Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    So... I'm thinking of going out to live in accommodation in uni... Which is only for 1 year before you have to get out of there.

    1. So I would then need to live in a flat, which would leave me no choice but to really get a part time job to make my life easier financially right?
    I would have to pay for my daily usage of buying food etc.. and I would then need to pay for the flat and the bills (?)

    2. Am I able to use my yearly grant to pay for the living costs of the flat I'd be living in?

    3. Would you recommend me to get a part time job through during the first year?

    4. What are some recommended part time jobs to take, which have an average pay?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I don't know how it all works in the UK regarding grants. But time wise- I work 15-25 hours a week. My class schedule is 12 hours per week plus at least 32 hours per week self study. On top of this I still have time to run a committee and run 3 or 4 times a week. It gets tiring but if you really need to work and you really want to succeed then you can. I work as an assistant chef but I help people find part-time jobs in Holland, we usually get them into waitressing, bar staff, potwashing or call center jobs. Perhaps you can find something related to your study? When I'm back in the UK during the summer and winter holidays, I work as a care assistant, which ties in rather nicely because I'm studying biology and want to do a masters in Immunology. I guess wage wise you can expect minimum wage, which is slightly over 6 pounds per hour for under 21s I think
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Your grant and loan money is for you to spend however you wish. The tuition money will go direct to the university and you're given a wad of cash to live on. Typically it will go towards accommodation and food (and later, bills), but the rest is for you to spend. So yeah, you can spend the grant on a better house - Just double check the requirements for the grant as I think they evaluate it each year, so just make sure you can afford where you're living.

    Get a job if you want, but most people don't. The loan usually covers everything. Most will work in bars, restaurants or coffee shops. The supermarkets can be quite good for students too, but it would be best to really check your timetable before applying. Depending on your course, you may or may not have enough free time to work. Depending on your age, experience and the location, you could earn £5-6 an hour and work 8-16 hours a week. The supermarkets are often good for pay too.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    You'll want a job close by, perhaps look at university campus jobs or something.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    You have to pay rent in halls in first year too and this will be higher to account for you not paying any bills, for me second year is actually going to work out cheaper as I'm going from just over £100pw including bills in halls to just under £70pw without in a shared house.

    If you want or need extra money then a part-time job is a good idea, pretty much any business can be somewhere to work. Most places will be minimum wage and the odd place that pays more will likely be in high demand. From the top of my head John Lewis and Waitrose supposedly pay the best from the chain stores (based on what I've heard, haven't actually worked there myself and don't know exact pay).

    As others have said your grant can go on anything. Along with your maintenance loan it goes into your bank account and it's then your money to spend as you wish. Most students use it to pay rent and then any extra goes on food, bills, socialising or even into savings if you have enough left over.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by StacFace)
    You have to pay rent in halls in first year too and this will be higher to account for you not paying any bills, for me second year is actually going to work out cheaper as I'm going from just over £100pw including bills in halls to just under £70pw without in a shared house.

    If you want or need extra money then a part-time job is a good idea, pretty much any business can be somewhere to work. Most places will be minimum wage and the odd place that pays more will likely be in high demand. From the top of my head John Lewis and Waitrose supposedly pay the best from the chain stores (based on what I've heard, haven't actually worked there myself and don't know exact pay).

    As others have said your grant can go on anything. Along with your maintenance loan it goes into your bank account and it's then your money to spend as you wish. Most students use it to pay rent and then any extra goes on food, bills, socialising or even into savings if you have enough left over.
    When your in halls you don't pay for rent over the summer and sometimes you don't have to pay for it over easter. In halls you also get perks, such as bus travel or gym membership included. So it doesn't work out that much cheaper.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by poiuy)
    When your in halls you don't pay for rent over the summer and sometimes you don't have to pay for it over easter. In halls you also get perks, such as bus travel or gym membership included. So it doesn't work out that much cheaper.
    Fair enough on paying over the summer, forgot about that. Bus travel is definitely something to take into consideration if you live far out enough to use it and it's offered, didn't know some unis included gym membership with their halls though.

    Just checked for my own situation and this year I'm paying £4579.50 for a room in halls with just bills and no other perks like bus travel to take into account. Next year I'll be paying £3588 over the year for a room in a shared house without bills. Dividing the yearly amounts over 52 weeks for a fair comparison the shared house will work out just under £20 cheaper per week and from what we've been told by parents, students in higher years, people on here etc our bills shouldn't be that high each.

    I know it's not massively cheaper but was just pointing it out as from the wording it seemed OP thought they'd be able to afford first year with their loan and grant but then have to get a job to afford second year, as if they thought halls were subsidised and when they got to 2nd year they'd be paying much higher rent rates or the same rent but with massive bills to pay. Basically I'm saying if they can support themselves living in halls they should be able to do it in a shared house in later years too (assuming they get the same level of finance each year).
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.