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    A bullet hits a target 301.5m away. What maximum height above the muzzle did the bullet reach if it was shot at an angle of 25.0 degrees to the ground?

    i'm totally stumped. Can't figure out what to do. Help?
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    (Original post by BooksAndCoffee)
    A bullet hits a target 301.5m away. What maximum height above the muzzle did the bullet reach if it was shot at an angle of 25.0 degrees to the ground?

    i'm totally stumped. Can't figure out what to do. Help?
    Welcome to TSR

    You need to post the whole question if you want an answer.
    There is missing information so it isn't possible to solve this as it stands.
    eg the initial speed of the bullet.
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    (Original post by BooksAndCoffee)
    A bullet hits a target 301.5m away. What maximum height above the muzzle did the bullet reach if it was shot at an angle of 25.0 degrees to the ground?

    i'm totally stumped. Can't figure out what to do. Help?
    See
    http://www.topendsports.com/biomecha...mages/path.gif

    Therefore the maximum height above the muzzle occurs when the bullet has travelled horizontally 150.75m. Isn't there any extra information they gave you e.g. total time of flight? I feel there is a lack of information.
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    I think it's doable.

    All parabolic trajectories with the same launch angle are similar... The ratio of range to max height is constant. You could solve range and height for a dummy muzzle velocity then scale the range.

    If you can do that, it should also be possible to come up with a formula for muzzle velocity in terms of launch angle, g and range, which would allow you to solve by the usual method.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    I think it's doable.

    All parabolic trajectories with the same launch angle are similar... The ratio of range to max height is constant. You could solve range and height for a dummy muzzle velocity then scale the range.

    If you can do that, it should also be possible to come up with a formula for muzzle velocity in terms of launch angle, g and range, which would allow you to solve by the usual method.
    Are you assuming the height of the target above the ground = height of muzzle? Then it's doable. It's a reasonable assumption. But this isn't stated. You could fire a projectile at 25 degs elevation and hit a wall 301.5m away at many different heights depending on the muzzle velocity.
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    (Original post by Stonebridge)
    Are you assuming the height of the target above the ground = height of muzzle? Then it's doable. It's a reasonable assumption. But this isn't stated. You could fire a projectile at 25 degs elevation and hit a wall 301.5m away at many different heights depending on the muzzle velocity.
    yeah I did assume that.
 
 
 
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