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    I'm new to the forum, so please excuse me if I'm posting in the wrong place, or asking questions already answered before!

    I want to research potential Law firms to apply to at the end of my degree, and I'm looking for advice as to where to look. Aside from Google-ing where is the best place to find and review potential employers? Am I best to look online, or does anyone use those printed guides in the careers services?
    Any advice greatly appreciated!
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    lawcareers.net (lcn) is the beginning, end and middle of this sort of thing.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    lawcareers.net (lcn) is the beginning, end and middle of this sort of thing.
    Almost. However there are training contracts out there that don't appear on Lawcareers.net.

    Fraser Brown are a decent Nottingham firm.

    Here are two recent trainees

    http://www.fraserbrown.com/ourpeople/natalie-barnes

    http://www.fraserbrown.com/ourpeople/liam-wilkinson

    Not a sniff of the firm on Lawcareers.net. tThey have no vacancies at present but that isn't the basis on whether a firm appears.
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    I advise Chambers Student Guide
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    It's true that Fraser Brown aren't on LC.N - firms have to approve their listing to appear on the site, so not every firm offering a TC will be there.

    However, with currently 924 firms listed and 179 Chambers, I think that's there is still plenty of information to be a comprehensive directory.

    You can search by region; work areas; placements; number of staff etc. here: https://www.lawcareers.net/Solicitors/AdvancedSearch

    Also, definitely worth having a look at the print directories in careers services in conjunction with online research - can be helpful to make notes on firm profile pages etc.

    Good luck studyingstanley
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    Thanks for the pointers. Will definitely hop over to LC.net

    Do you think the fact that some firms choose not to list themselves in the print directories has any bearing on their position in the graduate marketplace? I note that Fraser Brown mentioned above aren't on LC.net but doesn't mean to say they shouldn't be a serious consideration. Would you treat a firms inclusion or omission from the print directories with a pinch of salt? I imagine there's a hefty advertising fee to be included which many companies will want to cut out of their budgets given the tightening of marketing purse strings.
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    (Original post by FrannieC)
    It's true that Fraser Brown aren't on LC.N - firms have to approve their listing to appear on the site, so not every firm offering a TC will be there.

    However, with currently 924 firms listed and 179 Chambers, I think that's there is still plenty of information to be a comprehensive directory.

    You can search by region; work areas; placements; number of staff etc. here: https://www.lawcareers.net/Solicitors/AdvancedSearch

    Also, definitely worth having a look at the print directories in careers services in conjunction with online research - can be helpful to make notes on firm profile pages etc.

    Good luck studyingstanley

    (Original post by studyingstanley)
    Thanks for the pointers. Will definitely hop over to LC.net

    Do you think the fact that some firms choose not to list themselves in the print directories has any bearing on their position in the graduate marketplace? I note that Fraser Brown mentioned above aren't on LC.net but doesn't mean to say they shouldn't be a serious consideration. Would you treat a firms inclusion or omission from the print directories with a pinch of salt? I imagine there's a hefty advertising fee to be included which many companies will want to cut out of their budgets given the tightening of marketing purse strings.
    I think the print directories are dying.

    You have to remember that the probability is that the really big boys are getting free entries. If you don't have Clifford Chance, your directory lacks credibility. Therefore it is unlikely the publisher will be able to force them to pay.

    Recruitment clients of the publishers are likely to get an entry as part of their package.

    I wonder how many others are culled the first time the finance manager reviews subscriptions

    My firm haven't appeared in print directories for years and it doesn't stop us getting enough applications to paper the walls of the offices.

    Obtaining a TC is a competitive game. Finding a vacancy few others know about is like finding a parking space that no-one has spotted.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I think the print directories are dying.

    You have to remember that the probability is that the really big boys are getting free entries. If you don't have Clifford Chance, your directory lacks credibility. Therefore it is unlikely the publisher will be able to force them to pay.

    Recruitment clients of the publishers are likely to get an entry as part of their package.

    I wonder how many others are culled the first time the finance manager reviews subscriptions

    My firm haven't appeared in print directories for years and it doesn't stop us getting enough applications to paper the walls of the offices.

    Obtaining a TC is a competitive game. Finding a vacancy few others know about is like finding a parking space that no-one has spotted.
    See, I disagree. I suspect that the big boys do pay...

    a) because most of the large law firms are deeply unimaginative and tend to want to keep pace with their peers are doing (just look at how bonus announcements work over in America). Clifford Chance will ask 'Are Linklaters in?' and if the answer is yes, they won't dare not follow suit.

    b) because the smart firms realise they are helping fund independent publications that benefit everybody.

    If the print directories are facing a squeeze, it'll be from the smaller regional firms not having cash to splash.
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    (Original post by richie123)
    See, I disagree. I suspect that the big boys do pay...
    I can't prove to the contrary but I know that one of the other major directories (not for trainees) was giving free entries to the big boys.
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    (Original post by richie123)
    See, I disagree. I suspect that the big boys do pay...

    a) because most of the large law firms are deeply unimaginative and tend to want to keep pace with their peers are doing (just look at how bonus announcements work over in America). Clifford Chance will ask 'Are Linklaters in?' and if the answer is yes, they won't dare not follow suit.

    b) because the smart firms realise they are helping fund independent publications that benefit everybody.

    If the print directories are facing a squeeze, it'll be from the smaller regional firms not having cash to splash.

    I've discovered that firms tend to get a basic profile, but they can choose to enhance this with advertising which they can pay for.

    Really appreciate the thoughts here... so basically am I right in deducing from your experiences that they're worth a flick through but you would be daft to solely rely on these as a source of information. As mentioned earlier, just because a firm is not present doesn't mean that they're not worth considering.

    I notice that Clifford Chance and Linklaters have been mentioned a number of times. Out of interest... if they weren't present in any of the directories next year, would that affect whether you considered them or not? Do you think newer graduates would overlook them when it comes to making applications?
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    (Original post by studyingstanley)
    I right in deducing from your experiences that they're worth a flick through but you would be daft to solely rely on these as a source of information. As mentioned earlier, just because a firm is not present doesn't mean that they're not worth considering.
    The directories are going to be the ideal starting point for your research. None of them are going to be completely comprehensive but Lawcareers and Chambers Student between them they will cover the vast majority of training contracts available in any one year. But of course you'll then want to dig deeper.

    (Original post by studyingstanley)
    I notice that Clifford Chance and Linklaters have been mentioned a number of times. Out of interest... if they weren't present in any of the directories next year, would that affect whether you considered them or not? Do you think newer graduates would overlook them when it comes to making applications?
    Interesting question. Would applications go down if, say, Clifford Chance stopping taking out entries in the guides? Probably not much, because word of mouth and these big firms' presence on campus keeps their visibility up.

    But that's not really the point for the big firms, is it? The point is that they are a source of information about a lot of firms in one place, which saves students trawling through 100s of firm websites in the hope of finding one they might be interested in. I think firms realise that benefits everyone.

    And also, Clifford Chance may continue to get hundreds of applications, but will they all be of the same quality as before? Chambers for example, often inserts lines like "Many students apply to this firm for its famous XXX department, but this actually only makes up Y% of the business and in fact the firm's trying to build Department ZZZ." So while newer graduates might not overlook firms, they might make less informed applications because the lack of an entry makes it slightly more difficult to find information about them.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I think the print directories are dying.

    You have to remember that the probability is that the really big boys are getting free entries. If you don't have Clifford Chance, your directory lacks credibility. Therefore it is unlikely the publisher will be able to force them to pay.

    Recruitment clients of the publishers are likely to get an entry as part of their package.

    I wonder how many others are culled the first time the finance manager reviews subscriptions

    My firm haven't appeared in print directories for years and it doesn't stop us getting enough applications to paper the walls of the offices.

    Obtaining a TC is a competitive game. Finding a vacancy few others know about is like finding a parking space that no-one has spotted.
    LawCareers.Net and The Training Contract & Pupillage Handbook are pretty straight up about how they work. All organisations are offered a free basic listing in the directory and if they chose to pay they can expand their content to provide additional information, logos, links etc. The aim is to give readers an introduction to the full range of options and a starting point for deciding which organisatons to target. The key skill is identify a relatively small number of firms to actually apply to –you can’t make dozens of applications that are good and focussed enough to net a job, there isn’t time. LC.N and TCPH are designed to help readers ask the right questions of themselves and organisations for this distillation process to done efficiently. Firms not appearing in these directories have spurned the offer of a free listing – often because they do not have the systems in place to deal with the volume of applications generated by the entries.

    As for the point about directories dying – not true – even very well resourced firms cannot visit and build links with every campus and the directories ensure their core information is available to all candidates in an accessible format. A directory entry will never provide enough information fro a candidate to move straight to applying, nor should it. As I say above, a successful application will be the result of detailed and determined research of which the directory is the starting point of introduction to a firm. There is plenty of evidence of the value of directories available. A recent, detailed survey of candidates by LawCareers.Net last month (sample 1104 replies) revealed that 88% of respondents had used directories and 68% rated them ‘good’ or ‘very good’. Only firms’ own websites were more highly used or rated (93% & 74%) which is unsurprising – but how do you think people find their way to firms’ own sites?

    The secret to using directories is to understand that they are tools contributing to wider research. The information within is both factual – here is a place where you can find and compare a lot of information, and promotional –firm X realises lots of people use this resource so they have invested in being prominent within it. Information about how to approach the job in hand, finding a training contract, is impartial and well worth heeding. The same mistakes stymie those not getting through year after year.
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    (Original post by FrannieC)
    LawCareers.Net and The Training Contract & Pupillage Handbook are pretty straight up about how they work. All organisations are offered a free basic listing in the directory and if they chose to pay they can expand their content to provide additional information, logos, links etc. The aim is to give readers an introduction to the full range of options and a starting point for deciding which organisatons to target. The key skill is identify a relatively small number of firms to actually apply to –you can’t make dozens of applications that are good and focussed enough to net a job, there isn’t time. LC.N and TCPH are designed to help readers ask the right questions of themselves and organisations for this distillation process to done efficiently. Firms not appearing in these directories have spurned the offer of a free listing – often because they do not have the systems in place to deal with the volume of applications generated by the entries.

    As for the point about directories dying – not true – even very well resourced firms cannot visit and build links with every campus and the directories ensure their core information is available to all candidates in an accessible format. A directory entry will never provide enough information fro a candidate to move straight to applying, nor should it. As I say above, a successful application will be the result of detailed and determined research of which the directory is the starting point of introduction to a firm. There is plenty of evidence of the value of directories available. A recent, detailed survey of candidates by LawCareers.Net last month (sample 1104 replies) revealed that 88% of respondents had used directories and 68% rated them ‘good’ or ‘very good’. Only firms’ own websites were more highly used or rated (93% & 74%) which is unsurprising – but how do you think people find their way to firms’ own sites?

    The secret to using directories is to understand that they are tools contributing to wider research. The information within is both factual – here is a place where you can find and compare a lot of information, and promotional –firm X realises lots of people use this resource so they have invested in being prominent within it. Information about how to approach the job in hand, finding a training contract, is impartial and well worth heeding. The same mistakes stymie those not getting through year after year.
    With respect, I said I thought the print directories were dying. I wonder what the print run is for Chambers Student Guide and the Training Contract and Pupillage Handbook now and what it was five or ten years ago?
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    My firm haven't appeared in print directories for years and it doesn't stop us getting enough applications to paper the walls of the offices.
    I do hope you're not going to use these to replace the skins of disappointing trainees, that would be a most upsetting concession to modernisation.
 
 
 
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