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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) Watch

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    Suggest two reasons why it is better to store seeds rather than to store whole
    plants
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    (Original post by kited4)
    but then if you think about it - people dont deliberately build on area's with high biodiversity like national parks etc
    That's what I mean, so would it be the opposite then for low biodiversity i.e. you would just build on it because there's nothing really special about it that's worth preserving?
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    (Original post by nevarsan)
    Suggest two reasons why it is better to store seeds rather than to store whole
    plants
    seeds take up less room so you can store more and they are easier/cheaper t transport.
    also less susceptible to disease and stay viable longer
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    Predictions anyone? :-)
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    (Original post by mastermdc)
    This is mostly correct. Just one minor mistake. You wrote A-T in base pairings. DNA replication involves mRNA, and so does not contain Thymine, it contains Uracil instead. So you should say A-U. Although, you'd probably get all the marks anyway
    I swear DNA replication has nothing to do with RNA
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    (Original post by nevarsan)
    Suggest two reasons why it is better to store seeds rather than to store whole
    plants
    Seeds don't take up as much space when you store them and can be stored in much larger numbers than plants, and remain viable for longer periods of time.
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    I swear DNA replication has nothing to do with RNA
    yes you're right RNA is in protein synthesis which was already touching on in jan 2013 so i doubt it'd come up again
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    I swear DNA replication has nothing to do with RNA
    Yes you're correct! DNA has nothing to do with RNA. RNA is involved in proteinsynthesis I think....
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    Can someone answer how microorganisms spoil food?
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    (Original post by Deziah)
    Predictions anyone? :-)
    Enzymes
    Proteins
    Malaria
    T and B cells
    Insecticide resistance
    Biological classification
    Conserving biodiversity
    (Maybe the reducing sugar test as the experiment)
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    (Original post by ivy96)
    Can someone answer how microorganisms spoil food?
    secrete enzymes onto the food, enzymes hydrolyse the food to break it up, the microorganism then takes in the nutrients and releases toxins onto the food.
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    (Original post by ivy96)
    Can someone answer how microorganisms spoil food?
    Don't think you really need to know the details. Mainly just that fungi secrete extracellular enzymes onto food, this is why they are saprotrophic.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Sam_1996)
    Enzymes
    Proteins
    Malaria
    T and B cells
    Insecticide resistance
    Biological classification
    Conserving biodiversity
    (Maybe the reducing sugar test as the experiment)
    Change enzymes to DNA and that wouldn't be too bad an exam haha.
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    do memory cells gradually leave the blood if there is no secondary infection? so is that why we need booster vaccinations e.g tetanus every 10 years
    or is that just because of mutations, so different antigens?
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    (Original post by ivy96)
    Can someone answer how microorganisms spoil food?
    -Bacteria secret enzymes which hydrolysis/break down molecules. So, proteins into amino acids, carbohydrates into glucose, triglycerides into fatty acids, etc, etc.
    -Bacteria also secrete waste products and toxins which change the appearance, taste, smell and texture of food.

    I learnt it as bacteria but I'm pretty sure you could just change it to microorganisms and it would be the same. :-)
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    - Collagen
    - Effect of pH on enzymes
    - Inhibitors
    - Adaptions (different types etc)
    - Darwin's observations
    - Why is biodiversity important
    - Effects of CO
    - Protein synthesis (long question)
    - Emulsion test
    - Cellulose maybe
    - Preventing food spoilage

    Just my ideas
    emulsion test is highly unlikely to come up it was in the January 2013 exam
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    (Original post by kited4)
    seeds take up less room so you can store more and they are easier/cheaper t transport.
    also less susceptible to disease and stay viable longer
    Yeah full marks (2)
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    Seeds don't take up as much space when you store them and can be stored in much larger numbers than plants, and remain viable for longer periods of time.
    Yeah full marks (2)
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    (Original post by king0617)
    The question is asking why its more similar to a pathogen the a parasite.

    Pathogens don't take nutrition from the host similar to viruses

    Parasites live on/in the host and take nutrients whilst harming the host
    Yeah but pathogens DO take nutrition from the host...it says in the textbook on page 160 under ''pathogens''
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    (Original post by kited4)
    do memory cells gradually leave the blood if there is no secondary infection? so is that why we need booster vaccinations e.g tetanus every 10 years
    or is that just because of mutations, so different antigens?
    I think so.
    Memory cells will eventually leave the blood so that's why you need a tetanus jab every ten years.
    I reckon you'd talk about mutations if you were talking about why everyone can't be given immunity to the influenza virus - seen as it mutates every year.
 
 
 
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