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Government to overhaul young driver rules in bid to improve safety and cut insurance Watch

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    Young drivers could benefit from improved training and lower insurance premiums as the government confirmed its intention to launch a green paper on improving the safety and reducing risks to young drivers.

    The proposals were unveiled today at a summit for the motor insurance industry, hosted by the Department for Transport. Representatives from the Ministry of Justice, Department for Health and consumer organisation uSwitch were also present. The government is expecting the changes to result in a reduction in the high cost of vehicle insurance currently facing motorists – especially young drivers.

    A green paper looking at a range of options for improving the safety of newly-qualified drivers will be published later in the spring. Among the proposals being considered are:

    • a minimum learning period before candidates are permitted to sit their test


    • enabling learner drivers to take lessons on motorways, and perhaps during adverse weather conditions or during darkness to encourage greater practice prior to taking a test

    • increasing the existing probationary period from 2 to 3 years for a new driver’s licence to be revoked if they receive 6 or more penalty points

    • making the driving test more rigorous to better prepare learners to drive unsupervised

    • incentives for young drivers to take up additional training after passing their test.


    The government is also considering the possibility of imposing temporary restrictions on newly qualified drivers and further details will be included for discussion when the green paper is published.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/g...nsurance-costs
    What do you guys think about this?
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    I think it sounds reasonable what they are planning on doing.
    Statistically young people are far more likely to be involved in crashes and hopefully this should help reduce this and make the roads safer for everyone...
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    Hell naw with the restrictions - I understand the learning period but I don't agree with it :P


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    I think its quite a good change, especially learning on the motorway as I really struggled with this and was terrified when I first passed my test
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    I'm not so much concerned with these proposals, as they don't affect me, but there's no chance in hell that it'll lower insurance premiums. PassPlus was meant to do that when it was introduced, but now? It makes eff-all difference to your premium if you have it. Insurance Companies are too big to be controlled by the government in that way, and they make too much money.

    All that'll happen is that people spend more time and even more money on learning to pass their test, and in doing so become better drivers, but see absolutely no return for it from insurance companies.
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    enabling learner drivers to take lessons on motorways, and perhaps during adverse weather conditions or during darkness to encourage greater practice prior to taking a test
    Don't understand why this isn't already done.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Don't understand why this isn't already done.
    The motorways one is obvious because the good people of Cornwall and Norfolk will be stuck
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    (Original post by Y333EEE)
    The motorways one is obvious because the good people of Cornwall and Norfolk will be stuck
    Motorways wont be part of the test or learning requirement it'll just enable leaners drivers to go on them.

    I live in Plymouth and the closest motorway is the M5, nearly 60 miles away.

    The A38 is more difficult and scary than motorways anyway.
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    I was sent a survey by the DSA a few weeks ago asking me, as a 'young driver' all manner of questions relating to how safe I consider myself on the road. I may be young but I wasn't born yesterday. I knew they would use the results to try and justify further restricting new drivers' rights aspaying road users. I didn't play ball and answered the survey accordingly.

    We want young people to get jobs and stuff yet we are making it harder for young. people to use the roafs. Utterly bizarre.

    HM Government need to stop listening to fake charities likle Brake and join the real world.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    I'm not so much concerned with these proposals, as they don't affect me, but there's no chance in hell that it'll lower insurance premiums. PassPlus was meant to do that when it was introduced, but now? It makes eff-all difference to your premium if you have it. Insurance Companies are too big to be controlled by the government in that way, and they make too much money.

    All that'll happen is that people spend more time and even more money on learning to pass their test, and in doing so become better drivers, but see absolutely no return for it from insurance companies.
    I totally agree. Claiming that these changes will lower insurance premiums is ludicrous.


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    The minimum learning period is absurd, all it will do is cost learners more and probably teach them nothing more. I passed with 3 months of turning 17 and haven't had an accident three years later, and that minimum period would have done is cost me more money for some bloke to sit next to me while I driver around town for an hour.

    It won't lower insurance premiums either as driving without an instructor sat next to you is what makes the difference, not how long they sat next to you for.
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    The motorways one would be problematic for many people who don't live in the centre line of England. Dual carriageway awareness would have to be used in place of that... Which I guess is generally fine for many situations.

    I'm 50/50 on the minimum driving time - I passed my test in 3 months and a couple of days, and have never even scratched the car. I like to think that I'm pretty safe. That said, some take 6 months or longer and crash in their first week. I think there should be a minimum amount of time with an instructor (I do not believe that driving with a parent as the tutor is at all safe) so that they can make sure the driver has learnt things properly.

    It might make sense to allow 16.5 year olds to start learning as many are eager to pass as soon as they reach 17 - If you start 6 months early, you could pass on the day of your birthday and not feel rushed to pass like you may be with the current rules.


    In terms of reducing insurance, there are a lot of things that I'd rather they do - For instance, starting with a "benefit of the doubt" level of insurance for new drivers. The statistics may be stacked against young and new drivers, but it punishes those who are perfectly fine at driving.

    I'd rather they remove certain assumptions until they prove true - I have never crashed, yet they still suspect that I will, so they charge me a premium to accommodate for that. Charging £2000-£3000 for a new driver is just ridiculous. They should start at a reasonable rate (say, the £1000 mark, maybe less. Some can get that low in their first year anyway) and then only charge you more if you prove to be an unsafe driver.

    There is very little in the way of personalised insurance. You just put yourself in X,Y,Z catagories and are charged a fortune for the mistakes of others. Hopefully the reduced cost of claims will have some effect, but they might just take that as a way to charge more to make up for their losses.
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    Really?

    What about the other stupid reasons why insurance premiums are so expensive, middlemen selling on info, overpriced lawyers trying to make as much money as they can, etc

    And what about other drivers who clearly shouldn't be driving......even when I was learning to drive, there are some poor drivers, especially minicabbers in London, utter disregard for everyone else so they can make money.
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    To be honest I find it striking that we still don't assess drivers on adverse weather conditions. You only have to look at the number of accidents snow, ice, and slush has caused this side of the year to realise we're just under-prepared for weather we know we're going to have for years at a time in cycles. Same with night-time driving. Similarly for motorways; learner drivers should be allowed on but they should also be assessed at motorway driving. The amount of middle-lane crawlers and undertaking you see takes the mick, and often lead to accidents.

    It's not even about the insurance; it's about safety. It's too easy to learn to the test in the UK.
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    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    Really?

    What about the other stupid reasons why insurance premiums are so expensive, middlemen selling on info, overpriced lawyers trying to make as much money as they can, etc

    And what about other drivers who clearly shouldn't be driving......even when I was learning to drive, there are some poor drivers, especially minicabbers in London, utter disregard for everyone else so they can make money.
    Some of those legal matters are covered in the Gov report in that link. The paper is split between improving younger drivers and how to generally lower insurance premiums.


    I, and a few others, have said we wouldn't be totally against re-qualifications for drivers. Say, 10 years (less for those with points) or when you renew the picture on your card. Testing to the driving test standards would not be good as the methods they test aren't always the best - As a driver, I learnt to improve upon the groundwork that the lessons gave me.

    But in general, a test to prove competence and general safety behind the wheel would be fine with me. If you fail, you retry, do lessons or, worst-case scenario, lose the licence.
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    (Original post by Camoxide)
    Motorways wont be part of the test or learning requirement it'll just enable leaners drivers to go on them.

    I live in Plymouth and the closest motorway is the M5, nearly 60 miles away.

    The A38 is more difficult and scary than motorways anyway.
    In what way? I live near Exeter and go down Plymouth way a fair bit and the A38 seems fine to me. If you want a real challenge head to some of the narrow coastal roads in Cornwall
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    I passed 1 month after turning 17. That minimum learner time is silly, waste of money.
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    (Original post by Y333EEE)
    In what way? I live near Exeter and go down Plymouth way a fair bit and the A38 seems fine to me. If you want a real challenge head to some of the narrow coastal roads in Cornwall
    Can't relax, constant bends, accidents happen too often, some of the slip roads are pretty bad (especially manadon roundabout), gets worse when you get into cornwall especially the dual carriageway bits where people can cross over.
    Had someone pull out of the central reservation in front of me once when I was doing 70!!! idiots. Only just managed to to swerve around them.

    But yeah. That's why I don't like the A38.

    I have driven down narrow country lanes in Cornwall as well (I also live in cornwall). They're not too bad. It's just praying that theres nothing coming round those tight bends.
    I've been down a B road once and then this massive coach comes round the bend at some speed.
    Bricks were ****.
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    These proposals sound very good to me. A few of them could actually be of some benefit to young drivers, e.g. motorway driving experience. And none of them could really have a negative affect, unlike previous proposals of curfews, lower speed limits, passenger limits, etc.

    However, I seriously doubt this will have any effect on the rather serious problem of the minority of appalling young drivers. This is because the problem is not with the test, but the people. These drivers have proven that they are capable of driving to a safe and legal standard, but they choose not to. No amount of changes to the test will change this. Neither will curfews and speed limits - these drivers break most road traffic laws so why would they obey new ones?
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    As a new driver I'd pretty much agree with all of this. Much better than ideas like a 'curfew'. However I also think people should be retested every 20 years or something, as there are actually some drivers on the road WORSE than me, which is quite terrifying considering I've only been driving 2 weeks.
 
 
 
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