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    Hi guys, hoping this is the right place to post this.

    So basically, I'm looking to apply for Physics w/ Astrophysics at university (at some places, straight astro) and in sight of this, I want to construct my Extended Project around the field.
    On my application to do the epq (thats how my school runs it) I wrote that I want to investigate the climate on Venus, and the ways in which that should influence environmental action on Earth.
    For anyone interested:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Essentially this revolves around the fact that Venus is pretty much the twin planet to Earth. They have virtually the same composition, and Venus is only a little smaller, but the typical temperature on Venus is 450 degrees celsius. This is primarily due to the runaway greenhouse effect on Venus.
    My EPQ would focus on the runaway greenhouse effect, and the idea that if Earth doesn't control its greenhouse gases, we'll end up at that temperature.

    My concern is that there isn't enough to write about on this. In addition, I am worried that it'll become too much of an Environmental dissertation, and that universities won't take me as a Physics applicant, but more of a Renewable Engineering student or something along those lines.

    So please let me know if you feel this is an apt topic for an Astrophysics applicant to write about!
    If not, what would you consider a good topic to research?
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    I'm currently finishing my epq, I'd say the main thing right now is getting something with a lot of research articles, books, resources you can use, before you get too committed. I originally wanted to explore something but had to change it when I realised there wasn't enough subjective data. Good luck!


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    (Original post by chapmouse)
    Hi guys, hoping this is the right place to post this.

    So basically, I'm looking to apply for Physics w/ Astrophysics at university (at some places, straight astro) and in sight of this, I want to construct my Extended Project around the field.
    On my application to do the epq (thats how my school runs it) I wrote that I want to investigate the climate on Venus, and the ways in which that should influence environmental action on Earth.
    For anyone interested:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Essentially this revolves around the fact that Venus is pretty much the twin planet to Earth. They have virtually the same composition, and Venus is only a little smaller, but the typical temperature on Venus is 450 degrees celsius. This is primarily due to the runaway greenhouse effect on Venus.
    My EPQ would focus on the runaway greenhouse effect, and the idea that if Earth doesn't control its greenhouse gases, we'll end up at that temperature.

    My concern is that there isn't enough to write about on this. In addition, I am worried that it'll become too much of an Environmental dissertation, and that universities won't take me as a Physics applicant, but more of a Renewable Engineering student or something along those lines.

    So please let me know if you feel this is an apt topic for an Astrophysics applicant to write about!
    If not, what would you consider a good topic to research?
    Don't worry about it. Universities won't make you an offer (or lack of) based on your epq. Your epq does seem more planetary based, but there's nothing wrong with that if that's what you like. In any case, if you wer ein an interview for example that'd give you plenty to talk about, even if it wasn't purely astrophysics.

    As for the epq itself, sometimes narrowing it down is good as often you can make it too wide a topic and write very little about a lot and not get into any good depth. Try doing research now and see if you get a feel about how much you could write about it.
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    (Original post by chapmouse)
    Hi guys, hoping this is the right place to post this.

    So basically, I'm looking to apply for Physics w/ Astrophysics at university (at some places, straight astro) and in sight of this, I want to construct my Extended Project around the field.
    On my application to do the epq (thats how my school runs it) I wrote that I want to investigate the climate on Venus, and the ways in which that should influence environmental action on Earth.
    For anyone interested:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Essentially this revolves around the fact that Venus is pretty much the twin planet to Earth. They have virtually the same composition, and Venus is only a little smaller, but the typical temperature on Venus is 450 degrees celsius. This is primarily due to the runaway greenhouse effect on Venus.
    My EPQ would focus on the runaway greenhouse effect, and the idea that if Earth doesn't control its greenhouse gases, we'll end up at that temperature.

    My concern is that there isn't enough to write about on this. In addition, I am worried that it'll become too much of an Environmental dissertation, and that universities won't take me as a Physics applicant, but more of a Renewable Engineering student or something along those lines.

    So please let me know if you feel this is an apt topic for an Astrophysics applicant to write about!
    If not, what would you consider a good topic to research?
    How about picking one of these?

    • The Philosophy of Astrophysics
    • Astrophysical Laws
    • Black-Body Radiation, Thermal Equilibrium
    • Radiative Transport
    • Radiative Transport, Opacity, Absorption, Emission
    • Gravity: Conservations Laws, Orbits
    • Gravity, Virial Theorem, Tides, Hydrostatic Equilibrium
    • Stars: Basic Properties, Structure
    • Stellar Physics
    • Stellar Evolution, the HR Diagram
    • Chemical Dependence and Evolution, First Light
    • Star Formation and Star Death
    • White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes
    • Interstellar Medium
    • Components of the ISM
    • Heating and Cooling
    • Gas Dynamics, Shocks and Magnetic Fields
    • Basic Principles of Cosmology
    • Models: Hot Big Bang
    • Cosmological Parameters Expansion rate (H0)
    • Dark Matter, Accelerating universe Inflation and Concordance Cosmology cont.
    • Large-Scale Structure, Backgrounds, Inflation
    • Structure: Ellipticals, spirals
    • The Milky Way: Rotation curves, density waves
    • Populations and Evolution
    • Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN)

    Remember the whole idea of the EPQ is to look into something you don't know anything about
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    (Original post by liquid394)
    How about picking one of these?

    • The Philosophy of Astrophysics
    • Astrophysical Laws
    • Black-Body Radiation, Thermal Equilibrium
    • Radiative Transport
    • Radiative Transport, Opacity, Absorption, Emission
    • Gravity: Conservations Laws, Orbits
    • Gravity, Virial Theorem, Tides, Hydrostatic Equilibrium
    • Stars: Basic Properties, Structure
    • Stellar Physics
    • Stellar Evolution, the HR Diagram
    • Chemical Dependence and Evolution, First Light
    • Star Formation and Star Death
    • White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes
    • Interstellar Medium
    • Components of the ISM
    • Heating and Cooling
    • Gas Dynamics, Shocks and Magnetic Fields
    • Basic Principles of Cosmology
    • Models: Hot Big Bang
    • Cosmological Parameters Expansion rate (H0)
    • Dark Matter, Accelerating universe Inflation and Concordance Cosmology cont.
    • Large-Scale Structure, Backgrounds, Inflation
    • Structure: Ellipticals, spirals
    • The Milky Way: Rotation curves, density waves
    • Populations and Evolution
    • Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN)

    Remember the whole idea of the EPQ is to look into something you don't know anything about
    Thanks for this list, I shall do some ample googling on each of them before I decide what to do!
    Can I ask where you took it from? Or was it a self written list?
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    While that subject does concentrate on an extraterrestrial planet, and thus the study of it falls within the category of planetary astrophysics, the specific topics that you're looking to relate, seem more relevant to general atmospheric physics, rather than astrophysics itself.

    I'd try and look at something more cosmological (although perhaps I'm biased because that's the general direction I took with my degree!)
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    You may find it useful as a way of stimulating your thoughts or interests further to take a look at this website's Astrophysics page. It contains a hundred or so questions and answers relating to astrophysics. The questions are to the point and the answers are brief. Something here might grab your interest and you feel like you want to take that idea further.

    http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/aphymis.html
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    (Original post by chapmouse)
    Thanks for this list, I shall do some ample googling on each of them before I decide what to do!
    Can I ask where you took it from? Or was it a self written list?
    It's a list of what was covered on a course done in America, I was meant to show my brother as he was interested in astrophysics but I forgot at the time :L If you would like the link please ask
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    (Original post by chapmouse)
    Hi guys, hoping this is the right place to post this.

    So basically, I'm looking to apply for Physics w/ Astrophysics at university (at some places, straight astro) and in sight of this, I want to construct my Extended Project around the field.
    On my application to do the epq (thats how my school runs it) I wrote that I want to investigate the climate on Venus, and the ways in which that should influence environmental action on Earth.
    For anyone interested:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Essentially this revolves around the fact that Venus is pretty much the twin planet to Earth. They have virtually the same composition, and Venus is only a little smaller, but the typical temperature on Venus is 450 degrees celsius. This is primarily due to the runaway greenhouse effect on Venus.
    My EPQ would focus on the runaway greenhouse effect, and the idea that if Earth doesn't control its greenhouse gases, we'll end up at that temperature.

    My concern is that there isn't enough to write about on this. In addition, I am worried that it'll become too much of an Environmental dissertation, and that universities won't take me as a Physics applicant, but more of a Renewable Engineering student or something along those lines.

    So please let me know if you feel this is an apt topic for an Astrophysics applicant to write about!
    If not, what would you consider a good topic to research?
    This you may like just thinking about astrophysics reminded me that nasa have a dedicated area on their science webpage on astrophysics
    http://science.nasa.gov/
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    (Original post by chapmouse)
    Hi guys, hoping this is the right place to post this.

    So basically, I'm looking to apply for Physics w/ Astrophysics at university (at some places, straight astro) and in sight of this, I want to construct my Extended Project around the field.
    On my application to do the epq (thats how my school runs it) I wrote that I want to investigate the climate on Venus, and the ways in which that should influence environmental action on Earth.
    For anyone interested:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Essentially this revolves around the fact that Venus is pretty much the twin planet to Earth. They have virtually the same composition, and Venus is only a little smaller, but the typical temperature on Venus is 450 degrees celsius. This is primarily due to the runaway greenhouse effect on Venus.
    My EPQ would focus on the runaway greenhouse effect, and the idea that if Earth doesn't control its greenhouse gases, we'll end up at that temperature.

    My concern is that there isn't enough to write about on this. In addition, I am worried that it'll become too much of an Environmental dissertation, and that universities won't take me as a Physics applicant, but more of a Renewable Engineering student or something along those lines.

    So please let me know if you feel this is an apt topic for an Astrophysics applicant to write about!
    If not, what would you consider a good topic to research?
    I was originally going to do an Astrophysics based EPQ, but my head of sixth (also my Physics teacher) suggested that my topics were a bit wooly and that I may be better off researching something else. Your topic sounds far better than mine did when I started, though, so I'd suggest you just run with it and see where it goes. There's plenty of material on Venus' atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, global warming and general atmospheric science that you can sink your teeth into, and you can still relate it to astrophysics by looking at factors such as Venus' proximity to the sun and so forth.

    The main idea of the EPQ is to do something you have no previous exposure too, so that you can display independent learning skills and the ability to use sources effectively. I decided to do a more theoretical project comparing elementary Quantum Mechanics to Maxwell's Equations in the end. I had to get stuck into LOADS of Maths and Physics textbooks, watched a ton of lectures on youtube and read magazines/articles that related to the topic, but that's what the whole idea of the project is. Source evaluation and independent research.

    As long as you have a wide variety of sources which you can evaluate when asked and the topic is reasonably complex, you should get a high grade for your project. I hope it goes well!
 
 
 
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