Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now

Markets - going there/talking about them (aller/faire)?? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    If someone says 'tu vas au marché?' are they asking 'do you go to the market?', hence au = to the?

    Also, if the response is 'je fais le marché de la semaine.' are they replying with 'I do the market in the week.'? If so, that doesn't make sense...so what is the correct translation?

    And I thought de le/les/la means 'about/with' something.

    And also that au/aux means 'to (the)' place.

    Help, s'il vous plait?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PhysicsGal)
    If someone says 'tu vas au marché?' are they asking 'do you go to the market?', hence au = to the?
    Yes. This could be translated as: Do you go to the market? or Are you going to the market?

    (Original post by PhysicsGal)
    Also, if the response is 'je fais le marché de la semaine.' are they replying with 'I do the market in the week.'? If so, that doesn't make sense...so what is the correct translation?
    Faire le marché means "to go shopping". So je fais le marché de la semaine means "I'm doing the weekly shopping."

    (Original post by PhysicsGal)
    And I thought de le/les/la means 'about/with' something
    It can mean that, but not necessarily. It depends on what comes before the de. For example, parler de quelque chose means to talk about something; so Nous parlons du film would mean "we're talking about the film". But with other expressions, the de might well mean something different - often "of", as in J'ai peur du chien, "I'm afraid of the dog" but sometimes nothing at all, as in J'ai besoin du dictionnaire, "I need the dictionary". You need to learn which verbs / expressions are followed by de and what they mean.

    You should also be aware of the contractions:
    de + le contracts to du
    de + la
    stays de la
    de + les
    contracts to des

    (Original post by PhysicsGal)
    And also that au/aux means 'to (the)' place
    Again, not necessarily. The same comments apply to verbs / expressions which are followed by à. For example, Je m'intéresse au français means "I'm interested in French"; and Je m'habitue aux voisins means "I'm getting used to the neighbours. Again, you need to learn which verbs / expressions take à and how they translate.

    And you should also know the contractions:

    à + le contracts to au
    à + la
    stays à la
    à + les
    contracts to aux
 
 
 
Poll
If you won £30,000, which of these would you spend it on?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.