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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) Watch

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    :bl: Similarities between collagen and haemoglobin ?
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    It must have loads of functions

    tbh I think it's one of those really detailed things that we don't really need to know about, they just tell us it exists I hate it when they do that but hey :cool:
    Ok cool . But do you know of past paper question I want to check my knowledge for protein synthesis?
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    (Original post by coco_madem0iselle)
    How I learnt it was DNA helicase (don't think we need to know that specifically) catalyses unzipping of DNA strands and breakage of hydrogen bonds.
    blah blah blah (haha)
    Then DNA polymerase catalyses linkage of hydrogen bonds and then the sugar phosphate backbone reforms with phosphodiester bonds.

    I think just mentioning DNA polymerase and the hydrogen bonds/sugar phosphate backbone reforming gets you a mark.
    Ah right okay I get it now, I'd never come across the DNA helicase before thanks
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    (Original post by t()m)
    Ok cool . But do you know of past paper question I want to check my knowledge for protein synthesis?
    Not specifically but...

    Outline the process of protein synthesis with regard to transcription and translation [8 ish]
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    Any predictions for the paper please?
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    Ah right okay I get it now, I'd never come across the DNA helicase before thanks
    No problem We don't need to know the enzyme name, it was just in this animation my teacher showed us to help us understand haha, I've never seen it mentioned on a mark scheme but I write it down anyway :P
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    What's the difference between interbreeding and cross breeding? Are they even different?

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    Does anybody have the mark scheme to the f212 january 2013 paper? please say, i need it.
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    (Original post by wndms)
    What's the difference between interbreeding and cross breeding? Are they even different?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Inbreeding refers to breeding between relatively closely related members of one species.

    crossbreeding refers to breeding between different breeds or something...like dogs I guess or in this exam cows or some kind of food source - so not the same species.

    If that makes any sense...

    EDIT - why the neg...do we have some veggies out there or something?
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    (Original post by SheriB)
    Does anybody have the mark scheme to the f212 january 2013 paper? please say, i need it.
    here u go: F212_MS_Jan13 (1).pdf
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    hi can someone please test me?
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    The functions of RNA came up in January 2013 here was the mark scheme.
    2 DNA unable to leave nucleus ;
    3 (m)RNA , copies / is a copy of , gene(s) / part of DNA ;
    4 (RNA) passes , out of nucleus / through nuclear pore /
    into cytoplasm ;
    5 to / at , ribosome / RER ;
    6 ribosome made of (r)RNA ;
    8 (RNA needed for) protein synthesis / formation of
    polypeptides / AW ;
    8 amino acids brought by (t)RNA ;
    QWC: 2 roles of RNA ;
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    What would be the significance of a LOW value for Simpson's Index of Diversity on a planned development?
    Like if it's high then the planned development wouldn't go ahead because it's high biodiversity and needs to be conserved etc...
    so if it's low would that mean that the plans would go ahead? Or would they not because the habitat is less stable and unlikely to adapt to change?

    Also what is the role of DNA polymerase?
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    (Original post by HeyMickey6)
    :bl: Similarities between collagen and haemoglobin ?
    Both have Quaternary structure (more than one polypeptide chain)
    Both have polypeptide chains
    Both made of amino acids
    Both have hydrogen bonds
    Both have peptide bonds
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    (Original post by Tania2k9)
    here u go: F212_MS_Jan13 (1).pdf
    Thanks so muck i honestly didnt think anyone would have answered me.

    how do micro organism cause food spoilage?
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    (Original post by xKaylax)
    What would be the significance of a LOW value for Simpson's Index of Diversity on a planned development?
    Like if it's high then the planned development wouldn't go ahead because it's high biodiversity and needs to be conserved etc...
    so if it's low would that mean that the plans would go ahead? Or would they not because the habitat is less stable and unlikely to adapt to change?

    Also what is the role of DNA polymerase?
    No, the opposite. A development would be built on an area of high Biodiversity as the area can withstand change
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    This means the environment is not stable and more species need to be introduced. Development has destructed species habitats therefor species no longer adapted enough to cope with the environmental condition. ( probably not right)
    2) DNA polymerase forms a covalent bond between the free nucleotides and its exposed bases in DNA replication.
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    Not specifically but...

    Outline the process of protein synthesis with regard to transcription and translation [8 ish]
    Transcription:

    Gene is exposed by breaking the hydrogen bonds between nitrogenous bases.

    mRNA forms complementary strand RNA.
    RNA Leaves nucleus through nuclear pore

    Transcription
    RNA arrives at ribose
    tRNA gather amino acid in triplet order of RNA.

    Forms peptide bond

    Sill stop codon and
    Protein released by ribosome
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    (Original post by SheriB)
    Thanks so muck i honestly didnt think anyone would have answered me.

    how do micro organism cause food spoilage?
    no problem,

    visible growth growing colonies on food
    using an external digestion process to release enzymes that break down the food molecules

    i need to know another one, do u know?
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    IN SITU
    advs: larger populations can be monitored, organisms are kept within their natural environment to which they are adapted. Animals can select their mates, the size of the gene pool is maintained (lower chance of inbreeding and disease susceptability), animals can still be tagged and tracked. nature parks can be set up which can protect animals from hunting, and these areas can also be used for scientific research and leisure activities such as hiking so there are benefits for everyone.

    disadvantages- it is harder to monitor the health of members of larger populations. Also, it is difficult to enforce hunting laws and many will continue to poach or log illegally. There is high competition in the wild and it might be difficult for some species to survive- and there is an increased mortality amongst the young. When you set up areas for nature reserves, this can often cause conflicts with the locals who can no longer use the land- for example for religious reasons (such as sacred sites for prayer). Tourists in the area can also feed protected animals which causes them harm.
    This is fantastic, Can you please do ex situ too ??

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