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    Probably a silly question, but is there a correlation between yield and equilibrium? So if I changed the equilibrium to be favourable to the products side, would the yield of the product also increase?
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    Well the short answer to your question is yes.
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    can you expand on your question it's a little unclear
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    (Original post by Zenomorph)
    can you expand on your question it's a little unclear
    Firstly, the position of the equilibrium is determined by the gibbs free energy change of the process. What is very important is that the gibbs free energy change of the process DOES NOT affect the rate of reaction, contrary to what may appear logical!
    The rate is determined by the height of the energy barrier the molecule must overcome to reach the products.

    There are 2 important factors when considering the yield.... (absolute not percentage yield)

    1st, the position of the equilibrium. If the equilibrium lies well to the products then you can extract more of the product giving a higher yield, however it may only be produced very slowly. In this circumstance you get a high % yield but a poor absolute yield.
    2nd, rate of reaction. If the rate of reaction is fast, you produce a lot of your product giving a good absolute yield quickly.
    In industrial processes, there is a balance between getting a good % yield and getting a good absolute yield. Ultimately the absolute yield is most important as that is what you sell, but a low % yield is uneconomical.
    For an example look up the Haber process, the most over studied thing ever in GCSE and A-Level chem :P
 
 
 
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