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    So for all the people who want to travel the world/or some countries.

    Can the people who've actually done explain how they did it in terms of money and time.

    Then hopefully this will motivate more people to travel.


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    (Original post by non)
    So for all the people who want to travel the world/or some countries.

    Can the people who've actually done explain how they did it in terms of money and time.

    Then hopefully this will motivate more people to travel.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Hey

    I'm leaving for a 3 and a half month trip to SE Asia and Australia, in 2 weeks! Hopefully my first of many!

    £4000 in 4 months for me! Minimum wage of £5 an hour averages to 50hrs a week of money that goes towards travelling. Additional hours to pay for housekeeping and recreation. God i'm exhausted. 30 degrees and a sandy beach .. here I come!!
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    When I travelled around Europe after uni, I saved up for it with money from a part time job at Lush whilst I was studying.

    When I went to Krakow to do my CELTA I paid for it with a xmas temp job at BHS whilst living at home.

    When I got back I got a job teaching EFL at a summer school at a boarding school in London. I used the money from that to pay for my flights and first month living in South Korea. I worked as an EFL teacher for EPIK. Managed to save about £5000 in the year I was there. Went to Thailand for a bit but mostly I used the rest of it to live until I found a job when I got home. I came home in Sept 2011, however I know people who went the same time as me and have been travelling and working around the world since then.

    One guy worked in SK for 2 years, saved about £10,000 and he's spent the last few months travelling around SE Asia, now he's in India for 3 months and in May he goes to Uganda for 3 months to volunteer at an oprhanage before going to Australia to work.

    Another guy left the same time as me, went travelling for six months, then back to Korea for six months and is now working and travelling in Australia.

    I'm planning a trip to North America in the summer and I'm saving as much money as possible from my bursary to cover it. You can save up and go anywhere if you want to! You just need to be determined and willing to cut your spending where possible.
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    (Original post by Sarang_assa)

    When I got back I got a job teaching EFL at a summer school at a boarding school in London. I used the money from that to pay for my flights and first month living in South Korea. I worked as an EFL teacher for EPIK. Managed to save about £5000 in the year I was there. Went to Thailand for a bit but mostly I used the rest of it to live until I found a job when I got home. I came home in Sept 2011, however I know people who went the same time as me and have been travelling and working around the world since then.
    Hello! I see you taught in South Korea with EPIK? I just got accepted onto the programme and I was wondering if you could tell me what it was like teaching out there? I've never taught before and I hear they don't follow a syllabus which I find quite frightening! Did you enjoy your experience? I see so many scary stories online of bad experiences! Thanks!
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    (Original post by pillow)
    Hello! I see you taught in South Korea with EPIK? I just got accepted onto the programme and I was wondering if you could tell me what it was like teaching out there? I've never taught before and I hear they don't follow a syllabus which I find quite frightening! Did you enjoy your experience? I see so many scary stories online of bad experiences! Thanks!
    Congratulations!! Where abouts have you been placed?

    I had the best year out there and had so many incredible experiences in and out of school. I worked in 2 Primary schools, one Mon and Tue and the other for the rest of the week. If you work in a primary school you follow quite a strict curriculum with a text book. On the plus side it's all planned for you, you just need to adapt it and make it more interesting. The downside is that having such a set curriculum there isn't much room to stray from it.

    I think the main factor for whether you have a good time in school is your co-teacher and if the school embraces you. Take some gifts in on the first day to help make a good impression. I took something for my principal, vice principal and some little gifts for my co-teachers. Your co-teachers might have some quirks, but try and go with the flow, they're probably just as nervous as you.

    I don't think middle schools have a set curriculum, although some have text books. My friends who worked it middle/high school all shared ideas though, and you'll learn a lot during orientation.

    The most useful resource whilst I was out there was definitely www.waygook.org. You sign up and teachers all share lesson plans, games and ideas, so if you're told you're teaching a one off kindergarten lesson in half an hour, that'll be your lifesaver.

    I worked 25 lessons a week which is more than manageable. I worked from 8.30-4.30 but lessons started at 9 and finished at 2.30 at the latest so always had at least a couple of hours to plan lessons at the end of the day and rarely took work home. You may be asked to do after school clubs or extra duties which might make your day slightly different but anything over I think 24-25 lessons a week you get paid more. Within reason, I'd say do the extra bits as they'll all add to your experience. I taught a teachers class, did an English storytime broadcast to the whole school first thing and went on lots of trips with the teachers. Sometimes it can be a bit awkward and the last thing you want to do in your free time, but it's expected of you and most of the time ends up being more fun than you'd think!

    Really put yourself out there during orientation and try and get to know lots of people, not just from your city, but all over. I made friends who were going all over so usually had people to stay with and hang out with when travelling to their city.

    If you can learn a bit of Korean before you go that's great and will help but people got by with nothing but the basics. My district set up a free evening language class for EPIK teachers so I had 4 hours of Korean class a week which really helped. That's another thing I'd recommend if posible.

    Sorry this post turned out so long!! If you have any more specific questions let me know. I'm so excited for you!
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    (Original post by Sarang_assa)
    Congratulations!! Where abouts have you been placed?

    Sorry this post turned out so long!! If you have any more specific questions let me know. I'm so excited for you!
    Thank you so much for replying! The Info was VERY helpful and it sounds like you had a great time! your answers have actually put me at ease a bit! the gift idea is very good, did you bring these from home and what did you buy? (Sorry i sound so invasive but I would have no idea of whats appropriate and don't want to be in their bad books!)

    I believe i'm being placed in Seoul and in an elementary school hopefully! SO glad they will have a coursebook!!! Where did you teach? Did you go last year?

    Can I also ask whether like, the Co-teacher will do most of the teaching or do you actually do it? because I saw a video and the Co-teacher was actually the one heading the class while the foreign teachers were more like assistants, but then i hear stories where its the other way round!
    Also, Do we teach the children Grammar or do the korean teachers do it (which will be great cos I don't think i'm very good at it) and then we teach spoken English? Again, I hear so many diff stories! i'm just SO worried that my students will fail because i'll be a bad teacher, ive never taught before and the TEFL course im taking is a bit naff, I would never forgive myself if my students fail because of my bad teaching! Also, do we as teachers get evaluated somehow?

    This sounds so stupid, but is it easy to make friends over there? and during orientation? I've never gone abroad or lived by myself before and this is actually a major thing on my mind, being without friends and without family, although I do need to grow up haha

    I do apologise for all these questions!! I am so nervous about it all! I'm actually still in shock that I've been accepted:eek:
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    (Original post by pillow)
    Thank you so much for replying! The Info was VERY helpful and it sounds like you had a great time! your answers have actually put me at ease a bit! the gift idea is very good, did you bring these from home and what did you buy? (Sorry i sound so invasive but I would have no idea of whats appropriate and don't want to be in their bad books!)

    I believe i'm being placed in Seoul and in an elementary school hopefully! SO glad they will have a coursebook!!! Where did you teach? Did you go last year?

    Can I also ask whether like, the Co-teacher will do most of the teaching or do you actually do it? because I saw a video and the Co-teacher was actually the one heading the class while the foreign teachers were more like assistants, but then i hear stories where its the other way round!
    Also, Do we teach the children Grammar or do the korean teachers do it (which will be great cos I don't think i'm very good at it) and then we teach spoken English? Again, I hear so many diff stories! i'm just SO worried that my students will fail because i'll be a bad teacher, ive never taught before and the TEFL course im taking is a bit naff, I would never forgive myself if my students fail because of my bad teaching! Also, do we as teachers get evaluated somehow?

    This sounds so stupid, but is it easy to make friends over there? and during orientation? I've never gone abroad or lived by myself before and this is actually a major thing on my mind, being without friends and without family, although I do need to grow up haha

    I do apologise for all these questions!! I am so nervous about it all! I'm actually still in shock that I've been accepted:eek:
    Seoul is awesome, you'll love it!! I lived in Gwangju but visited Seoul plenty of times, if I went back I'd definitely like to live in Seoul, or possibly Busan. My favourite area is Hongdae, make sure you check it out!! I've put the rest under a spoiler so I don't bore other people!

    Spoiler:
    Show
    I was really nervous too, don't worry, it's normal. I was put on a wait list and only found out I was going two weeks before, I changed my mind about going so many times in those two weeks!

    Have a look on Facebook to see if anyone's set up an EPIK Summer 2013 group. I went Summer 2010 and there was a group of 400 of us on Facebook. Actually just checked for you and there's a group here - https://www.facebook.com/groups/1971...28694/?fref=ts it was so helpful and reassuring. I even arranged to meet 5 other people for drinks in Heathrow on the Facebook group, it really helped meeting people before I'd even left the UK.

    It's good when you get there too if you have any questions, and people organise events through it too.

    As for gifts, the only bits I brought from home were a few souveneirs with English bits ok them like the Union Jack Flag and a red bus etc - just pencils, badges, mini teddys, that kind of thing. I ended up giving those my co-teachers for their kids. For the staff gifts I just bought stuff from Paris Baguette (if you don't know what it is yet you'll soon find out ), I think I got a cake for my Principal and a box of biscuits for my vice principal ,it's just a gesture, nothing to worry about. I found a picture actually - the shortbread was for my co-teachers. I got it from Home Plus (which is basically Tesco).
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    How you and your CT teach will be entirely dependent upon then. I had 5 CT's and it worked differently with each. Some I would pretty much teach by myself, with them translating more difficult points and helping with behaviour management, sometimes they went off to do other things so I got to teach by myself, with others they would teach most of the lesson in Korean and I would be the parrot. Every relationship has its positive and negative points so don't worry too much because you really won't know until you meet them.

    Grammar isn't really a focus, I didn't find. Not in the way I learnt on my CELTA anyway, the lessons are pitched at a pretty low level. Over the course of a year there are about 12 units I think. Each unit is 4 lessons long, and most schools have 2 english classes a week so each unit lasts 2 weeks. I'm not sure if it's the same everywhere but I had each class once a week and my CT had them twice, so she'd teach 2 of the 4 lessons per unit solo.

    English isn't really seen as as important as other subjects, so don't worry too much about pressure with grades. In fact, when I was there English was once of the few subjects that didn't have lots of tests and rigorous grading, so students enjoyed it as it was a bit of a break for them and a chance for them to do something with less pressure. Generally all the assessment and data is handled by your CT as it's all in Korean.

    So to give you a bit of an idea of how the lessons work, this is rougly how a unit would be set out. I'll use one of my favourites (mainly because of the dance) as an example.

    Grade 5 Unit 9 - Whose Boat is this?

    Lesson 1
    Intro - maybe a game or video or ppt or role play to get their English brain turned on
    Look and Listen - short video clip using language, ask questions about the picture in the book, play video, ask questions, play video again, ask slightly more difficult questions.
    This is the video from the book when I was there but 99% sure it's been updated now. The second one is my personal favourite, I love Nami's pronunciation of the 'th' sound. One thing some teachers did was make their own videos, using the same dialogue with their waygook friends. The kids loved seeing them in the videos.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VE5-U_dqyc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=io8vdts5jC0
    Look and Speak - basically listen and repeat key phrases
    Let's play - some kind of activity or game using language, usually more listening than speaking the first time. One my kids liked was a pair game, they spread flashcards on the table, they put their hands on their head, you say the word relating to the picture, they have to grab the right picture first, they get a point, the person with the most points at the end wins.

    Lesson 2
    Intro
    Look and Listen
    - same as yesterday, slightly more language, maybe a few more key words/phrases
    Look and Speak - good to practice in paris, boys v girls, whatever
    Let's sing - they learn a song, sometimes a dance. If you don't like the one in the book there's usually alternatives and people put them up on Waygook. Here's an example of a song, this isn't the official dance but a lot of people use it because it's hilarious.

    Let's play - a bit more speaking in this one, my kids loved games like Pass the Ball and any kind of Bomb game (again, they're on Waygook.org)

    Lesson 3
    Intro
    Let's read - 2 or 3 reading exercises in the book. I liked to make it more interactive with a game. Have a word flash up on the screen quickly and children guess it, or put letters around the screen so children have to put the word together or slow reveal.
    Let's write 2 or 3 writing exercises - whiteboards and competitions make them more fun!
    Let's play - another game, consolidation

    Lesson 4
    Let's act - I don't know if it's the same now, but the 4th lesson was usually a role play. My CT would get the children into groups the lesson before, give them the script so they can practice and then during the lesson each group would perform. Some would go all out and make props and costumes.

    And that's pretty much it. Obviously there's some variations but they usually follow a similar pattern. If you get to do afternoon clubs there's a lot more freedom, and you'll do 2 weeks of camp in summer and winter. These weeks you can usually plan the entire week however you want. Lots of people have themed camps. Mine was an 'around the world' camp where each kid got a passport on the first day, we'd visit a different country each day and they'd get a stamp and we'd do activities themed around that country. So on Brazil day we made maracas and danced to Brazilian music, On Italian day we made ice cream using plastic bags, milk, ice and lots of shaking. We had an olympic sports day, watched Pixar animations, did the egg drop experiment. You can basically just have fun!! Someone planned an awesome looking Harry Potter themed camp too.

    As far as evaluations go, they're nothing to worry about. They have things called open classes in Korea. I had 4 or 5 whilst I was there, they can be just for the school, for teachers in the district, for parents. Basically they're planned in advance and people come and watch you teach. The scariest one I had was a district one, there were 30 teachers there, including my principal and vice principal. But it was fine, and they're not watching you as much as your CT. That's the only kind of assessment we got as far as I can remember.

    And as for making friends, join the Facebook group, mingle during orientation and especially in the first few weeks, either go out to things arranged by other people, or arrange activites yourself. Just put yourself out there and you'll be fine, especially in Seoul, there'll literally be hundreds/thousands of you. Orientation was so much fun, the days were long but get out at night and experience Korea at night. We had ours on a university campus. There were about 2 bars and we took them over for the whole week. Soju helps any kind of bonding!

    It doesn't matter what you're into, you'll find something you enjoy to take part in. Gwangju was much smaller than Seoul and we had regular nights out, there was a book club, a 'Stitch and *****' knitting club, charity fundraisers you can get involved with, a magazine you can write articles for, a running hash club, all organised and for waygooks. You will miss your family but make the most of Skype, and within no time you all feel like a new Korean family. Things like Christmas and Thanksgiving you celebrate together. For Christmas 12 of us went to one girls house in the sticks, we all stayed over on Christmas eve and Christmas day and had a proper Xmas dinner, exchanged presents, played charades, watched xmas films, it was one of my best xmas's ever. And before Xmas eve, I only knew one of the 12 people but by the end of it I felt like I'd know them forever.

    Sorry this post is soooo long, once you start remincisng, it's hard to stop please feel free to ask more questions if you have any (I promise next time I'll make my answers shorter). And when you're there if you ever want any help, or advice or lesson plans or resources just let me know and I'll see what I've got on my hard drive.



    Ooh one last thing. http://www.eatyourkimchi.com/ do great videos about Korea and it's culture if you want to learn more. A lot of the videos they shoot are in Seoul too so you'll get to see more of your new home! xx
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    I spent £9 on the train to Paignton and back.
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    (Original post by Sarang_assa)
    Seoul is awesome, you'll love it!! I lived in Gwangju but visited Seoul plenty of times, if I went back I'd definitely like to live in Seoul, or possibly Busan. My favourite area is Hongdae, make sure you check it out!! I've put the rest under a spoiler so I don't bore other people!

    Ooh one last thing. http://www.eatyourkimchi.com/ do great videos about Korea and it's culture if you want to learn more. A lot of the videos they shoot are in Seoul too so you'll get to see more of your new home! xx
    Thanks again! I'll definitely join the FB page! I'm a naturally 'reserved' type of person so I hope that won't stop me making friends! I definitely got to learn to get out there and go with it.
    I know a lot of experiences depend on luck too, hopefully luck is on my side and I'll be in a nice school with nice co-teachers!
    and Wow! you did a CELTA course! I'm just doing an online one although i'm contemplating doing a weekend course too.
    Thanks sooooooooo much for your reply again! you'be been so nice and helpful! And you're going to regret letting me ask you more questions because I can see myself bombarding you with questions the week before and whilst i'm there haha But I might PM you instead, cos i'll probably annoy the thread starter haha
    Thanks again!!! xx
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    I saved up £1000 working as a horse trainer in Germany for a few months.

    Obviously, it's not a lot. But it was enough to let me live in the alps for 3 months.
    I wanted to relive the Christopher Mccandless experience, who is a massive hero of mine and motivator. Honestly, if you're thinking of travelling, just read his biography. It was more than enough to get me moving.

    I lived in a tent for 5 months alone, hitchhiking across France, Switzerland and Italy. I ate basic food. Had about 3 t-shirts and 2 pairs of trousers, 2 pairs of boots and a coat. Along with a few emergency supplies. That was it. I'm a girl, and was 20 at the time, so it was quite a scary experience. But I wanted to prove to my family and to everybody I knew that these kinds of adventures aren't just for the guys. I had pepper spray and a knife on me at all times, and only had to use them once. Which is pretty good going, in my opinion.

    But it just shows that you don't need money to travel. These £8,000 tours and crap isn't all there is to do, you can wing it on your own and probably have 10 times as much of an experience.
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    (Original post by klipsan)
    I saved up £1000 working as a horse trainer in Germany for a few months.

    Obviously, it's not a lot. But it was enough to let me live in the alps for 3 months.
    I wanted to relive the Christopher Mccandless experience, who is a massive hero of mine and motivator. Honestly, if you're thinking of travelling, just read his biography. It was more than enough to get me moving.

    I lived in a tent for 5 months alone, hitchhiking across France, Switzerland and Italy. I ate basic food. Had about 3 t-shirts and 2 pairs of trousers, 2 pairs of boots and a coat. Along with a few emergency supplies. That was it. I'm a girl, and was 20 at the time, so it was quite a scary experience. But I wanted to prove to my family and to everybody I knew that these kinds of adventures aren't just for the guys. I had pepper spray and a knife on me at all times, and only had to use them once. Which is pretty good going, in my opinion.

    But it just shows that you don't need money to travel. These £8,000 tours and crap isn't all there is to do, you can wing it on your own and probably have 10 times as much of an experience.
    I wish more people would be like you, too many people now and scared of hitchhiking and the like because of all the tattle tale stories they hear, i'm going to hitchhike Europe this summer hitchhiking and couchsurfing. Hopefully i'll bump into a few more travellers!
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    (Original post by shezshez)
    I wish more people would be like you, too many people now and scared of hitchhiking and the like because of all the tattle tale stories they hear, i'm going to hitchhike Europe this summer hitchhiking and couchsurfing. Hopefully i'll bump into a few more travellers!
    Couchsurfing is great! I only used it a handful of times (not much internet connection in the alps, lol), and had a varied experience. But altogether, everyone is so willing to help you out and show you around. But hitchhiking is definitely the best way to meet people. Out of over the 200 cars I must've ridden in, only one was a bad egg. Just shows. But you meet such amazing, loving people that way.

    Obviously, all it takes is one bad car and you could easily be dead... yeah... but it all depends on how willing you are to make that risk.
 
 
 
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