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    I'm not really sure on what the best way is to revise for the sciences and maths. Tips please on how to revise and where? Also is it normal to revise better early in the morning at like 4am??



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    (Original post by Fayepenguin)
    I'm not really sure on what the best way is to revise for the sciences and maths. Tips please on how to revise and where? Also is it normal to revise better early in the morning at like 4am??



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    Hi, I do biology, chemistry, and maths at A2.

    Biology; there is so much theory. This is something which can't be gained by just doing past papers. You really have to know your stuff. Start with reading the text book, reading revision guides, and other useful material. Then for each topic, with the aid of your specification compile your own complete notes. This is really important - it's far, far better than just using somebody elses IMO. From there, revise from those notes. If anything is unclear, research more. The topics you find a bit "urgh" - I always try to do even more research on it, particularly online, till I find something cool and interesting about it. What I would do from then on is, go through my notes periodically. Initially this will take ages, but as you get the hang of it, you remember more of it, and the whole thing speeds up. When your feeling a bit more confident, start past papers. At the initial stage, I always put my notes to one side, complete the paper, and then look over my notes, and fill in any gaps I was unsure of. Then using the mark scheme, mark and correct my answers. Any problem areas, must be revised from top to bottom. Anyones I have wrong, I make a note of, and remember to go back and do those again at the end of the week. Rinse and repeat.

    Chemistry, for me is the complete opposite. You can know the text book stuff inside out, you can now your theory like the back of your hand, but it's all about applying it. And for this, you need crap loads of questions. So with this, I like to start doing it section by section. I start with a chapter in the textbook, go over the theory. Immediately find a bunch of questions on that particular chapter, and do loads of them, correcting them and learning from them as I go along, until I feel confident with it, and start getting them all correct. Rinse and repeat for the rest of chapters. Then begin past papers, and non-stop past papers as a whole. As before, correcting/marking, and making a note of any that you got wrong to come back to at the end of the week.

    Maths - lots of textbook exercises, and past papers till you feel you've used a forest worth of trees' paper.

    Hope that helped.
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Hi, I do biology, chemistry, and maths at A2.

    Biology; there is so much theory. This is something which can't be gained by just doing past papers. You really have to know your stuff. Start with reading the text book, reading revision guides, and other useful material. Then for each topic, with the aid of your specification compile your own complete notes. This is really important - it's far, far better than just using somebody elses IMO. From there, revise from those notes. If anything is unclear, research more. The topics you find a bit "urgh" - I always try to do even more research on it, particularly online, till I find something cool and interesting about it. What I would do from then on is, go through my notes periodically. Initially this will take ages, but as you get the hang of it, you remember more of it, and the whole thing speeds up. When your feeling a bit more confident, start past papers. At the initial stage, I always put my notes to one side, complete the paper, and then look over my notes, and fill in any gaps I was unsure of. Then using the mark scheme, mark and correct my answers. Any problem areas, must be revised from top to bottom. Anyones I have wrong, I make a note of, and remember to go back and do those again at the end of the week. Rinse and repeat.

    Chemistry, for me is the complete opposite. You can know the text book stuff inside out, you can now your theory like the back of your hand, but it's all about applying it. And for this, you need crap loads of questions. So with this, I like to start doing it section by section. I start with a chapter in the textbook, go over the theory. Immediately find a bunch of questions on that particular chapter, and do loads of them, correcting them and learning from them as I go along, until I feel confident with it, and start getting them all correct. Rinse and repeat for the rest of chapters. Then begin past papers, and non-stop past papers as a whole. As before, correcting/marking, and making a note of any that you got wrong to come back to at the end of the week.

    Maths - lots of textbook exercises, and past papers till you feel you've used a forest worth of trees' paper.

    Hope that helped.
    Could you help me actually by expanding on how you revise for maths. How do you know what to make notes on in terms of the concepts and examples? And do you know how like your supposed to go over things to remember them, surely you don't do all the same questions again so how do you recap?

    Thanks a lot. Is your revision going ok as your doing lots of hard stuff, well for me anyway.
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Hi, I do biology, chemistry, and maths at A2.

    Biology; there is so much theory. This is something which can't be gained by just doing past papers. You really have to know your stuff. Start with reading the text book, reading revision guides, and other useful material. Then for each topic, with the aid of your specification compile your own complete notes. This is really important - it's far, far better than just using somebody elses IMO. From there, revise from those notes. If anything is unclear, research more. The topics you find a bit "urgh" - I always try to do even more research on it, particularly online, till I find something cool and interesting about it. What I would do from then on is, go through my notes periodically. Initially this will take ages, but as you get the hang of it, you remember more of it, and the whole thing speeds up. When your feeling a bit more confident, start past papers. At the initial stage, I always put my notes to one side, complete the paper, and then look over my notes, and fill in any gaps I was unsure of. Then using the mark scheme, mark and correct my answers. Any problem areas, must be revised from top to bottom. Anyones I have wrong, I make a note of, and remember to go back and do those again at the end of the week. Rinse and repeat.

    Chemistry, for me is the complete opposite. You can know the text book stuff inside out, you can now your theory like the back of your hand, but it's all about applying it. And for this, you need crap loads of questions. So with this, I like to start doing it section by section. I start with a chapter in the textbook, go over the theory. Immediately find a bunch of questions on that particular chapter, and do loads of them, correcting them and learning from them as I go along, until I feel confident with it, and start getting them all correct. Rinse and repeat for the rest of chapters. Then begin past papers, and non-stop past papers as a whole. As before, correcting/marking, and making a note of any that you got wrong to come back to at the end of the week.

    Maths - lots of textbook exercises, and past papers till you feel you've used a forest worth of trees' paper.

    Hope that helped.
    Thank you!


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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    Could you help me actually by expanding on how you revise for maths. How do you know what to make notes on in terms of the concepts and examples? And do you know how like your supposed to go over things to remember them, surely you don't do all the same questions again so how do you recap?

    Thanks a lot. Is your revision going ok as your doing lots of hard stuff, well for me anyway.
    As I say, when I revise for maths, I literally just do lots of questions.

    I am very fortunate in that I have an excellent, EXCELLENT teacher who provides us with his own examples, for each bit of theory. Lots of different types, which we go over in class.

    To anyone who is less fortunate, I would say use textbooks / revision guides to provide those examples. You don't necessarily need to make notes in Maths, just go through a few examples of every type of question. Then attempt those questions. Marking and correcting as you go along. It can be really frustrating if you start getting things wrong and can't figure out why, which is why, when possible, I'd try to use questions where there are worked solutions. It's also why past papers are so good.

    So say I feel prepared with Maths, but I want to recap chapters 1-5.
    I pick out a couple of questions towards the end of an exercise for each chapter as they tend to be the harder ones / and do them.

    If I get them right, all's good. If I don't, look back at their examples, see if I can get it correct. If I still don't, I try a couple more - and see if I get those correct. If I do, I move on, maybe highlighting that particular question to my teacher at a point.

    EDIT: Oh and do every type of past paper question ever. I was on edexcel, but do the Solomon papers, the elmwood press, every type going. Any ones you get wrong, circle, and make sure you do them a couple more times before putting it away, so that you never forget how to do it. Often people don't want to "run out" of past papers too early on, and I completely get that. So do a variety, keep switching it up. I did some old spec (like pure mathematics etc), some AQA, some OCR questions my teacher felt relevant, just do loads.

    Previous to that, I used to be quite chill with maths, did a few questions here and there, did most of the textbook ones, few past papers. Got 87 in C1 and dandied along. When I got 68 in C2 I knew I had to step up. I started doing the method I've mentioned, retook, and got 98
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    As I say, when I revise for maths, I literally just do lots of questions.

    I am very fortunate in that I have an excellent, EXCELLENT teacher who provides us with his own examples, for each bit of theory. Lots of different types, which we go over in class.

    To anyone who is less fortunate, I would say use textbooks / revision guides to provide those examples. You don't necessarily need to make notes in Maths, just go through a few examples of every type of question. Then attempt those questions. Marking and correcting as you go along. It can be really frustrating if you start getting things wrong and can't figure out why, which is why, when possible, I'd try to use questions where there are worked solutions. It's also why past papers are so good.

    So say I feel prepared with Maths, but I want to recap chapters 1-5.
    I pick out a couple of questions towards the end of an exercise for each chapter as they tend to be the harder ones / and do them.

    If I get them right, all's good. If I don't, look back at their examples, see if I can get it correct. If I still don't, I try a couple more - and see if I get those correct. If I do, I move on, maybe highlighting that particular question to my teacher at a point.

    EDIT: Oh and do every type of past paper question ever. I was on edexcel, but do the Solomon papers, the elmwood press, every type going. Any ones you get wrong, circle, and make sure you do them a couple more times before putting it away, so that you never forget how to do it. Often people don't want to "run out" of past papers too early on, and I completely get that. So do a variety, keep switching it up. I did some old spec (like pure mathematics etc), some AQA, some OCR questions my teacher felt relevant, just do loads.

    Previous to that, I used to be quite chill with maths, did a few questions here and there, did most of the textbook ones, few past papers. Got 87 in C1 and dandied along. When I got 68 in C2 I knew I had to step up. I started doing the method I've mentioned, retook, and got 98
    That sounds life loads of effort but at least it paid off. I was thinking of just trying to remember the concepts, what do you think to that? Then whenever I see a problem I can just think on the spot.
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Hi, I do biology, chemistry, and maths at A2.

    Biology; there is so much theory. This is something which can't be gained by just doing past papers. You really have to know your stuff. Start with reading the text book, reading revision guides, and other useful material. Then for each topic, with the aid of your specification compile your own complete notes. This is really important - it's far, far better than just using somebody elses IMO. From there, revise from those notes. If anything is unclear, research more. The topics you find a bit "urgh" - I always try to do even more research on it, particularly online, till I find something cool and interesting about it. What I would do from then on is, go through my notes periodically. Initially this will take ages, but as you get the hang of it, you remember more of it, and the whole thing speeds up. When your feeling a bit more confident, start past papers. At the initial stage, I always put my notes to one side, complete the paper, and then look over my notes, and fill in any gaps I was unsure of. Then using the mark scheme, mark and correct my answers. Any problem areas, must be revised from top to bottom. Anyones I have wrong, I make a note of, and remember to go back and do those again at the end of the week. Rinse and repeat.

    Chemistry, for me is the complete opposite. You can know the text book stuff inside out, you can now your theory like the back of your hand, but it's all about applying it. And for this, you need crap loads of questions. So with this, I like to start doing it section by section. I start with a chapter in the textbook, go over the theory. Immediately find a bunch of questions on that particular chapter, and do loads of them, correcting them and learning from them as I go along, until I feel confident with it, and start getting them all correct. Rinse and repeat for the rest of chapters. Then begin past papers, and non-stop past papers as a whole. As before, correcting/marking, and making a note of any that you got wrong to come back to at the end of the week.

    Maths - lots of textbook exercises, and past papers till you feel you've used a forest worth of trees' paper.

    Hope that helped.
    Could not agree more for Biology or Maths
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    For maths definitely do all the past papers!
    I'd say do all of them from 2006 onwards and mark them. Then do the solomon papers and mark those. (you can find all the papers online)

    After a while you'll find that the same questions come up year after year, and eventually you'll find that the same questions come up in your final exam.

    It's also really satisfying to be able to see the improvement in your marks. Maybe you could record your marks on a spreadsheet so you can see which modules you need more revision for. You should be able to go up about 3 grades by just doing all the papers.

    edit: what's wrong with this advice?
 
 
 
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