Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I was talking to my friends at uni about Ireland and none of them seemed to really have a clue what had ever happened. So my question is this:

    Do people, outside of the island of Ireland, have any idea of what has actually gone on in Ireland in the past two centuries?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I studied the events that led to the partition in the early 1920s which is part of the A level History syllabus and I have looked at devolution which is in the politics syllabus, looked at it as part of my Uni module.

    People do have an idea but it is the level of understanding differs
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Only from the 1920s onwards. Know something about the Battle of the Boyne, where it all starts from (I think).
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I think most British people know what has happened to some extent, but that extent varies significantly.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by meenu89)
    Only from the 1920s onwards. Know something about the Battle of the Boyne, where it all starts from.
    Do people know, for instance, that there are bombs every so often? And the possibility of the troubles starting again is very high? Or do people think it is over?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ANB1993)
    Do people know, for instance, that there are bombs every so often? And the possibility of the troubles starting again is very high? Or do people think it is over?
    I know about the other Republicans who are really unhappy. Something about the first Catholic from the PS of NI to be killed. I didn't know that the troubles may start again.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ANB1993)
    I was talking to my friends at uni about Ireland and none of them seemed to really have a clue what had ever happened. So my question is this:

    Do people, outside of the island of Ireland, have any idea of what has actually gone on in Ireland in the past two centuries?
    Someone told me that the Irish wanted some potatoes from the English because there potatoes were eaten by worms and the English were like "No!" and then they rebelled and demanded freedom .
    I've never taken History, so my knowledge is based on word of mouth
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    From my own experiences, people tend to know a lot about The Troubles in NI and the threat of Irish terrorism but on general ROI and Irish history it's pretty scant. Seems quite ironic that through the history curriculum we spent so much time looking at places like Germany and America but not the country right next door to us with which we have a direct historical connection.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    From what I know, the curriculum in England leaves out a lot of the history in Ireland. I went to university in Scotland and very few of the people I met at university knew anything about the history of Ireland (mostly a mix of English and Scottish).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by meenu89)
    I know about the other Republicans who are really unhappy. Something about the first Catholic from the PS of NI to be killed. I didn't know that the troubles may start again.
    So people know about the Republicans stirring trouble? But it seems to be overlooked the trouble stirred by unionists? It is probably 50% Republicans causing and 50% unionists causing trouble against Nationalists, riling them up.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by malteser87)
    From what I know, the curriculum in England leaves out a lot of the history in Ireland. I went to university in Scotland and very few of the people I met at university knew anything about the history of Ireland (mostly a mix of English and Scottish).
    (Original post by Eloquai)
    From my own experiences, people tend to know a lot about The Troubles in NI and the threat of Irish terrorism but on general ROI and Irish history it's pretty scant. Seems quite ironic that through the history curriculum we spent so much time looking at places like Germany and America but not the country right next door to us with which we have a direct historical connection.
    Even in mainstream current news, they don't say much about Ireland (ROI). It's quite strange.

    I know more about France and what's currently happening in France (e.g. politics, society) than I do about Ireland (ROI).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HumanSupremacist)
    Even in mainstream current news, they don't say much about Ireland (ROI). It's quite strange.

    I know more about France and what's currently happening in France (e.g. politics, society) than I do about Ireland (ROI).
    Yeah I've noticed, and in the English school I taught in the students were very uneducated about Ireland and had loads of misconceptions.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    So it seems that what I have seen is rather accurate! Many are unaware of the current if not also the past situation in Ireland!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I know the history of Ireland is very crazy, having been invaded by all sorts of people such as Vikings, Celts and Normans.

    What makes me laugh is that I've heard that from an Irish nationalist view, they think that it was a utopian and united land whereas the other view is that it was populated by savages. I think it's fair to say that both views are most likely *******s.

    Something I've been trying to find is whether Ireland is supposed to have been united before being British, or did it become known as a constituent country as opposed to having multiple constituent countries on the island like Great Britain does.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    I know the history of Ireland is very crazy, having been invaded by all sorts of people such as Vikings, Celts and Normans.

    What makes me laugh is that I've heard that from an Irish nationalist view, they think that it was a utopian and united land whereas the other view is that it was populated by savages. I think it's fair to say that both views are most likely *******s.

    Something I've been trying to find is whether Ireland is supposed to have been united before being British, or did it become known as a constituent country as opposed to having multiple constituent countries on the island like Great Britain does.
    It was divided into kingdoms of Ulster, Munster, Leinster and Connaught. It was briefly united before it was invaded.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ANB1993)
    I was talking to my friends at uni about Ireland and none of them seemed to really have a clue what had ever happened. So my question is this:

    Do people, outside of the island of Ireland, have any idea of what has actually gone on in Ireland in the past two centuries?
    My concern is that those involved in politics from outside Ireland who try to impose a view on others or who make empty political statements about the conflict in Ireland (North or South) actually don't know what they are talking about.

    'The Ireland situation' as you called it is on-going. I watched BBC Newsline tonight (BBC NI) and could not believe the number of headlines dedicated towards sectarian events - Dissident republicans attacking police at Easter Rising commemorations, petrol bombs, Orange Order marching through nationalist areas etc - and this is supposed to be NI in a peaceful stage.

    Our politicians who take seats in the power sharing Executive are supposed to represent everyone and should be everyone's First Minister, Deputy First Minister, Health Minister, Culture Minister etc etc, but you wouldn't believe the stupid, sectarian garbage that spews from some of their mouths sometimes - it's a depressing state of affairs.

    To answer your question about what happened:

    In my view, Ireland should have remained united as one country, either as an independent Republic or as a constituent nation within the UK. I completely understand why people fought for Irish independence, because they were undoubtedly given second class citizenship in their own country, but the conflict that followed partition both through the Irish Civil War and later the Troubles was not worth it. The lasting legacy of the Troubles is still evident in our society in cities like Belfast, Derry etc.

    Partition was supposed to be a temporary fix for Republicans and nationalists who wanted independence, but we still don't have it. The conflict and division meanwhile, although it is much much less, has simply been concentrated and confined to the North. So has partition worked for anyone?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ANB1993)
    Do people know, for instance, that there are bombs every so often? And the possibility of the troubles starting again is very high? Or do people think it is over?
    Well, most people think it is over because it is largely over.

    The troubles won't happen again like before.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    It is a strange one. I suppose it's considered too contentious to teach at school.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Well, most people think it is over because it is largely over.

    The troubles won't happen again like before.
    The Troubles started (partly) because an Irish tricolour was forcefully removed from a political office in West Belfast...ring any bells? Union Flag removed from City Hall?

    Our politicians are the only people who benefit from the current situation. As long as people are always voting green or orange, they know they'll always have a job - all they have to do is keep the electorate in order - e.g. unionist politicians tell the electorate their civil rights (over a flag) are under siege or that there's going to be a United Ireland if they don't vote for unionist parties; nationalists and republicans occasionally remind their electorate that if they don't vote for them, the Orange Order will be allowed to march anywhere they want and the British army will return to the streets - it's all scaremongering and people are now entrenched in their politics of fear.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cmca1)
    My concern is that those involved in politics from outside Ireland who try to impose a view on others or who make empty political statements about the conflict in Ireland (North or South) actually don't know what they are talking about.

    'The Ireland situation' as you called it is on-going. I watched BBC Newsline tonight (BBC NI) and could not believe the number of headlines dedicated towards sectarian events - Dissident republicans attacking police at Easter Rising commemorations, petrol bombs, Orange Order marching through nationalist areas etc - and this is supposed to be NI in a peaceful stage.

    Our politicians who take seats in the power sharing Executive are supposed to represent everyone and should be everyone's First Minister, Deputy First Minister, Health Minister, Culture Minister etc etc, but you wouldn't believe the stupid, sectarian garbage that spews from some of their mouths sometimes - it's a depressing state of affairs.

    To answer your question about what happened:

    In my view, Ireland should have remained united as one country, either as an independent Republic or as a constituent nation within the UK. I completely understand why people fought for Irish independence, because they were undoubtedly given second class citizenship in their own country, but the conflict that followed partition both through the Irish Civil War and later the Troubles was not worth it. The lasting legacy of the Troubles is still evident in our society in cities like Belfast, Derry etc.

    Partition was supposed to be a temporary fix for Republicans and nationalists who wanted independence, but we still don't have it. The conflict and division meanwhile, although it is much much less, has simply been concentrated and confined to the North. So has it worked?
    To answer your question, it is yes and no. The fact of the matter is, that when the majority votes, Ireland will be united and currently the percentage of Protestants to Catholics in Ireland in 52-48. When this vote goes through, the delay of partition and the relatively "peaceful" years will be forgotten with an outburst of violence

    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Well, most people think it is over because it is largely over.

    The troubles won't happen again like before.
    And on what grounds do you come to that conclusion? Having lived through schools in Ireland and having just left for university, I can promise you that within the next 20 years there will be an outbreak of the troubles. However, it may be the unionists fighting guerrilla warfare as a United Ireland is on the rising.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.