Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah, can someone help me with Higher Physics 1996 Q3 Paper 1?

    So confused.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Lets see it?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by String.)
    Lets see it?
    http://mrmackenzie.wikispaces.com/fi...96_HigherI.pdf

    Not sure if this will work but there.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EME Chris)
    Yeah, can someone help me with Higher Physics 1996 Q3 Paper 1?

    So confused.
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1364829175.777682.jpg
Views: 101
Size:  70.4 KB


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone 4s app.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jack--)
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1364829175.777682.jpg
Views: 101
Size:  70.4 KB


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone 4s app.
    Oh, i thought you could only use d=vt for the horizontal. I was trying to use an equation of motion to find out the time for the vertical.

    Thanks
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    http://mrmackenzie.wikispaces.com/fi...96_HigherI.pdf

    You can use d=vt because the question states that the vertical component velocity is constant.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Felix Felicis)
    You can't use that equation if the question is something like "Find the time taken for the ball to hit the ground".

    I suspect you need s = ut + \frac{1}{2} at^{2} but it'd be helpful if you posted the question :lol:
    Yeah sorry, i've posted the link a few times but it's not coming up. If you type in on Google "fizzics higher physics past papers 1992-2010" and then go to Higher Revision page it will be on there.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I should really pay more attention to the question.

    Thanks.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EME Chris)
    Yeah sorry, i've posted the link a few times but it's not coming up. If you type in on Google "fizzics higher physics past papers 1992-2010" and then go to Higher Revision page it will be on there.
    Ah, then you can use distance = speed x time or whatever letters you want to use - the vertical velocity is constant
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    all wondering what the question is it can be found here. http://mrmackenzie.wikispaces.com/fi...96_HigherI.pdf
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Just realised i have got Q4 wrong as well, if anyone knows the answer could you please help?
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EME Chris)
    Just realised i have got Q4 wrong as well, if anyone knows the answer could you please help?
    The magnitude of the frictional force is equal to the the magnitude of the horizontal component of the pulling force (force along dotted line). From this we can draw a triangle to represent the components of the pulling force, P:
    Name:  tsr.jpg
Views: 75
Size:  5.7 KB

    From this cos\theta=\frac{F}{P}
    so P=\frac{F}{cos\theta}
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Asklepios)
    The magnitude of the frictional force is equal to the the magnitude of the horizontal component of the pulling force (force along dotted line). From this we can draw a triangle to represent the components of the pulling force, P:
    Name:  tsr.jpg
Views: 75
Size:  5.7 KB

    From this cos\theta=\frac{F}{P}
    so P=\frac{F}{cos\theta}
    Appreciate the help.
 
 
 
Poll
Which web browser do you use?
Applying to university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.