PBS).

    In y3 the Human Sciences Course you study:

    Option courses (two chosen) from a list which may vary slightly depending on teaching availability: Anthropology of a selected region (for example Europe, Japan, Lowland South America, South Asia, or West Africa); Anthropology of medicine; Cognition and culture; Cognitive and evolutionary anthropology; Gender theories and realities: cross-cultural perspectives; Health and disease; Language; Physical and forensic anthropology: an introduction to human skeletal remains; Quantitative methods; Sociology of post-industrial societies; South and southern Africa; plus a range of psychology options.

    Whereas in PBS you do a dissertation/research project and take 3 papers from, Development and Psychopathology, Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Gender Development, Psychology and Social Issues, Sociology of Education, Philosophy of Psychology and cognitive science, History of Psychology or select papers from Politics, Socal/Bio Anthropology, Sociology etc...

    I think the courses do have overlap, and PBS has considerable choice attached to the course, but the overriding differences is PBS has a large Psychology content that Human Sciences does not offer. If you are interested in a career in research either courses would suffice, however if you are interested in Clinical/Educational Psych for example then PBS is BPS accredited so a better option
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    thank you very much that helps me a lot!
    I am very grateful for your answer
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    (Original post by ninaherz)
    thank you very much that helps me a lot!
    I am very grateful for your answer
    No problem, if you have any more/further questions feel free to Inbox me or reply on here
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    Am I right that PBS focuses on biology whereas the psychology, Philosophy and Lingustic course at Oxford (If I choose Psychology and Linguistic) will focus on language development?

    I also have another question but that one is a little different:
    I am from Germany and the entry requirements for Oxford is an Abitur of 1.5 for Cambridge it is harder 1.3 do you think that the requirements for Oxford are really lower? (it is hard to believe)

    May I ask you what you are studying?

    For PPL I have to take the TSA and the MLAT, do you have experients with one of them?
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    (Original post by ninaherz)
    Am I right that PBS focuses on biology whereas the psychology, Philosophy and Lingustic course at Oxford (If I choose Psychology and Linguistic) will focus on language development?

    I also have another question but that one is a little different:
    I am from Germany and the entry requirements for Oxford is an Abitur of 1.5 for Cambridge it is harder 1.3 do you think that the requirements for Oxford are really lower? (it is hard to believe)

    May I ask you what you are studying?

    For PPL I have to take the TSA and the MLAT, do you have experients with one of them?
    In PBS if you want to take lots of Biology you can (for example the first year methods paper and evolution and Behaviour and Biological Anthropology have a lot of Biology in it , as does The Experimental Psych option in y2 and 3) or if you want more social aspects you can take that route to eg take the language paper, Sociology, Criminology, Education etc. There is lots of choice. Furthermore, In PBS you can take a first year paper on Language, Communication and Literacy - which covers language development/acquisition.

    The Psychology and Linguistic course at oxford covers aspects of language acquisition and also alot on things like word structure and formation, Phonetics and Syntax so not a huge amount on language development, no. This is what is covered:

    http://www.ling-phil.ox.ac.uk/undergrads#fhs

    As for entry requirements, Cambridge often puts alot of emphasis on grades you attain just before starting university and for English students the Cambridge entry criteria on the whole is slightly higher, not by much. Both Universities take excellent candidates and MOST people will get higher grades that the entry criteria.

    I have taken the TSA before and it comprises of 50 multiple choice questions on basic logic and problem solving and then a short essay. I have a friend who has done the MLAT and that was where they were given a made up language and had to try and work out what different things said in the made up language.

    For PBS , some colleges require you to sit an test (usually an essay), a couple require the TSA (St Johns and Kings I believe), and some ask for essays written at school.
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    (Original post by ninaherz)
    ...
    I took the TSA this year (applied for Experimental Psychology at Oxford) and it is really based on maths questions and problem solving/critical thinking ones. At first it can seem quite difficult; I know that when I started practising I couldn't do half of the questions. However, there are lot of books available to help you develop such skills. If you choose to apply to Oxford, then the TSA will be one of the most important aspects of your application when it comes to them choosing who to invite to interview.

    With regards to the grades, that really is their minimum requirement. Just because other applicants will have higher grades does not mean that you will be disadvantaged (I 'only' meet their minimum requirements for A Levels).

    I can't really comment on Cambridge, but I know that Jack knows a lot about it, so that should be covered.
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    Thank you Jack and Pak1994!
    Which books have you used for preparation?

    I wish I could be also helpful for you!
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    (Original post by ninaherz)
    Thank you Jack and Pak1994!
    Which books have you used for preparation?

    I wish I could be also helpful for you!
    I used Thinking Skills by John Butterworth and Geoff Thwaites - http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/052152149..._df_0521521491 (mainly because this is what was available at my local library so I could get it for free). This is also one of the books that they recommend for practising.
    I found it was good and as I went through it things started to get easier. One of the best points I can give is to underline the important words in the question, which you should begin to notice by practising. There is usually quite a lot of information, and most of it is not actually important for the answer.
    There are also lots of past papers on this website - http://www.admissionstestingservice....or-tsa-oxford/ (I say lots, because it is more than are available for the other TSA tests).
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    (Original post by ninaherz)
    Thank you Jack and Pak1994!
    Which books have you used for preparation?

    I wish I could be also helpful for you!
    As well as the book Pak1994 suggested this one was really good for examples and answers:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Think-You-Ca...881582-4799910

    If you go with Oxford I think there is scope to switch courses when there if say you pick Psych and Linguistics and don't like it, I think its possible to move over to Experimental Psych, but you would have to check
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    I can not find example questuions with answers for the MLAT!
    has anyone a tip?

    Thank you in advance
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    (Original post by ninaherz)
    Hi,
    and what are the differences between "human sciences" at Oxford and "psychological and behavioural sciences" at Cambridge are?
    I did human sciences - it isn't remotely psychology-based and you might not get the chance to do any in the third year (it depends on how many spaces there are available in that year to join the psychologists). So if you're looking for an actual psychology degree don't look at human sciences (it's an amazing course tho!).
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    thank you very much but I have decided to apply for experimental psychology at oxford. (at least I will give it a try )
 
 
 
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