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    I like to think really far ahead when planning things like what unis I'll be going to.
    This September I'll be starting a neuroscience MSci programme, but I know I'll be wanting master's in both something psychology related and something neuroscience related (and maybe a chemistry one too) before doing a PhD for something neuroscience related.

    Am I limited to BPS conversion courses if I want the degree to be worth something? Am I going to end up needed two psychology master's so that I have both the accreditation and something relevant to what I'd like to study?
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    (Original post by WhimsyMelody)
    I like to think really far ahead when planning things like what unis I'll be going to.
    This September I'll be starting a neuroscience MSci programme, but I know I'll be wanting master's in both something psychology related and something neuroscience related (and maybe a chemistry one too) before doing a PhD for something neuroscience related.

    Am I limited to BPS conversion courses if I want the degree to be worth something? Am I going to end up needed two psychology master's so that I have both the accreditation and something relevant to what I'd like to study?
    Is there a reason why you are planning on so many Masters degrees? They are very expensive and I have never seen any requirements for more than one (relevant) Msc when it comes to applying for a PhD. If you are very lucky you might be able to go straight from Msci (I assume this is a a 4-5 year undergrad course?) to PhD.
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    You'd only need a BPS accreditation if you wanted to do a vocational doctorate, e.g. clinical, educational, forensic (correct me if I'm wrong). I don't see why you would need to do a BPS conversion course after a neuroscience degree if you want to do a PhD in neuroscience?
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    (Original post by Bluth.)
    Is there a reason why you are planning on so many Masters degrees? They are very expensive and I have never seen any requirements for more than one (relevant) Msc when it comes to applying for a PhD. If you are very lucky you might be able to go straight from Msci (I assume this is a a 4-5 year undergrad course?) to PhD.
    Yeah it's 4 years undergrad. I was told that if I work hard, I'd be able to go straight to a PhD. And a note on the money: master's degrees are a lot less expensive than if I were to do one here (in America).
    However, there are several reasons I want to have multiple master's.
    One is for my visa. I'd really like to settle in the UK, and unless I find someone to sponsor me for work (and I've heard it's difficult to change from a student visa to a work visa), I need to be in the UK legally (student visa!) for ten years before I can apply for residency (unless I find someone to marry).
    Secondly, I want a master's in psychology because I might want to incorporate it into my work.
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    You want to stay in the UK for 10 years on a student visa? :confused:

    Usually, masters programmes last a year and it takes about 3 years to do a phd. So you'd have to do 7 masters degrees and a phd? International students are not allowed to do part-time masters. Or am I not getting something?
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    (Original post by WhimsyMelody)
    Yeah it's 4 years undergrad. I was told that if I work hard, I'd be able to go straight to a PhD. And a note on the money: master's degrees are a lot less expensive than if I were to do one here (in America).
    However, there are several reasons I want to have multiple master's.
    One is for my visa. I'd really like to settle in the UK, and unless I find someone to sponsor me for work (and I've heard it's difficult to change from a student visa to a work visa), I need to be in the UK legally (student visa!) for ten years before I can apply for residency (unless I find someone to marry).
    Secondly, I want a master's in psychology because I might want to incorporate it into my work.
    Just because there is something more expensive out there still doesn't mean the cheaper option is good value for money. You have to be very rich to afford the international fees year after year. I also think admissions tutors may be suspicious of you multiple degrees, and residency is not a good enough reason for doing a PhD.
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    (Original post by Bluth.)
    Just because there is something more expensive out there still doesn't mean the cheaper option is good value for money. You have to be very rich to afford the international fees year after year. I also think admissions tutors may be suspicious of you multiple degrees, and residency is not a good enough reason for doing a PhD.
    I feel you misunderstood what I said. I need a PhD. There's no doubt about it. I need a PhD for my field. Beyond that, I want to work at a university. Also, regarding money, it's a non-issue.
    Having more than one master's would be to kill time and to have British qualifications (I have a psychology degree from an american 2-year uni).
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    (Original post by WhimsyMelody)
    I feel you misunderstood what I said. I need a PhD. There's no doubt about it. I need a PhD for my field. Beyond that, I want to work at a university. Also, regarding money, it's a non-issue.
    Having more than one master's would be to kill time and to have British qualifications (I have a psychology degree from an american 2-year uni).
    Ok, so I think it is admirable that you want a solid grounding of several academic fields. If you have the time, money and motivation to go through several high intensity courses then go for it. Just be aware that having multiple Msc may be perceived (rightly or wrongly) as a lack of direction (PhDs tend to have a very narrow focus) and are probably a better indication of wealth than ability, seeing as most people can barely afford one.
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    (Original post by WhimsyMelody)
    I like to think really far ahead when planning things like what unis I'll be going to.
    This September I'll be starting a neuroscience MSci programme, but I know I'll be wanting master's in both something psychology related and something neuroscience related (and maybe a chemistry one too) before doing a PhD for something neuroscience related.

    Am I limited to BPS conversion courses if I want the degree to be worth something? Am I going to end up needed two psychology master's so that I have both the accreditation and something relevant to what I'd like to study?
    I imagine a lot of the neuroscience stuff will be comparable to having a BPS accredited undergraduate degree in psychology anyway. I would simply do a master's degree in whichever area of psychology is most relevant to your doctoral research. It does not have to be BPS accredited. That only matters if you are applying for a psychology PhD, not a neuroscience one, and is obviously linked to the area you are looking to work in (e.g. forensics).

    So your academic timetable for the next decade will end up with something like this:

    2013-17 MSci - neuroscience
    2017-18 MA/MSc - psychology
    2018-21 PhD - neuroscience



    Doing more than than one master's degree after your original MSci will just make you look flaky, whether you can afford to pay for them or not. I cannot for the life of me work out why you need a master's degree in chemistry, for example.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    I imagine a lot of the neuroscience stuff will be comparable to having a BPS accredited undergraduate degree in psychology anyway. I would simply do a master's degree in whichever area of psychology is most relevant to your doctoral research. It does not have to be BPS accredited. That only matters if you are applying for a psychology PhD, not a neuroscience one, and is obviously linked to the area you are looking to work in (e.g. forensics).

    So your academic timetable for the next decade will end up with something like this:

    2013-17 MSci - neuroscience
    2017-18 MA/MSc - psychology
    2018-21 PhD - neuroscience



    Doing more than than one master's degree after your original MSci will just make you look flaky, whether you can afford to pay for them or not. I cannot for the life of me work out why you need a master's degree in chemistry, for example.
    Oh, I probably should have noted, I'd like to do my PhD in something very close to abnormal neuropsychology. It's what I really want to study, but I definitely need a background in neuroscience.

    I understand that a chem MSc might make me look flaky--I just really love chemistry and would want more of it than what I'd get doing my neuroscience MSci.
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    (Original post by WhimsyMelody)
    Oh, I probably should have noted, I'd like to do my PhD in something very close to abnormal neuropsychology. It's what I really want to study, but I definitely need a background in neuroscience.

    I understand that a chem MSc might make me look flaky--I just really love chemistry and would want more of it than what I'd get doing my neuroscience MSci.
    Fair enough. Out of interest, where will you be studying?

    It its good that you are thinking ahead, but the reality is your academic interests will change once you start studying more in depth. Heck, you might find that you do even like the UK and want to do your doctorate back home! For example, when I did not secure PhD funding, I worked in a prison loved it. I am starting a more vocational degree in speech and language therapy this September to follow these interests. My old interests I will posture in my own time.

    Another thing has sprung to mind: with regards to residency, any time spent studying is not included so you would need to find a job our husband if you wanted to start here in the long term.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    Fair enough. Out of interest, where will you be studying?

    It its good that you are thinking ahead, but the reality is your academic interests will change once you start studying more in depth. Heck, you might find that you do even like the UK and want to do your doctorate back home! For example, when I did not secure PhD funding, I worked in a prison loved it. I am starting a more vocational degree in speech and language therapy this September to follow these interests. My old interests I will posture in my own time.

    Another thing has sprung to mind: with regards to residency, any time spent studying is not included so you would need to find a job our husband if you wanted to start here in the long term.
    Wow really? Ugghhh... Well that just shoots my residency plans!
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    (Original post by WhimsyMelody)
    Wow really? Ugghhh... Well that just shoots my residency plans!
    I believe so.

    You will just have to get yourself a British boyfriend!
 
 
 
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