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    Hi there,

    I am currently working on a big 4 grad scheme but seriously considering returning to uni to study for a masters.

    I graduated with a 2.1 in BSc Economics from University of Southampton about 10 months ago. I can't remember my average but it was somewhere around 66/68.

    I'm after some advice on how to choose where to study...

    I hope to be an economist, as I am not enjoying my grad scheme and want to do something that I find interesting and challenging. I am particularly interested in the GES, as well as other economist roles.

    My initial thought was to look at LSE/UCL as they would be great for prospects, being excellent uni's as well as in London. But there is no way I can afford the fees.

    So I've worked out my options based on cost seem to be Bristol/Bath. Are there any other good options I am missing bearing in mind the fees need to be sub £10k.

    Is there a definitive list of the best post grad uni's for Economics? Is it pretty much the same as undergrad? How about competition for post grad? I'm guessing (for obvious reasons) that post grad courses aren't as competitive so if you have the grades you should get in?

    Another factor, unless it was seriously going to enhance my job prospects then I wouldn't want to go too far north. Presently I live in Southampton, and would certainly consider uni's like Manchester too unless the course really offered something different.

    What is Royal Holloway like? I noticed they only have 10 places for their Msc Policy Economics, and it could be quite good to be in such a tight knit group...

    Oh yes, and also worth mentioning is that I am looking at courses with a public policy element to them, or even development economics, as these are areas that interest me.

    I also saw a course at Reading which was MSc Economic Development in Emerging Markets which seemed potentially very interesting. But from what I remember about applying to places for undergrad, it's economics department isn't great right?

    All advice and help much appreciated.

    Many thanks.
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    So a bit of a bump but also and update.

    Dug out my degree certificates to look at my results and I actually averaged 65 for my degree. I averaged 68 in my final year, but only 60 in my 2nd year...also in first year my average was only 59.

    Will this effect my chances at somewhere like bristol for their masters programme?

    There are reasons why they are worse in first and second year but they aren't particularly mitigating, but as an example I got 54 in second year on the introductory econometrics module and then 67 on the advanced module, so it wasn't due to not being capable.
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    I saw someone on Linkedin with a 2:1 in Economics from Southampton who, 8 years after graduation is a mining equity analyst at Credit Suisse, so the bachelor's degree alone is adequate for a successful career.

    I find that most Masters degrees are either two things: rise up the ranks in terms of prestige - or to specialize.

    So to the LSE for much of the same - for the prestige or to Reading to specialize.

    My opinion is the Bristol and Bath would offer much of the same - without much increase in prestige.

    Perhaps give it some more time and see what changes and what you're passionate about.

    I personally would consider getting a more international perspective - New York or Geneva - NYU or the Graduate Institute Geneva.
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    If development is something you are keen on, then SOAS and Sussex spring to mind and could be strategic choices. If you are keen on public economics, then Bristol has a course tailored around that.

    But, that said. You were at Southampton previously, and live in Southampton now. I would recommending sending an email to Jackie Wahba and Roman Sustek and speaking with them. Southampton's MSc programme, especially the Economics and Econometrics course, is rigorous and well respected within academic circles. Also, both Jackie and Roman are actively involved with economic consultancies and research centres.

    Apart from that, have you considered abroad? Often you can get a good degree, for much less, and experience a new culture. Sweden (Stockholm), France (Paris, Toulouse), Spain (Barcelona GSE, Carlos III Madrid, CEFMI Madrid) and Belgium (ECARES) are good places.
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    I saw yesterday that the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München offers an english speaking MSc Economics.

    http://www.en.uni-muenchen.de/studen...ics/index.html

    Could be something to consider?
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    (Original post by Protagoras)
    I saw yesterday that the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München offers an english speaking MSc Economics.

    http://www.en.uni-muenchen.de/studen...ics/index.html

    Could be something to consider?
    A number of German universities offer English taught MSc programmes.

    To name a few:
    http://www.hwr-berlin.de/en/departme...nal-economics/
    http://master.vwl.uni-mannheim.de/
    http://www.econ.uni-bonn.de/studying/master

    But, I would be wary of German programmes. They are not perceived as being very good. Although maybe they are understated and Spanish ones overstated as is sometimes thought.

    But also, while thinking about it, although foreign universities are increasingly turning to English for the course language, you really need a basic grasp of the language to get around the cities, etc. and actually live there.
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    Dear All,

    I have made application to diploma programme at Warwick, Nottingham and Bristol along with Masters programme at Mannheim.

    By mistake my referee had sent the recommendation letter at Mannheim stating to me as a strong candidate for graduate diploma in economics. Will it affect my chances or Should I speak to my referee to make the required changes by e-mailing the Mannheim.

    Please help me, as I strongly feel that Mannheim is the University where I wish to study.
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    (Original post by MR.Patel)
    Dear All,

    I have made application to diploma programme at Warwick, Nottingham and Bristol along with Masters programme at Mannheim.

    By mistake my referee had sent the recommendation letter at Mannheim stating to me as a strong candidate for graduate diploma in economics. Will it affect my chances or Should I speak to my referee to make the required changes by e-mailing the Mannheim.

    Please help me, as I strongly feel that Mannheim is the University where I wish to study.
    It is probably best that your referee clarify things.
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    Thanks for the replies, much appreciated.

    Have a lot of thinking to do...the SOAS courses look especially interesting as there are quite a lot of different specialisms you can do. Southampton is also worth thinking about. Will also check out Sussex.

    I would love to go abroad for the experience as well as the cheaper fees. The only issue is funding, I have no savings and only the £10k loan.

    In the UK I'll receive financial support in the form of benefits due to my personal situation but I'm not sure what support (if any) I would get if I studied abroad.

    Thanks again.

    Ryan.
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    Right, so a bit of an update.

    The Southampton option became tempting especially after finding out alumni get 10% discount.

    SOAS looked really good because of the specialisms, but I just couldn't afford to live in London is the issue.

    The leading candidate is bristol just because the course is tailored to public economics, and I think 2nd is Southampton right now.
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    So a further update...

    I've officially applied for the Bristol course, just awaiting a decision now.

    London has now become an option again as my gf is also doing a masters, and her course is quite specialised, so there are a limited number of places she can do it, fortunately both Bristol and London are two of those places, so no London is an option.

    I looked into SOAS quite seriously but I'm not 100% sure about whether I would want to do development now.

    What are the sub £10k options in London?

    I found a course at University of Westminster which is MSc International Economic Policy and Analysis, it looks quite interesting and is very applied, which I like. It is also accredited by the GES. My concern is that Westminster is basically an ex polytechnic and I'm not sure how good the teaching and the actual course content will be. My other concern is that the course will hold no weight beyond going into the GES, although it is sub £10k and benefits from a central London location.

    Another course I liked the look of was MSc Economic Competition and Regulation at City University London, which would be interesting and could lead to some interesting work at a consultancy in the future, however it is at the top end of the budget, being £9k and also the course has a preference for people with professional experience. Also I only just meet the minimum requirements (an average of 65+). I also wonder if I may be better off keeping my options open and doing just an MSc Economics if I can't find a good enough Economics and Public Policy course in budget and in London.

    Queen Mary does MSc Econ for £5.5k, are there any other courses people would recommend that are sub £10k and in London? It's tough because I'm on a tight budget and don't want to end up on the wrong course...

    Thanks,
    Ryan.
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    (Original post by montyr)
    So a further update...

    I've officially applied for the Bristol course, just awaiting a decision now.

    London has now become an option again as my gf is also doing a masters, and her course is quite specialised, so there are a limited number of places she can do it, fortunately both Bristol and London are two of those places, so no London is an option.

    I looked into SOAS quite seriously but I'm not 100% sure about whether I would want to do development now.

    What are the sub £10k options in London?

    I found a course at University of Westminster which is MSc International Economic Policy and Analysis, it looks quite interesting and is very applied, which I like. It is also accredited by the GES. My concern is that Westminster is basically an ex polytechnic and I'm not sure how good the teaching and the actual course content will be. My other concern is that the course will hold no weight beyond going into the GES, although it is sub £10k and benefits from a central London location.

    Another course I liked the look of was MSc Economic Competition and Regulation at City University London, which would be interesting and could lead to some interesting work at a consultancy in the future, however it is at the top end of the budget, being £9k and also the course has a preference for people with professional experience. Also I only just meet the minimum requirements (an average of 65+). I also wonder if I may be better off keeping my options open and doing just an MSc Economics if I can't find a good enough Economics and Public Policy course in budget and in London.

    Queen Mary does MSc Econ for £5.5k, are there any other courses people would recommend that are sub £10k and in London? It's tough because I'm on a tight budget and don't want to end up on the wrong course...

    Thanks,
    Ryan.
    The most financially viable options in London would be Queen Mary and City. Everything else is either above your budget or not worth the time.

    I would say don't worry about doing a specialised or applied economics degree. Just do a bog-standard MSc Economics programme and choose relevant optional modules. Having an MSc Economics Consulting in Regulation and Competition Economics vs. an MSc Economics, well in all honesty, the traditional MSc Economics gives a better impression. This holds equally true for both GES and also private economic consultancy firms. Further, you get a better grounding in all the key areas of economics.

    If you want a strong programme in London that is less than £10 000, then you'll have to opt for QMUL. To be honest, they do a good programme and their department produces extremely respectable research (especially in macro/finance/metrics).
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    Yeh do MSC econ not a variation.Have you considered Edinburgh University it has a great reputation and name and the course cost is £5000 for home students in uk so a great price and the course if fantastic.
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    (Original post by .ACS.)
    The most financially viable options in London would be Queen Mary and City. Everything else is either above your budget or not worth the time.

    I would say don't worry about doing a specialised or applied economics degree. Just do a bog-standard MSc Economics programme and choose relevant optional modules. Having an MSc Economics Consulting in Regulation and Competition Economics vs. an MSc Economics, well in all honesty, the traditional MSc Economics gives a better impression. This holds equally true for both GES and also private economic consultancy firms. Further, you get a better grounding in all the key areas of economics.

    If you want a strong programme in London that is less than £10 000, then you'll have to opt for QMUL. To be honest, they do a good programme and their department produces extremely respectable research (especially in macro/finance/metrics).
    Thanks for the reply!

    You are the oracle of economics MSc's!

    Will scrap the westminster application, I suspected it could be a waste of time other than for the GES. I'll apply to QMUL, potentially city although 9k seems steep (I think the straight Econ course is the same price). May also apply to SOAS, as MSc Development Econ looks like straight econ except with a module on growth and development, the only downside is they don't do a public economics module as an option.

    I would look at courses like the one at Edinburgh but a big part of affording a masters is living with my gf, and she wants to do a planning course that is RTPI accredited and only a limited of number of uni's do that course, those mainly being UWE in bristol and a number of London uni's.

    Thanks again,
    Ryan.
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    (Original post by montyr)
    Thanks for the reply!

    You are the oracle of economics MSc's!

    Will scrap the westminster application, I suspected it could be a waste of time other than for the GES. I'll apply to QMUL, potentially city although 9k seems steep (I think the straight Econ course is the same price). May also apply to SOAS, as MSc Development Econ looks like straight econ except with a module on growth and development, the only downside is they don't do a public economics module as an option.

    I would look at courses like the one at Edinburgh but a big part of affording a masters is living with my gf, and she wants to do a planning course that is RTPI accredited and only a limited of number of uni's do that course, those mainly being UWE in bristol and a number of London uni's.

    Thanks again,
    Ryan.
    If I had to choose between QMUL and City, I'd opt for QMUL. The course is better, and also QMUL have stronger links with government economic departments in the UK and Europe.

    SOAS is good if you are keen on development issues, but honestly, I'd be wary of SOAS. The main reason is because of their heterodox approach to teaching. Basically they like to avoid the use of mathematics or econometrics. Their focus is essays and a more discursive approach; essentially it is more political economy. Great if you want to work in a think-tank or similar, but not ideal if you want to become a professional economist where you need to make use of econometrics and mathematical models.

    Best of luck with your applications! If you have any further concerns or questions, don't hesitate to ask.

    (BTW, I gave you positive rep since it looked like the only reason you were negged was either due to not considering Edinburgh or not considering Greenwich, and honestly, you're right for not considering either.)
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    Good news.

    Got an offer from Bristol today for their Economics and Public Policy course. This is the course I really wanted to do, it has the standard macro/micro/econometrics but also core modules in applied economics. Seems the perfect course for where I want to go with it :-)

    I have until the middle of July to respond. I also have an assessment centre with the GES coming up, and would rather work at the GES and do a masters later if I can so going to wait until I hear back from them before accepting :-)

    I probably won't bother applying to QMUL now as Bristol was always my first choice, although QMUL could have advantages through networking and access to work experience, as well as the investment club, but I think Bristol has pretty good access to employers and economic consultancies, as well as having the CMPO.

    Anyway, good news, was concerned about my lack of any 3rd year Econometrics, as I chose the more applied modules, but I got a high 2.1 on methods of econometrics in 2nd year which I pointed to in my PS.

    Thanks again for all the help and support!
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    (Original post by montyr)
    Hi there,

    I am currently working on a big 4 grad scheme but seriously considering returning to uni to study for a masters.

    I graduated with a 2.1 in BSc Economics from University of Southampton about 10 months ago. I can't remember my average but it was somewhere around 66/68.

    I'm after some advice on how to choose where to study...

    I hope to be an economist, as I am not enjoying my grad scheme and want to do something that I find interesting and challenging. I am particularly interested in the GES, as well as other economist roles.

    My initial thought was to look at LSE/UCL as they would be great for prospects, being excellent uni's as well as in London. But there is no way I can afford the fees.

    So I've worked out my options based on cost seem to be Bristol/Bath. Are there any other good options I am missing bearing in mind the fees need to be sub £10k.

    Is there a definitive list of the best post grad uni's for Economics? Is it pretty much the same as undergrad? How about competition for post grad? I'm guessing (for obvious reasons) that post grad courses aren't as competitive so if you have the grades you should get in?

    Another factor, unless it was seriously going to enhance my job prospects then I wouldn't want to go too far north. Presently I live in Southampton, and would certainly consider uni's like Manchester too unless the course really offered something different.

    What is Royal Holloway like? I noticed they only have 10 places for their Msc Policy Economics, and it could be quite good to be in such a tight knit group...

    Oh yes, and also worth mentioning is that I am looking at courses with a public policy element to them, or even development economics, as these are areas that interest me.

    I also saw a course at Reading which was MSc Economic Development in Emerging Markets which seemed potentially very interesting. But from what I remember about applying to places for undergrad, it's economics department isn't great right?

    All advice and help much appreciated.

    Many thanks.
    Don't waste your money in Manchester (I'm wasting mine now ). You will get the same material as in any other university but teaching is CRAP. I'm talking about MSC in Economics btw. The university itself is really nice, a lot of facilities, everything cool...but definitely in that department they don't care about master students, it's just a cash cow. Now, if you don't care about teaching and you want something rigurous and with a cool name Man-chésss-ter, then you're very welcome. Hope it helps.
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    (Original post by Econla)
    Don't waste your money in Manchester (I'm wasting mine now ). You will get the same material as in any other university but teaching is CRAP. I'm talking about MSC in Economics btw. The university itself is really nice, a lot of facilities, everything cool...but definitely in that department they don't care about master students, it's just a cash cow. Now, if you don't care about teaching and you want something rigurous and with a cool name Man-chésss-ter, then you're very welcome. Hope it helps.
    Hey. Sorry to hear you're not enjoying Manchester! How have you found the year, everything okay? Any other problems you've experienced? Also are you going onto a PhD next or work?
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    (Original post by .ACS.)
    Hey. Sorry to hear you're not enjoying Manchester! How have you found the year, everything okay? Any other problems you've experienced? Also are you going onto a PhD next or work?
    Well, the programme is not easy to be honest, I mean you could expect something less rigorous given this is just Manchester and not LSE or Oxbridge. But it is tough, specially in metrics courses. No essays, just 100% 1 exam per course (problem solving, proofs and some blah blah questions in some cases).
    The courses are not applied but very technical ones.
    You still have the option of an MA in Economics which I have heard that is more applied (no proofs and all that stuff).

    Cheers
 
 
 
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