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The Physics PHYA2 thread! 5th June 2013 Watch

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    (Original post by Davelittle)
    someone posted a .pdf or a word .doc at the start of this thread with a list of definitions on
    Could someone please repost the PDF? I can't seem to find it

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    (Original post by x-Sophie-x)
    Could someone please repost the PDF? I can't seem to find it

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    I'd like this too

    Thanks !
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    (Original post by Davelittle)
    SinC=n2/n1 where n1>n2

    The critical angle is the incident angle at which the refracted ray will travel across the boundary of the substances. Any more than the critical angle and total internal reflection will occur.
    thanks, and can you show us how to derive fringe spacing equation
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    i'm lost on renewable energy, i don't understand how you get the equation:
    0.5pv3​A for wind power? can anyone help?!
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    Can some one help me with Q6aii) PHYA2 JUNE 12, if you could, thanks!
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    How do you prove diffraction grating formula simply? So very confused.

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    Any idea as to what the 6marker may be on?
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    What are the basics we need to know about path difference?
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    GUUUYS

    is d in a diffraction grating measured in mm ? or m
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    (Original post by x-Sophie-x)
    How do you prove diffraction grating formula simply? So very confused.

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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...age=54&page=54

    there's some writing there and a picture.
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    (Original post by vengeance111)
    GUUUYS

    is d in a diffraction grating measured in mm ? or m
    In Physics.... meters is the standard unit for length, always
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    alright everyone, time to go to sleep
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    Right I have to calculate the energy stored in a copper wire by looking at a strain-stress graph, I have counted the number of squares under the graph, now what???


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    (Original post by Jimmy20002012)
    Right I have to calculate the energy stored in a copper wire by looking at a strain-stress graph, I have counted the number of squares under the graph, now what???


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    Which question m8?
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    (Original post by masryboy94)
    alright everyone, time to go to sleep
    Alright brother! Have a great sleep and best of luck!
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    Can anyone help with June 2012 Q6aii?
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    Which question m8?
    Jan 12 4ei, thanks


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    (Original post by Boop.)
    Can some one help me with Q6aii) PHYA2 JUNE 12, if you could, thanks!
    page 183 of nelson thornes textbook

    in the green text box:

    ''phase difference between two particles is equal to m(pi), where m is the number of nodes between the particles''

    but remember if its an even number of pi, then the two particles are effectively in phase, meaning the phase difference between them is zero

    THIS ONLY APPLIES TO STATIONARY WAVES!!!!!

    its different for progressive waves
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    (Original post by Jimmy20002012)
    Jan 12 4ei, thanks


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    so, what is the number of blocks you got?
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    When describing an experiment looking at stress and strain, is it okay to assume gravity = 10 newtons per kilogram? So that when you add masses on, you are adding a 100g mass which is a 1N force?
    Sorry if I'm not being clear.

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