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    I do not understand the precise meaning of:














    de + le = du de + les = des
    à + le = au à + les = aux




    I kinda get that they might be used when saying stuff like: to go 'to the' market or: talking 'about' this.

    Anyway, I'm not sure when to use du from au, or even just use le, ur un, and same with the feminine ones, and same with the plural ones.

    An example might make this a more comprehensible post, sorry!

    Eg:
    un muffin au chocolat

    Why not say: un muffin le/du chocolat
    ie: a muffin with (the/some) chocolate
    ??!!

    And if 'je vais aller au marché' means 'I am going to go to the market' then why does 'je parle du marché' mean (unless I translated incorrectly) 'I am talking about the market' when 'du' means 'some'? Shouldn't it thus be 'I am talking some market'...which obvs doesn't make sense, hence why I am confused as heck!! And I have a written test in French in about 12 hours time D:

    Does de les = des mean 'with the' (for plural things)?
    Thus de le = du means 'with the' aswell as some, depending on the context?

    And why is it okay to say a coke and not some coke (when ordering)?

    Arghghfkghl D:

    Merci!
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    (Original post by PhysicsGal)
    I do not understand the precise meaning of:














    de + le = du de + les = des
    à + le = au à + les = aux




    I kinda get that they might be used when saying stuff like: to go 'to the' market or: talking 'about' this.

    Anyway, I'm not sure when to use du from au, or even just use le, ur un, and same with the feminine ones, and same with the plural ones.

    An example might make this a more comprehensible post, sorry!

    Eg:
    un muffin au chocolat

    Why not say: un muffin le/du chocolat
    ie: a muffin with (the/some) chocolate
    ??!!

    And if 'je vais aller au marché' means 'I am going to go to the market' then why does 'je parle du marché' mean (unless I translated incorrectly) 'I am talking about the market' when 'du' means 'some'? Shouldn't it thus be 'I am talking some market'...which obvs doesn't make sense, hence why I am confused as heck!! And I have a written test in French in about 12 hours time D:

    Does de les = des mean 'with the' (for plural things)?
    Thus de le = du means 'with the' aswell as some, depending on the context?

    And why is it okay to say a coke and not some coke (when ordering)?

    Arghghfkghl D:

    Merci!
    My french teacher explains this with a song (to the tune of "camptown ladies sing this song doo daaa doo daa")

    Unspecified amounts in French du, de la, du, de la
    Unspecified amounts in French du, de la, du, de la, des

    so it's really when there is no set amount like 3 or "lots of"

    "Il y a beaucoup de gens"
    "Il y a des gens"

    So if you do not specify a sort of amount of the things then you use them I dont know if this made much sense but hopefully it did!

    Unfortunately I am not sure about the au, aux etc haha
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    (Original post by hattiemcbinky)
    My french teacher explains this with a song (to the tune of "camptown ladies sing this song doo daaa doo daa")

    Unspecified amounts in French du, de la, du, de la
    Unspecified amounts in French du, de la, du, de la, des

    so it's really when there is no set amount like 3 or "lots of"

    "Il y a beaucoup de gens"
    "Il y a des gens"

    So if you do not specify a sort of amount of the things then you use them I dont know if this made much sense but hopefully it did!

    Unfortunately I am not sure about the au, aux etc haha
    Got that song in my head! Which is good, merci
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    (Original post by PhysicsGal)
    I do not understand the precise meaning of:














    de + le = du de + les = des
    à + le = au à + les = aux




    I kinda get that they might be used when saying stuff like: to go 'to the' market or: talking 'about' this.

    Anyway, I'm not sure when to use du from au, or even just use le, ur un, and same with the feminine ones, and same with the plural ones.

    An example might make this a more comprehensible post, sorry!

    Eg:
    un muffin au chocolat

    Why not say: un muffin le/du chocolat
    ie: a muffin with (the/some) chocolate
    ??!!

    And if 'je vais aller au marché' means 'I am going to go to the market' then why does 'je parle du marché' mean (unless I translated incorrectly) 'I am talking about the market' when 'du' means 'some'? Shouldn't it thus be 'I am talking some market'...which obvs doesn't make sense, hence why I am confused as heck!! And I have a written test in French in about 12 hours time D:

    Does de les = des mean 'with the' (for plural things)?
    Thus de le = du means 'with the' aswell as some, depending on the context?

    And why is it okay to say a coke and not some coke (when ordering)?

    Arghghfkghl D:

    Merci!
    Le/la/les are definite articles - they mean 'the' in English and are used in mostly the same contexts. Which one you use depends on the gender of the noun and whether it is singular or plural. So la table (feminine) vs. le rocher (masculine) vs les tables (feminine plural) etc. You'll just have to learn the genders of nouns I'm afraid. Note that often English will drop the definite article where French keeps it - "I hate rain" = "Je déteste la pluie"

    au/à la/aux: au and aux are contractions of à + le and à + les respectively while there is no contraction with à la. These correspond broadly with 'to the' in English, hence "Je vais au marché" = I'm going to the market.
    It's not just about places though, you use this whenever a verb followed by à is then followed by a definite article (Je pense aux vacances = I'm thinking about the holidays")

    However, often 'au/à la/aux' are also used to link a noun with another noun that describes a long term physical property of the first noun: "un muffin au chocolat" - the very nature of a chocolate muffin is to have chocolate in it, so we use au. It's also why they say "L'homme au grand nez" (Big-nosed man) - the big nose is a permanent feature of the man. Same goes for "La fille aux cheveux blonds" (The blond haired girl).

    du/de la/des are more complicated because they have two functions:
    1: as partitive articles (expressing 'some' in english)
    Je veux du pain = I want some bread
    These are NOT contractions.

    2: As contractions of the preposition de + definite article le/la/les (literally 'of the')
    Je parle du marché means "I am talking about the market" because in French 'talk about' = 'parler de'. The du here does not mean 'some', but is a contraction of de + le (of the).
    Here du etc. are actually contractions (of de + le/la/les) whereas partitive articles are not.

    Don't confuse the two uses of de/du/des!
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    You've hit the nail on the head once again, qwertyuiop1993!

    I'm sure there's a brilliant teaching career out there for you if you want it.
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    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    You've hit the nail on the head once again, qwertyuiop1993!

    I'm sure there's a brilliant teaching career out there for you if you want it.
    Thanks, that actually means a lot! I've recently been wondering about what I'm going to do after university and though there's a great pressure to go into law/finance etc. I've been feeling more and more that teaching in some shape or form is what I want to do (at secondary school level or perhaps undergraduate level if I find the willpower to do a doctorate) I did some tutoring while in sixth form and it was really rewarding when a student finally came to understand a concept and when I could see their enthusiasm about learning languages growing bit by bit.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
    Thanks, that actually means a lot! I've recently been wondering about what I'm going to do after university and though there's a great pressure to go into law/finance etc. I've been feeling more and more that teaching in some shape or form is what I want to do (at secondary school level or perhaps undergraduate level if I find the willpower to do a doctorate) I did some tutoring while in sixth form and it was really rewarding when a student finally came to understand a concept and when I could see their enthusiasm about learning languages growing bit by bit.
    I've been teaching for over 25 years now and love it for that very reason. There's not as much money in teaching but the satisfaction is huge when you see that you've made a difference in someone's learning - and sometimes in his/her life as your teaching may well inspire some to study French at university! It's a great job.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
    Le/la/les are definite articles - they mean 'the' in English and are used in mostly the same contexts. Which one you use depends on the gender of the noun and whether it is singular or plural. So la table (feminine) vs. le rocher (masculine) vs les tables (feminine plural) etc. You'll just have to learn the genders of nouns I'm afraid. Note that often English will drop the definite article where French keeps it - "I hate rain" = "Je déteste la pluie"

    au/à la/aux: au and aux are contractions of à + le and à + les respectively while there is no contraction with à la. These correspond broadly with 'to the' in English, hence "Je vais au marché" = I'm going to the market.
    It's not just about places though, you use this whenever a verb followed by à is then followed by a definite article (Je pense aux vacances = I'm thinking about the holidays")

    However, often 'au/à la/aux' are also used to link a noun with another noun that describes a long term physical property of the first noun: "un muffin au chocolat" - the very nature of a chocolate muffin is to have chocolate in it, so we use au. It's also why they say "L'homme au grand nez" (Big-nosed man) - the big nose is a permanent feature of the man. Same goes for "La fille aux cheveux blonds" (The blond haired girl).

    du/de la/des are more complicated because they have two functions:
    1: as partitive articles (expressing 'some' in english)
    Je veux du pain = I want some bread
    These are NOT contractions.

    2: As contractions of the preposition de + definite article le/la/les (literally 'of the')
    Je parle du marché means "I am talking about the market" because in French 'talk about' = 'parler de'. The du here does not mean 'some', but is a contraction of de + le (of the).
    Here du etc. are actually contractions (of de + le/la/les) whereas partitive articles are not.

    Don't confuse the two uses of de/du/des!
    Thank you so much for taking the time to help! I never thought abit it (the bold bit) in that way - so the way you've explained it will help me remember that rule more easily. Thank you!

    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    I've been teaching for over 25 years now and love it for that very reason. There's not as much money in teaching but the satisfaction is huge when you see that you've made a difference in someone's learning - and sometimes in his/her life as your teaching may well inspire some to study French at university! It's a great job.
    Thank you too with your help in my other post, both you 2 explain this stuff really well!

    And re teaching - the reason I picked my Uni modules is cos of the teachers that taught me them at school so go for teaching since you have a good way of explaining!
 
 
 
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