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Am I revising too much for IGCSE? What results should I get for top US unis? Watch

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    I am 3/4 through my 2 week Easter break now, and basically I've been studying around 9 hours everyday (except for 3 days).

    Is this too much? I've only just started revising at Easter, I haven't done any revision before. I am aiming to rewrite all my notes by the end of this break.

    After the Easter break, I have 2 more weeks of school, and then another 2 weeks of study leave before my exams. During these 4 weeks I am planning to do past papers.

    Am I giving enough time for past papers? Am I doing something wrong, or is my revision plan fine? I really want to get into good unis in the US, what results should I be aiming for (how many a*, a, b out of 10)?
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    When I was studying for my GCSE's, I wasn't even thinking about getting into university.

    Realistically speaking, to get into any of the top 10 US universities, you'd want at least AAA in A-Level, and a good SAT score. Bare in mind that US universities don't really care too much about your GCSE's, they are more inclined to test you psychometrically, using your A-levels as a little leverage.

    A friend of mine received 5 A*'s at A-Level, alongside 12 A*'s at GCSE, but was declined from MIT due to insufficient SAT scores.

    For now, just get good GCSE's. Don't set yourself dream-targets, just do as well as you possibly can, and join university hype when you're in sixth form/college.
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    A's and A*'s - the best grades. You also want to start thinking about volunteering/achievements/leadership etc. to stick in your application/personal statement.

    I think it's fine to dream big, because if you don't have a dream, you can't chase a dream. Extra-curriculars matter a lot, probably more than just grades as everyone can get grades but not everyone is a pillar of their local community.
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    (Original post by Leondrip)
    When I was studying for my GCSE's, I wasn't even thinking about getting into university.

    Realistically speaking, to get into any of the top 10 US universities, you'd want at least AAA in A-Level, and a good SAT score. Bare in mind that US universities don't really care too much about your GCSE's, they are more inclined to test you psychometrically, using your A-levels as a little leverage.

    A friend of mine received 5 A*'s at A-Level, alongside 12 A*'s at GCSE, but was declined from MIT due to insufficient SAT scores.

    For now, just get good GCSE's. Don't set yourself dream-targets, just do as well as you possibly can, and join university hype when you're in sixth form/college.
    Don't they use IGCSE grades as GPA for year 11s?
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    Its not about doing X number of hours will mean you get X number of A*s.

    You could be sitting there for 12 hours not absorbing anything, or you could be there for 6 hours focussed and absorbed twice the amount of information.
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    How recognised are the IGCSE exams in the US? Around what scores should I be aiming for which would be equivalent to getting 3.8 and above?
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    Most US universities will only look at your A-levels and SAT scores. It's a good idea to have lots of extra curriculars too as they put much more emphasis on them over there.
    Being at a very high level in a sport alongside average grades is usually good enough to get you into a very good university there.


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