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Grand National 'Original Extreme Sport' watch

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    I've ridden horses since I was 5 years old so I appreciate I may be a biased opinion on this subject.

    The Channel 4 advertisement claiming the Grand National is the original extreme sport infuriates me!

    Last year, two horses died on the course and the coverage failed to really acknowledge what had happened...

    I appreciate the tradition, heritage and revenue created by the event but is it really worth the loss of life to such beautiful animals? How would we feel if the jockeys had died? Why refuse to make the course safer?

    Im sorry if this is in the wrong forum, I'm just interested to hear people's views!

    Gx
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    They have taken steps to make the course safer after the deaths last year, or was that the year before when there was also 2 deaths?
    But I don't think the course itself is the problem, the problem is there are too many horses in the race and they get in each other's way.
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    I think to even it out they should put down any jockey with a broken leg after a fall.
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    (Original post by Sephiroth)
    They have taken steps to make the course safer after the deaths last year, or was that the year before when there was also 2 deaths?
    But I don't think the course itself is the problem, the problem is there are too many horses in the race and they get in each other's way.
    Yeah, the alterations to the course were 2 years ago. I agree there are too many horses as well. I just can't understand the lack of empathy some people show for the sake of traditionalism and greed.

    Makes me so cross!

    Gx
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    I hate the Grand National and horse racing. Any sport which is only fun to watch when gambling or drinking sucks. Don't get me started on horse deaths


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    Basically, reducing the field would make the race meaningless. Reducing the fences any more would also make it meaningless. That's why nobody does anything about it. There are only so many steps you can take before you start destroying the Grand National itself. You will never completely remove the chance of something bad from happening. Then again, there's also been times where horses have had to be put down after breaking their legs in flat racing.
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    Reducing the field would reduce the money made from the race as fewer losing bets would be placed and the spectacle would be lessened, it would no longer be the biggest annual race. Reducing the height and number of fences increases the speed over the course, making injuries more common.

    There is currently no way that I know of to make it safer than it is.
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    Reducing the field from 40 to 30 would be a good start. I understand why they would not want to do that, but if you watch the last 5 Years of Grand National races, you will see that most of the accidents with the horses actually involve a collision with another horse, not the actual fences themselves. The horses are too squashed at the start of the race. In my opinion, 40 is too many horses for the National and 30 would be more appropriate.
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    "Did you bet on the Grand National?"

    "No I'm not a moron."
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    I think most sports are dangerous, to be honest :/ there is the risk of injury whatever happens. And they have tried to make the Grand National a lot safer.

    Horses are built to run and jump, so it's not a case of they're being cruelly forced to do something that hurts them. It's inevitable though that injuries will take place no matter what they try and do to make it safer. It's very sad when horses fall and die though, so I'm in two minds about it.
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    (Original post by Jabberwox)
    I think most sports are dangerous, to be honest :/ there is the risk of injury whatever happens. And they have tried to make the Grand National a lot safer.

    Horses are built to run and jump, so it's not a case of they're being cruelly forced to do something that hurts them. It's inevitable though that injuries will take place no matter what they try and do to make it safer. It's very sad when horses fall and die though, so I'm in two minds about it.
    You are correct. Look at the race before with Mad Moose. If a horse does not want to run or jump, the horse will just refuse to do it. It is not the fences which are the problem with the Grand National, they have too many horses running.
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    (Original post by Gutterflower)
    I've ridden horses since I was 5 years old so I appreciate I may be a biased opinion on this subject.

    The Channel 4 advertisement claiming the Grand National is the original extreme sport infuriates me!

    Last year, two horses died on the course and the coverage failed to really acknowledge what had happened...

    I appreciate the tradition, heritage and revenue created by the event but is it really worth the loss of life to such beautiful animals? How would we feel if the jockeys had died? Why refuse to make the course safer?

    Im sorry if this is in the wrong forum, I'm just interested to hear people's views!

    Gx
    If you start making the jumps lower and the reducing the number of runners, then it will just end up being like any other race that knowbody cares about. The reason it is so popular is because there are so many horses, you get a lot of fallers and that makes it feel a bit crazy, like anything could happen and any horse could win.

    The race is so important. Its the only big event apart from cheltenham and is needed for the revenue and attension it brings to the sport.

    The horses exist for our entertainment. They are bred and spend their life racing for humans so it isn't like we are not already using the creatures. I don't think it is a big step to put the horses life in danger too, no worse than eating meat.

    If a horse dies in the race what does it miss out on? It misses being shoved back into a stable and being forced to run around with a bloke sat on its back everyday.
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    Tesco will be analysing the race closely

    How many horses do you think will die?



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    (Original post by Sternumator)
    If you start making the jumps lower and the reducing the number of runners, then it will just end up being like any other race that knowbody cares about. The reason it is so popular is because there are so many horses, you get a lot of fallers and that makes it feel a bit crazy, like anything could happen and any horse could win.

    The race is so important. Its the only big event apart from cheltenham and is needed for the revenue and attension it brings to the sport.

    The horses exist for our entertainment. They are bred and spend their life racing for humans so it isn't like we are not already using the creatures. I don't think it is a big step to put the horses life in danger too, no worse than eating meat.

    If a horse dies in the race what does it miss out on? It misses being shoved back into a stable and being forced to run around with a bloke sat on its back everyday.
    I'm going to have to vehemently disagree with this!

    Horses are not bred purely for our entertainment. Racehorses are bred to be powerful, beautiful animal-athletes who compete willingly, as with humans. Racehorses, on the whole, are treated with utmost respect, care and humility. Killing horses in a dangerous race is not like eating meat. Horses are not bred as food, they aren't (or at least shouldn't be) part of the food chain, in my opinion.

    Call me old fashioned, but I don't care about the attention the Grand National brings to horse-racing. From what I can gather, it's a day for posh people to waste money, Scouse ladies to get their tan and glad rags on and jockeys to feel famous for a day.

    Fortunately this year, no horses died; a huge relief and credit to Aintree for seemingly making it safer. I think less horses need to be involved in future though, as others have said.

    Oh and if a horse dies, it misses out on life....
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    (Original post by Gutterflower)
    I've ridden horses since I was 5 years old so I appreciate I may be a biased opinion on this subject.

    The Channel 4 advertisement claiming the Grand National is the original extreme sport infuriates me!

    Last year, two horses died on the course and the coverage failed to really acknowledge what had happened...

    I appreciate the tradition, heritage and revenue created by the event but is it really worth the loss of life to such beautiful animals? How would we feel if the jockeys had died? Why refuse to make the course safer?

    Im sorry if this is in the wrong forum, I'm just interested to hear people's views!

    Gx
    Ive ridden since before i can walk and met my family beautiful homebred mare when i was 3 days old.

    Length of time horse riding does not dictate how one feels about it.

    Personally I dont mind horse racing. If anything could be done to make the sport safer for the animals (i dont mind so much about the humans - they can make the conscious choice to participate or not) then it would be great.

    However horse racing is probably the equine sport that you could argue the majority of horses almost definatly enjoy it.

    Horses love to race each other, anyone who rides out regularly with other people with see this and the horses racing are no different, except going with more speed. There's also the fact that (as many horse riders probably know!) if your horse really really does not want to do something, it wont and this is true for the racers. If they seriously didnt want to do it they would fight against it.

    The only thing that really really bugs me about horse racing is the age at which the horse is raced. I dont think its fair to anything under 4 years old really. you wouldnt show jump, event or compete in serious dressage with a 2/3 year old, so why should racing be an exception.
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    (Original post by datpiff)
    I hate the Grand National and horse racing. Any sport which is only fun to watch when gambling or drinking sucks. Don't get me started on horse deaths


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    Oh no!

    Whatever will we do without you! :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
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    I think it should be banned. Why we can't satisfy ourselves with sports where animals don't die and where we don't beat them is beyond me.
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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    Ive ridden since before i can walk and met my family beautiful homebred mare when i was 3 days old.

    Length of time horse riding does not dictate how one feels about it.

    Personally I dont mind horse racing. If anything could be done to make the sport safer for the animals (i dont mind so much about the humans - they can make the conscious choice to participate or not) then it would be great.

    However horse racing is probably the equine sport that you could argue the majority of horses almost definatly enjoy it.

    Horses love to race each other, anyone who rides out regularly with other people with see this and the horses racing are no different, except going with more speed. There's also the fact that (as many horse riders probably know!) if your horse really really does not want to do something, it wont and this is true for the racers. If they seriously didnt want to do it they would fight against it.

    The only thing that really really bugs me about horse racing is the age at which the horse is raced. I dont think its fair to anything under 4 years old really. you wouldnt show jump, event or compete in serious dressage with a 2/3 year old, so why should racing be an exception.
    I didn't say my length of time riding affected my knowledge or authority on the matter, just that it may make me biased. I know people who have no affiliation with horses so are less affected by equine deaths or who care very little about it. Likewise, I have friends who have grown up with horses who feel strongly about it. That's what I based that statement on.

    Horses love to race each other yes, out in the open fields and along the beach or through the forest, not, in my opinion, on a track in front of thousands of human spectators nor on a track in which they face considerable risk to their life. Yes, a horse will refuse if it doesn't want to take part but it can't refuse to fall and break it's legs after a ridiculously high jump and it is the refusals facing the jumps that often causes injuries and deaths.

    Racehorses are bred to race from a young age so that doesn't affect me too much, it's the audacity of calling it an 'extreme sport' and significant risk of death for the horses that riles me concerning the Grand National. As I said, there we no fatalities this year, so credit to Aintree, the horses and jockeys for a safe run.
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    (Original post by Gutterflower)
    I didn't say my length of time riding affected my knowledge or authority on the matter, just that it may make me biased. I know people who have no affiliation with horses so are less affected by equine deaths or who care very little about it. Likewise, I have friends who have grown up with horses who feel strongly about it. That's what I based that statement on.

    Horses love to race each other yes, out in the open fields and along the beach or through the forest, not, in my opinion, on a track in front of thousands of human spectators nor on a track in which they face considerable risk to their life. Yes, a horse will refuse if it doesn't want to take part but it can't refuse to fall and break it's legs after a ridiculously high jump and it is the refusals facing the jumps that often causes injuries and deaths.

    Racehorses are bred to race from a young age so that doesn't affect me too much, it's the audacity of calling it an 'extreme sport' and significant risk of death for the horses that riles me concerning the Grand National. As I said, there we no fatalities this year, so credit to Aintree, the horses and jockeys for a safe run.
    The biggest fence is 5ft2 in the national, a height which many many horses and even ponies jump quite happily.
    The length of the average thoroughbred's gallop stride reaches about 20 feet so the lengths arent the issue either.

    it is the amount of horses which take part and horses youth, lack of full development and inexperience which cause the problems more than the fences. it is rare for a horse to fall over a fence anywhere except racing and maybe hunting - both of these have the same factor, too many horses getting in each others way, and for hunting crap ground.

    How exactly do the horses see the racetrack as different to a stretch of field? If you have ever tried to retrain a racehorse, they are pretty much eager to run whenever they touch anything grassy. Horses dont just decide 'oh im on a racetrack, i dont like racing my friends any more'.
    Not how they work. As much as i hate to say it they are not massively intelligent so dont think like that. They dont think 'This is a course i might die on'. Horses rarely think ahead like that.
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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    The biggest fence is 5ft2 in the national, a height which many many horses and even ponies jump quite happily.
    The length of the average thoroughbred's gallop stride reaches about 20 feet so the lengths arent the issue either.

    it is the amount of horses which take part and horses youth, lack of full development and inexperience which cause the problems more than the fences. it is rare for a horse to fall over a fence anywhere except racing and maybe hunting - both of these have the same factor, too many horses getting in each others way, and for hunting crap ground.

    How exactly do the horses see the racetrack as different to a stretch of field? If you have ever tried to retrain a racehorse, they are pretty much eager to run whenever they touch anything grassy. Horses dont just decide 'oh im on a racetrack, i dont like racing my friends any more'.
    Not how they work. As much as i hate to say it they are not massively intelligent so dont think like that. They dont think 'This is a course i might die on'. Horses rarely think ahead like that.
    Yes, 'The Chair' is 5"2 but it has a 6" ditch on the take off side that's 3" deep. That's not a usual jump for a horse, surely? It is the amount of horses but also the design of the field and jumps.

    I didn't say they saw it differently, just that I'd prefer to see them racing in natural, safer environments than the one provided by the Grand National. I never said the horses understood or made decisions, that's precisely my point, they can't! So why subject them to a crowded, dangerous race?

    The long and the short of it is, prior to this year, there were too many equine fatalities and I despise the sentiment that the Grand National is an 'Extreme Sport'.
 
 
 
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