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    Hello I have 3 pairs of jeans... teal, khaki and berry.. If I were to dye them with black fabric dye, would they turn darker or just get completely ruined? Thanks
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    I have a wine-coloured dress that I wanted to dye, but in the end I didn't, simply because I'm scared of ruining it. I did do my research, however. If you want to home-dye, use a good dye such as Dylon. Also read all the tips on their website. If you do dye them yourself, I recommend dying your least favourite pair first, just in case. Also, ALWAYS READ THE INSTRUCTIONS ON THE PACKET.
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    (Original post by rali)
    I have a wine-coloured dress that I wanted to dye, but in the end I didn't, simply because I'm scared of ruining it. I did do my research, however. If you want to home-dye, use a good dye such as Dylon. Also read all the tips on their website. If you do dye them yourself, I recommend dying your least favourite pair first, just in case. Also, ALWAYS READ THE INSTRUCTIONS ON THE PACKET.
    Thanks! I'll check out their website now
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    (Original post by Miss Purple)
    Hello I have 3 pairs of jeans... teal, khaki and berry.. If I were to dye them with black fabric dye, would they turn darker or just get completely ruined? Thanks
    I used Dylon, the colour Velvet Black, attempting to due a grey top, red vans and a khaki coat black. My grey top went blue, my vans turned a blood red and my coat was just a darker green! They're not as good as they make their brand out to be. I'm going to try and put a second dye on, see if that works. You should test a piece of clothing you're not bothered about ruining, just to test it, good luck!


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    (Original post by cherieceag)
    I used Dylon, the colour Velvet Black, attempting to due a grey top, red vans and a khaki coat black. My grey top went blue, my vans turned a blood red and my coat was just a darker green! They're not as good as they make their brand out to be. I'm going to try and put a second dye on, see if that works. You should test a piece of clothing you're not bothered about ruining, just to test it, good luck!


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    Thanks! How much dye did you use? And did you put them all in the wash together?
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    (Original post by Miss Purple)
    Thanks! How much dye did you use? And did you put them all in the wash together?
    I used the whole sachet, I didn't put them in the wash, I used them in a large washing up bowl instead


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    I haven't found any issues with dylon at all, you just have to use the right amount of hand dye to get what your after. A 50g sachet will only dye 250g of dry clothing. So that would take a hell of alot more to do your vans coat and top.

    Defo recommended!
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    A word on Fabric Dyes: one very important thing to remember when dyeing fabrics, is to find out the construction and fabric contents before you start, otherwise you can ruin your garment, if the fabric is 100% cotton or any other natural fabric then you can dye it using various Dylon dyes, at low temperatures but if the fabric you want to dye is 100% polyester or has any polyester content then you got very little chance of getting any domestic DIY dye to work.
    If used you might see a change in colour, for example, if you wanted to dye a white polyester shirt to black chances are it will end up as a light shade of grey.
    Here is another scenario have you ever dyed a cotton garment and found the stitching did not take the colour..? This is because the stitching thread used is polyester..!
    There is a reason for this why standard domestic dyes don’t work on polyester, the reason is simple, polyester fibres will only take on the dye at a very high temperatures 300c upwards, this kind of temperatures cannot be archived in standard household setups, you would need special high temperature equipment to get the water to boil above 100c. If you can archive this then you would have a chance of dying polyester fibres.
 
 
 
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