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Do I need a 'UCAS advisor' to apply to Law school in the UK from Canada Watch

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    Hi,

    Is it advantageous to have a 'UCAS advisor' to apply to law school in the UK from Canada? Does anybody know? Any insight would be helpful.

    I'm considering University of Leicester & 2 universities in London.
    The seminar I attended in by a UCAS advisor by the name of John G.Kelly - www.canadalawfromabroad.com, represents 8 UK law schools, but not the University of Leicester.
    I don't know if I should just apply on my own on the UCAS website, or use the 'UCAS advisor'?
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    (Original post by nickyz)
    Hi,

    Is it advantageous to have a 'UCAS advisor' to apply to law school in the UK from Canada? Does anybody know? Any insight would be helpful.

    I'm considering University of Leicester & 2 universities in London.
    The seminar I attended in by a UCAS advisor by the name of John G.Kelly - www.canadalawfromabroad.com, represents 8 UK law schools, but not the University of Leicester.
    I don't know if I should just apply on my own on the UCAS website, or use the 'UCAS advisor'?
    You need Mr Kelly to make a UCAS application in the same way that you need a butler in order to make a Bloody Mary.

    Frankly there is nothing Mr Kelly can provide that you cannot get from TSR.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    You need Mr Kelly to make a UCAS application in the same way that you need a butler in order to make a Bloody Mary.

    Frankly there is nothing Mr Kelly can provide that you cannot get from TSR.
    Thanks!
    Loved the analogy! So funny
    I'm a 'mature' student from Canada wanting to go to law school in the UK. I'm so green to this. I don't know what schools to apply to but I attended a seminar in Toronto from Univ. of Leicester & another seminar put on by Canada Law from Abroad and their ' 8 Preferred U.K. Law schools ', which included univ of Birmingham, univ of Bristol, The City Law school, univ of Exeter, univ of Kent, Queen Mary, univ of Southampton, univ of Sussex. Do you know anything about these schools? I'd prefer to live in London so I'm thinking Queen Mary or The City Law school. I'm also considering Leicester.
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    (Original post by nickyz)
    Thanks!
    Loved the analogy! So funny
    I'm a 'mature' student from Canada wanting to go to law school in the UK. I'm so green to this. I don't know what schools to apply to but I attended a seminar in Toronto from Univ. of Leicester & another seminar put on by Canada Law from Abroad and their ' 8 Preferred U.K. Law schools ', which included univ of Birmingham, univ of Bristol, The City Law school, univ of Exeter, univ of Kent, Queen Mary, univ of Southampton, univ of Sussex. Do you know anything about these schools? I'd prefer to live in London so I'm thinking Queen Mary or The City Law school. I'm also considering Leicester.
    A very large number of overseas applicants would prefer to live in London and to a great extent City trades on this. It is not as good as any of the other universities mentioned.

    Leicester is a fine university and would hold its own with all but Bristol, Queen Mary and probably Exeter and there will be students at Leicester better than students at those three.
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    Thank you!
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    That's an odd bunch in the 8 preferred law schools. I recommend you find out a bit more about who is making that recommendation - Canadian law firms? Or just some random organisation that has a relationship with 8 universities?

    See here for one of the UK's university rankings on law specifically (usual disclaimers about the drawbacks of rankings etc):

    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...rankings?s=Law

    Any in the top 30 or so are well-looked upon by UK employers. But oddly you'll see that none of the 8 you've mentioned appear in the top 10.

    If you're hoping to qualify as a lawyer in the UK then after doing your LLB degree, you then have to:
    - do a further one year practice course which channels you towards either the bar or being a solicitor; and
    - do work experience: either a pupillage with a set of chambers (the bar) or a training contract with a law firm (solicitor).

    That is where you might find it tricky because unless you have a UK passport you may need to be sponsored by your employer to do the work experience part. If you don't you won't qualify (or not in the UK at least), but if you do get a position you'll need to have the immigration visa to do it.

    At the top of the bar there is a strong preference for Oxford or Cambridge graduates, although of course people who went to other universities will get into the bar.

    Similarly with solicitors firms there is a strong preference for the best universities (broadly those which aren't former polytechnics). Here are some bar charts and pie charts re where people with training contracts in law firms (that is, the solicitor route) studied their LLB degree:

    http://d1d1tdqerevjwu.cloudfront.net... university.pdf

    I'm afraid in the law the university you choose does influence your ability to get a training contract or pupillage in the UK, so choose carefully.

    Finally, note that you can apply for up to 5 universities on your UCAS form and it would be sensible to use all your choices. To apply for Oxford or Cambridge you need to be the best, and the deadline is 15 October the year before you propose to start studying. This is fairly early in the application cycle - all other universities have a Law deadline of 15 January. As an overseas student you can apply after 15 January (except for Oxford/Cambridge) but some of the more popular universities may be closed to new applicants, so it's safer to apply to the UK deadlines rather than the overseas deadlines.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    That's an odd bunch in the 8 preferred law schools. I recommend you find out a bit more about who is making that recommendation - Canadian law firms? Or just some random organisation that has a relationship with 8 universities?

    See here for one of the UK's university rankings on law specifically (usual disclaimers about the drawbacks of rankings etc):

    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...rankings?s=Law

    Any in the top 30 or so are well-looked upon by UK employers. But oddly you'll see that none of the 8 you've mentioned appear in the top 10.

    If you're hoping to qualify as a lawyer in the UK then after doing your LLB degree, you then have to:
    - do a further one year practice course which channels you towards either the bar or being a solicitor; and
    - do work experience: either a pupillage with a set of chambers (the bar) or a training contract with a law firm (solicitor).

    That is where you might find it tricky because unless you have a UK passport you may need to be sponsored by your employer to do the work experience part. If you don't you won't qualify (or not in the UK at least), but if you do get a position you'll need to have the immigration visa to do it.

    At the top of the bar there is a strong preference for Oxford or Cambridge graduates, although of course people who went to other universities will get into the bar.

    Similarly with solicitors firms there is a strong preference for the best universities (broadly those which aren't former polytechnics - in your list of 8 only City is a former polytechnic). Here are some bar charts and pie charts re where people with training contracts in law firms (that is, the solicitor route) studied their LLB degree:

    http://d1d1tdqerevjwu.cloudfront.net... university.pdf

    I'm afraid in the law the university you choose does influence your ability to get a training contract or pupillage in the UK, so choose carefully.

    Finally, note that you can apply for up to 5 universities on your UCAS form and it would be sensible to use all your choices. To apply for Oxford or Cambridge you need to be the best, and the deadline is 15 October the year before you propose to start studying. This is fairly early in the application cycle - all other universities have a Law deadline of 15 January. As an overseas student you can apply after 15 January (except for Oxford/Cambridge) but some of the more popular universities may be closed to new applicants, so it's safer to apply to the UK deadlines rather than the overseas deadlines.
    It seems a pity to carp about a very informative post but you did get one thing wrong. As I was critical of City earlier in the thread, I should point out that City isn't an ex-Poly. It is a Robbins or plate-glass university. There was a City of London Polytechnic which became London Guildhall University and then merged with the University of North London (an enormous mistake) to form London Metropolitan University.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    It seems a pity to carp about a very informative post but you did get one thing wrong. As I was critical of City earlier in the thread, I should point out that City isn't an ex-Poly. It is a Robbins or plate-glass university. There was a City of London Polytechnic which became London Guildhall University and then merged with the University of North London (an enormous mistake) to form London Metropolitan University.
    Really? I had no idea. I can guarantee you that a fair few graduate recruiters out there are under the same impression - that City of London Polytechnic became City University. I have deleted that comment from my post.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    Really? I had no idea. I can guarantee you that a fair few graduate recruiters out there are under the same impression - that City of London Polytechnic became City University.
    Then they had also better be be careful if someone with a Welsh accent turns up saying that they studied at Yale.

    http://www.yale-wrexham.ac.uk/en/
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Then they had also better be be careful if someone with a Welsh accent turns up saying that they studied at Yale.

    http://www.yale-wrexham.ac.uk/en/
    Thanks a lot for the information posted. Clearly, I have more research to do.
    I'm not sure if I will want to come back to Canada, or stay in the UK.
    I have a Greek passport, so from my understanding, I can work in the UK.

    Is the post degree-1 year practice course very intense?
    I ask because financially, I'll need to work at least part time after my 3 year LLB is completed.
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    (Original post by nickyz)
    Thanks a lot for the information posted. Clearly, I have more research to do.
    I'm not sure if I will want to come back to Canada, or stay in the UK.
    I have a Greek passport, so from my understanding, I can work in the UK.

    Is the post degree-1 year practice course very intense?
    I ask because financially, I'll need to work at least part time after my 3 year LLB is completed.
    I did the LPC (solicitor route) so can only speak about that, but I didn't find it particularly intense. I enjoyed it more than my degree because it was more practical. You should have time for a part time job.

    It is very expensive though (£11,000+ with the College of Law even now), so the ideal is to try to get a training contract with a firm which will sponsor you through.

    Much much much more intense is the competition for training contracts. There are many more applicants than there are places and it's a real bottleneck. A lot of people who have studied law and done their LPC will never qualify as lawyers because they haven't been able to secure a training contract.
 
 
 
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