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    Is it a fair proposition to go from about g4+ to g6 trinity violin in a year ie from now till next summers sitting in June. No grades at present on violin but g4 clarinet working towards g6 easter 2014, g5 piano working to g7 dec 2013, player in question is currently 10.
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    (Original post by Babylufc)
    Is it a fair proposition to go from about g4+ to g6 trinity violin in a year ie from now till next summers sitting in June. No grades at present on violin but g4 clarinet working towards g6 easter 2014, g5 piano working to g7 dec 2013, player in question is currently 10.
    Flabbergasted. Absolutely flabbergasted.
    Possible? Yes, I suppose it is.. if said 10 year old is passionate and wants to practice excessively. We're not talking about the old '1 hour a day' kinda practice, either.
    It's not about time, the protégées (resisting temptation to narrow this statement down to the Asian race) of our time, and indeed in history, have all played at a masterful level from a very young age. It's not about age, it's about the level of determination and willingness to complete the requirements.
    Now, in terms of scales, I expect this idea of 'load it all on, nice and thick' is quite good, because he/she will HAVE to know them and will be practicing the same scales only on different instruments.
    I know the aural testing differs depending on the instrument, there's certainly no similarities between the aural tests for Violin and Piano grades... however, this should expand this young person's understanding of music.

    In terms of music, this is possibly quite a good idea.
    In terms of pressure, not so much.

    Hope this helped?
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    Resisting temptation to narrow this statement down to the Asian race
    I hope you're not ignorant enough to realise that there are plenty of Caucasian children who are also considered protégés, and contrary to what people seem to think, it isn't just the Asians. Just like it isn't only the Asians who are good at maths, and it isn't only the Asians who are doctors, etc.
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    (Original post by paddlesnap)
    I hope you're not ignorant enough to realise that there are plenty of Caucasian children who are also considered protégés, and contrary to what people seem to think, it isn't just the Asians. Just like it isn't only the Asians who are good at maths, and it isn't only the Asians who are doctors, etc.
    PERLEASE, drop the gun!
    I did say I was RESISTING the temptation, and I was resisting it for a reason.
    I am not narrow minded enough to assume that. I've never once encountered, in the flesh, an Asian musician; simply consider it anecdotal.
    Please, pick a fight about stereotypes somewhere else...
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    No she's bone idle really and hardly ever practices, her teachers think she's difficult to say the least, but she can just do stuff pretty quick, only sat 3 grades to date, plays all styles on piano blues, jazz, classic, pop, rock, improvisation, never did grades till last Easter, she's not Asian either .. She's been playing violin about 9 months is around 4/5 now, has done about 5 or so of g4 pieces, 2 on g5 ...
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    (Original post by Babylufc)
    Is it a fair proposition to go from about g4+ to g6 trinity violin in a year ie from now till next summers sitting in June. No grades at present on violin but g4 clarinet working towards g6 easter 2014, g5 piano working to g7 dec 2013, player in question is currently 10.
    Why don't you ask the player?
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    She'd probably say its easy ... Before her last exam clarinet she put on our notice board after she'd been roasted of doing nothing a list of bonuses dist, merit, pass, fail, for fail she put no chance it'll never happen lol ...
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    (Original post by Babylufc)
    No she's bone idle really and hardly ever practices, her teachers think she's difficult to say the least, but she can just do stuff pretty quick, only sat 3 grades to date, plays all styles on piano blues, jazz, classic, pop, rock, improvisation, never did grades till last Easter, she's not Asian either .. She's been playing violin about 9 months is around 4/5 now, has done about 5 or so of g4 pieces, 2 on g5 ...
    In that case, I'd say let her progress herself. If you push her into it too much, she'll resent you and quit sooner or later. However, be mindful that if you don't encourage her enough she'll do the same.

    As said above, mention it to her and tell her that you believe she can do it. Those dates are all far enough away to allow her some time to prepare. If her teachers think she's capable, and if she wants to do it, when the exam entries open, then put her in to it. If not, then don't. I expect there'd be nothing worse for a 10/11 year old to fail a music exam. I've known it to knock the spirit out of many an 18 year old.

    It really is important not to push too much. I cannot stress that enough. My mother didn't push me at all as a young learner, I quit three instruments because of it. Classical singing only survived because she was quietly interested in what I was doing, she likes to hear me gives some light criticism each time she does.
    It's all about praising the little steps and touching lightly on the not-so good. Leave the heavy stuff for the tutors to decide- you play good cop!

    Keep setting goals for her, though. At that young age she probably cannot see the bigger picture of why she's practicing. Perhaps show her some of these said protégés (Asian or not, yup, I went der) and tell her that if she works hard she could play like that?

    I dunno, I could never teach children music.

    (I read this back and it seems like I'm trying to tell you how to be a parent. Please don't take it this way, I don't mean to offend you. It's just my experiece!)
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    (Original post by Babylufc)
    She'd probably say its easy ...
    Well you don't know until you ask her. Does she even want to? It's important to make decisions about the musician's progress with the musician.

    I learnt clarinet with a teacher who pushed me through grade after grade for 6 years. She moved away and my new teacher isn't forcing me to strive for anything, and I find than not only is my progress more noticeable, but I am enjoying playing so much more. I often wonder how different things would be now if somebody had thought to ask me if I wanted to do all those grades. I might not have my grade eight but I'm sure I'd be just as good as, if not a better musician than I am now. Let the music happen organically. It's not all about grades.
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    We had a chat today and she's fine with this, asked her whether she can bridge the gap and she's ok with it. Also discussed this grade business with younger one, talented but more steady and sensible, and we have set out a plan, of doing only g6 and g8, shes just behind, but nearly 2 years younger, clar, violin, piano, abrsm jazz piano g5. To be honest I find these grades a bit if a pain, and a bit of a kop out to playing loads of material and styles. Main issue is getting into ensembles/orchestras without them especially when there is often no audition process or its based on paperwork to start.
 
 
 
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