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    Hey all,

    So I was just wondering. I still haven't figured out what career path to go down yet so I want to try out a variety of jobs. At the moment, I have worked at a creative agency for the experience. I want to try out journalism by becoming an intern, and then possibly at MTV if possible.

    The thing is, what would employers think of this on my CV? Would they think that I'm not very dedicated as I have had so many jobs in different areas?

    Or should I just not include irrelevant jobs? But then what if they ask what I did during that time?

    Some help and advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    AC.
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    It can be problematic if you have lots of different things on your CV - people may wonder if you are committed to what you are applying for. The best thing to do is to make sure you use your covering letter to explain what you have done.
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    Hi,

    I think it is fine to do different jobs as long as you can justify reasons for moving on - for example - if each move is career progression then it is worth showing that you are developing.

    If you are planning on doing lots of different types of jobs you may want to group them under a heading on your CV such as 'Relevant Experience' and bulk the information together. 'Job Hopping' can look bad to some employers, credible employers should be matching you based on your ability to do the role, rather than how many jobs you have had.

    Also - the graduate market is tricky so as a recruiter I expect graduates to have moved about a bit...you would be very lucky to find your dream job straight away!
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    It's just as important to find out what you do not like doing as it is finding out what you do like doing. A lot of people tend to forget that. Just before I went to uni, I spent a year in banking after my A-levels. After that year, I was convinced I was not cut out for banking - I didn't have the temperament nor aptitude. Also, I didn't like the 'screw the customer, make as much money as possible' attitude of the industry.

    What that allows you to do is to shut off dead ends and avenues that lead you down the wrong path. You can say to yourself that you gave something a decent shot, it wasn't for you, move on. At the same time, it's useful to have some sort of a vision of where you'd like to be in say, five years time. Not a set in stone plan, but rather one where you ask in your heart of hearts where you'd like to be, answer that question and then ask your head to work out how you might get there. Just after graduating I did that. I describe it as aiming for the stars, climbing to the top of the tree and then realising how beautiful the view was from there. OK, I sort of fell off of the tree, but I don't regret a minute that journey.
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    (Original post by MarieM89)
    Hi,

    I think it is fine to do different jobs as long as you can justify reasons for moving on - for example - if each move is career progression then it is worth showing that you are developing.

    If you are planning on doing lots of different types of jobs you may want to group them under a heading on your CV such as 'Relevant Experience' and bulk the information together. 'Job Hopping' can look bad to some employers, credible employers should be matching you based on your ability to do the role, rather than how many jobs you have had.

    Also - the graduate market is tricky so as a recruiter I expect graduates to have moved about a bit...you would be very lucky to find your dream job straight away!
    Hi, sorry for the late reply. Your answer has made me feel a little better as I know that it's okay to try out different jobs thanks so much for the input! Can I ask what you are a recruiter for?

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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    It's just as important to find out what you do not like doing as it is finding out what you do like doing. A lot of people tend to forget that. Just before I went to uni, I spent a year in banking after my A-levels. After that year, I was convinced I was not cut out for banking - I didn't have the temperament nor aptitude. Also, I didn't like the 'screw the customer, make as much money as possible' attitude of the industry.

    What that allows you to do is to shut off dead ends and avenues that lead you down the wrong path. You can say to yourself that you gave something a decent shot, it wasn't for you, move on. At the same time, it's useful to have some sort of a vision of where you'd like to be in say, five years time. Not a set in stone plan, but rather one where you ask in your heart of hearts where you'd like to be, answer that question and then ask your head to work out how you might get there. Just after graduating I did that. I describe it as aiming for the stars, climbing to the top of the tree and then realising how beautiful the view was from there. OK, I sort of fell off of the tree, but I don't regret a minute that journey.
    That's an amazing way to describe it! It was very encouraging to read, thank you. I'm glad you found a beautiful view, I hope I find mine soon.

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    (Original post by Little Jules)
    It can be problematic if you have lots of different things on your CV - people may wonder if you are committed to what you are applying for. The best thing to do is to make sure you use your covering letter to explain what you have done.
    I will that into account thanks

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    I think that it's certainly better than no experience!

    It's all about how you work it into skills that you've gained through these experiences. If anything a bit of variety is a good thing. Doing X job for years might make you an expert in that job but if you can show that you have been successful at learning new things, adapting to different work environments and pressures, meeting and working well with new colleagues and so on then surely that will read well in your CV.

    Just how I see it and how it worked out for me
 
 
 
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