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If you get As at GCSE what grade would you be expected at A level? watch

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    I was just wondering what A level grade you would be expected if you had Certain GCSEs like if you got an A in History, would you be likely to get an A at A level.
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    I was always told your expected to get 2 grades below what you got at gcse
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    Even if you got all A*s at GCSE, doesn't mean you will get good grades in A-Levels. I learned the hard way! So forget expected grades, as they are pointless. Basically you up your effort in revision and you'll get better grades.
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    There's not a particular trend for what you get at GCSE and A level, I've seen people get 10A*'s at GCSE then do average at A level. Perhaps because they think they can wing it, or perhaps for another reason. Likewise I know a lot of people who did average at GCSE then absolutely smash A level.

    What you put in = what you get out. And for those who didn't do as well as they wanted at GCSE, they tend to put more in because they strive to be better.
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    I'll give an honest answer and say it's different for everybody. From what I've noticed, some people who got A's at GCSE and took History thought it would be a stride in the park so did the same amount of revision (sidenote: don't do this), thus got C/D grades. Then again, some people who got A's at GCSE put the effort in and came out with A's, so it's dependent on the person.

    From my experience (as someone with A grades at GCSE), I got ABB at AS level, and aiming for AAB at A level, so it is achievable. Many people even continue getting A's throughout. Likewise, some people took subjects that they didn't like as they thought it'd make them look smart and would be as easy as the others (Maths, Physics, Chemistry), and ended up resitting the year (though this was also down to lack of revision). As long as you pay attention in class, keep up with notes, know what's expected of you, an A is achievable
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    ''A'' probably but it depends on how hard you work
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    GCSE really doesn't reflect A level ability. Your work ethic is what will really help at college. I got A*AAAABBBCC at GCSE and at A level i'm on AABB.

    My friend got straight A's at GCSE and is scraping C's at A level.

    e.g. she got an A at gcse in maths, got a C in AS level and dropped it. I got a low B at gcse, and i'm on an A for A level (doing it in A2 aswell and coping fine). It really is just on how hard you work! Plus some people who do well at GCSE without revising become relaxed, and think they know everything so they take a step back at A level... and trust me, you really can't wing it at A level. You have to study HARD. But it's possible!
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    Your GCSE grades really 3/10th of predicting your capability.
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    (Original post by Captain Britain)
    I was just wondering what A level grade you would be expected if you had Certain GCSEs like if you got an A in History, would you be likely to get an A at A level.
    Obviously if you get an A in History at GCSE, you're likely to have an aptitude for history, and you'll find it easier to reach that A grade at A level, maybe.
    Nothing is guaranteed. A level is a whole new world to GCSEs. You're introduced to all this new information, new ways of thinking, new ways of criticising. My A Levels are Chemistry, Maths, Further Maths and Physics, so I can't speak for the arts subjects, but i'll use Chemistry as an example.
    In GCSE Chemistry, you might be familiarised with the idea of 'atoms in shells'. In your first week of AS chemistry, you learn that that's basically all wrong.I won't go into the detail of what they do instead, but you have to be able to learn really quite swiftly.
    Bear in mind that there are subjects available at A level that are not offered at GCSE, such as Computing, Economics and Law (at my school, anyway). Because there are a heck of a lot of people that pick these subjects up at A level, they have to give them a level playing ground, which means that everyone in every subject has to really be starting from scratch.
    In Physics, we're introduced to quantum mechanics, something only covered in the AQA specification at GCSE.

    While I can't give a whole lot of information on the arts, as far as I know the situation is this: You have to be critical, and you have to argue, a lot. At GCSE, you will recall a lot of facts. While this is also true at A level, you have to be able to apply all of those facts in comparison and contrast with each other, and use a lot of independent knowledge to show that you really know what you're talking about. I can't give any examples from history, but that's basically the jist.

    So in short, No. An A at GCSE does not mean an A at A level- but you have a good shot.
    It does also work the other way, which is to say; If you get a C at GCSE, you want to prove that you can get an A at A level, so you work your socks off and get one. At the same time, if you 100% your GCSE, you might feel that the A level is going to be a breeze, and consequently flop, due to an absence of revision.
    The best way to do it is get an A/A* at GCSE, then continue your hard work at A level, and get an A/A* there.

    NB:
    Revision tactics you employ at GCSE will not work at A level. Develop new strategies.
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    It depends on the amount of work you do...I got told once by a teacher that an A* at GCSE = E at A level...but yeah a levels are a big step up from gcse
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    As a teacher of maths I would say, from experience, there are some patterns.
    It does though come down to attitude for a large number. A good strong base of knowledge and understanding is key BUT many pupils blossom in A Level who didnt in GCSE and many who do well at GCSE peak there and can't take it on.

    Maths requires, as with many subjects, a massive amount of independent learning at A Level and the gap between the intensity of GCSE and A Level is wide relative to some subjects.

    There is some data on how pupils get on below on my site. It is a little old and there are lot's of factors that influence success:

    http://www.m4ths.com/index.php?p=1_12

    My findings, which are purely anecdotal, have found the following trends:

    C grade at GCSE maths = generally non completion of AS
    B grade at GCSE maths = D/E or non completion
    A grade at GCSE maths = whole range of A Level results including A*-U
    A* grade at GCSE maths = as above

    I think the vast majority of pupils I have taught who have done well from B grades at GCSE are EAL students and those who didnt apply themselves at GCSE.

    I would say the ball is in your court as a student and strong study skills, good teaching, motivation and support will see you to good A Level results.
    That is all purely from experience rather than gospel and should be treated accordingly.
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    I was always told your expected to get 2 grades below what you got at gcse
    No, you start at two grades below your GCSE result (supposedly). It doesn't really matter. Obviously, if you get an F in Chem, don't do it at A level. et cetera, et cetera.
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    I got a C in GCSE history and an A* in A level ancient history. I think we can extract some generally applicable rule from that, right?
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    It depends completely on the subject and the amount of effort you put in. At a-level I went up in art and down in geography biology and chemistry. I think I peaked in chemistry GCSE, I had to put a LOT of effort in even then, that probably should have been my first sign, but I got an A* so thought I could handle a-level, but got a C at AS then dropped it. But anyway don't go on your premise, it is almost certainly wrong. It is dependent on a lot of things, and GCSE grades can be irrelevant a lot of the time when it comes to a-levels.
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    Depends on the work ethic. If you're an A in History GCSE and do sh*t all at A-Level revision wise you'll fail and get a U. If you work hard and continue the way you're going, and revise everything you learn at A-Level, you'll succeed. GCSE grades can't predict anything when it comes to A-Levels.

    If it helps, this is Level 2 (GCSE) grades in comparison to Level 3 (AS/A2)

    GCSE Grades ~ AS/A2 Equivalent
    A* ~ C
    A ~ D
    B ~ E
    C ~ F/G
    D, E, F, G, U ~ U

    Edit: Thanks for the negs even though everything I said was correct.
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    (Original post by chapmouse)
    Obviously if you get an A in History at GCSE, you're likely to have an aptitude for history, and you'll find it easier to reach that A grade at A level, maybe.
    Nothing is guaranteed. A level is a whole new world to GCSEs. You're introduced to all this new information, new ways of thinking, new ways of criticising. My A Levels are Chemistry, Maths, Further Maths and Physics, so I can't speak for the arts subjects, but i'll use Chemistry as an example.
    In GCSE Chemistry, you might be familiarised with the idea of 'atoms in shells'. In your first week of AS chemistry, you learn that that's basically all wrong.I won't go into the detail of what they do instead, but you have to be able to learn really quite swiftly.
    Bear in mind that there are subjects available at A level that are not offered at GCSE, such as Computing, Economics and Law (at my school, anyway). Because there are a heck of a lot of people that pick these subjects up at A level, they have to give them a level playing ground, which means that everyone in every subject has to really be starting from scratch.
    In Physics, we're introduced to quantum mechanics, something only covered in the AQA specification at GCSE.

    While I can't give a whole lot of information on the arts, as far as I know the situation is this: You have to be critical, and you have to argue, a lot. At GCSE, you will recall a lot of facts. While this is also true at A level, you have to be able to apply all of those facts in comparison and contrast with each other, and use a lot of independent knowledge to show that you really know what you're talking about. I can't give any examples from history, but that's basically the jist.

    So in short, No. An A at GCSE does not mean an A at A level- but you have a good shot.
    It does also work the other way, which is to say; If you get a C at GCSE, you want to prove that you can get an A at A level, so you work your socks off and get one. At the same time, if you 100% your GCSE, you might feel that the A level is going to be a breeze, and consequently flop, due to an absence of revision.
    The best way to do it is get an A/A* at GCSE, then continue your hard work at A level, and get an A/A* there.

    NB:
    Revision tactics you employ at GCSE will not work at A level. Develop new strategies.
    Wow, this is a great eye opener as I don't really know that much about A-levels.
 
 
 
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