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The Physics PHYA2 thread! 5th June 2013 Watch

  • View Poll Results: What mark do you think you got out of 70?
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    Hoping for a paper most heavily based around waves this time round. Waves I'm absolutely fine with, but I cannot do mechanics for the life of me. About 80% of my lost marks are in the Mechanics section.

    Also, anybody done the June 2009 paper? What an absolute piece of satan
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    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    Hoping for a paper most heavily based around waves this time round. Waves I'm absolutely fine with, but I cannot do mechanics for the life of me. About 80% of my lost marks are in the Mechanics section.

    Also, anybody done the June 2009 paper? What an absolute piece of satan
    Lol yeh i prefer the waves and materials bits but i like the theory behind the mechanics like newtons laws etc and moments its just suvat questions with projectiles that i loose marks on but im getting better at projectiles now lol


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    (Original post by masryboy94)
    this word document is SO useful, pretty much goes through EVERYTHING for PHYA2 ... can't attach it here because file too big, but for anyone struggling or just wants to look at notes .. seriously check this out :

    http://getrevising.co.uk/resources/m...phya2_revision
    Thanks! But I think my nelson thornes is MUCH BETTER!
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    (Original post by That_Clever_Guy)
    Lol yeh i prefer the waves and materials bits but i like the theory behind the mechanics like newtons laws etc and moments its just suvat questions with projectiles that i loose marks on but im getting better at projectiles now lol


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    Hey! Remember me? Unit 1? How is it going? How is your revision going? I am already feeling very confident m8. And you will notice that I have helped a lot of people in this thread. If you need any help? As me anytime!
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    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    Hoping for a paper most heavily based around waves this time round. Waves I'm absolutely fine with, but I cannot do mechanics for the life of me. About 80% of my lost marks are in the Mechanics section.

    Also, anybody done the June 2009 paper? What an absolute piece of satan
    June 2009 was the easiest paper! But the grade boundaries were also the highest.
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    June 2009 was the easiest paper! But the grade boundaries were also the highest.
    How on Earth! I thought it was ridiculous scraped a B on that one. Had a double take when I saw the boundary was 56!

    I'm hoping the coursework boundaries are low this year, I got 59/70 in the Jan exam but only 29/50 in the coursework, so I'm really gonna have to push it for this one
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    Hey! Remember me? Unit 1? How is it going? How is your revision going? I am already feeling very confident m8. And you will notice that I have helped a lot of people in this thread. If you need any help? As me anytime!
    Nah sorry mate not being rude or anything but i ain't quite sure who you are but yeh revision is going well thanks hows your revision coming along?


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    (Original post by posthumus)
    An electron can act as a wave too and diffract, you can find it's wavelength using the de broglie wavelength formula,
    lambda = h/mv

    ... but I don't think you need to know it for this unit
    Oh PHEW! But does it act the same as when light is diffracted. I mean by if the wavelength is small then then it would change the fringe spacing accordingly?
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    (Original post by Currentlysmilin)
    Oh PHEW! But does it act the same as when light is diffracted. I mean by if the wavelength is small then then it would change the fringe spacing accordingly?
    Yup, it acts just like your typical wave (remember, wave-particle duality). The wavelength of the electron is dependent on it's velocity (inverse relationship).

    You'd have to be told the electrons velocity... but like I said, I don't think it will come up not in the spec for the unit. You may come across it at A2
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    (Original post by NedStark)
    So the central red graph represents the diffraction grating?

    If so, what does the large blue curve and dotted red curve represent? Young's double slit? Really confused as to what each one is.
    It represents the different Wavelengths. As it says in the book 'using the expressions above' Its shows equations varying the length of the wavelength (spotting the difference between the two equations) The other one is one the page before.
    The width of the central fringe is larger is the wavelength is larger and this is represented by the blue fat curve. And the thin curve represents the smaller wavelength of the light.
    Get it or still stuck?
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    (Original post by posthumus)
    Yup, it acts just like your typical wave (remember, wave-particle duality). The wavelength of the electron is dependent on it's velocity (inverse relationship).

    You'd have to be told the electrons velocity... but like I said, I don't think it will come up not in the spec for the unit. You may come across it at A2
    Okay! Thankyou
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    For refraction, am I right in thinking that light of different wave lengths would be refracted by different amounts?

    and if so, why?
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    (Original post by fuzzybear)
    For refraction, am I right in thinking that light of different wave lengths would be refracted by different amounts?

    and if so, why?
    Yes light of different wavelengths are diffracted by different amounts. For example red and blue light. They are diffracted by different amounts and produce fringe patterns. The fringe patterns produced are different due to the wavelengths.
    U don't need to know why.
    U just need to know that the longer the wavelength the greater the fringe patterns...

    Any help at all??

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    I cant find the June 2009 paper? please could someone link me? Thanks
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    Thanks! But I think my nelson thornes is MUCH BETTER!
    i hate nelson thornes its amazing for questions but very bad for explanations
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    (Original post by pilotluke1)
    I cant find the June 2009 paper? please could someone link me? Thanks
    here you go
    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdf physics_u2_qp_june_2009.pdf (392.6 KB, 43 views)
  2. File Type: pdf june_09_ms.pdf (169.2 KB, 59 views)
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    (Original post by masryboy94)
    here you go
    thank you!
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    (Original post by SortYourLife)
    This is jut rough aha:

    You'd have two wires of equal length (measured with a ruler) suspended, measuring the diameter of the one you want to determine youngs modulus for with a micrometer, in several places to get an average

    You'd have a set of weights to apply a force to the wire you want to determine the Young's modulus for, the other wire is purely for control, due to temperature changes or whatever.

    You'd apply different forces and note down the force applied and the extension of the wire, measured with the one I've forgotten the name of, starts with a v maybe? And take a few readings with an average found

    Do this for at least 6 forces.

    Plot a graph of force on the y axis and extension on the x, should be a straight line.

    Young's modulus is (force*original length) / (extension*cross sectionalarea)

    You'd find the area using the diameter before and A=(Pi) r^2 for a circle.

    The gradient of the graph sorts out the force over extension, so you'd take the gradient, multiply by the original length of the wire, and divide by the cross sectional area

    Something like that anyways, there may be more points you need to get in
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    For the v were you on about vernea caliber?
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    Hey! Remember me? Unit 1? How is it going? How is your revision going? I am already feeling very confident m8. And you will notice that I have helped a lot of people in this thread. If you need any help? As me anytime!
    What you most worried about in Unit 2 & how was your sociology exam?
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    (Original post by Qari)
    For the v were you on about vernea caliber?
    yeh that is what he is talking about, vernier calliper. he also forgot to say when using  \pi (\frac{D}{2})^2 to find the cross sectional area, to find the diameter (D) you would use a micrometer, that is one mark.
 
 
 
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