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    I'm doing the iodine clock with hydrogen peroxide.
    i know that in respect with I the order is first, in respect to H202 its first. However for H+ ions, im not sure whether its first or zero. ive read several different things, and now i'm just so confussssed:confused:
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    (Original post by Izar)
    I'm doing the iodine clock with hydrogen peroxide.
    i know that in respect with I the order is first, in respect to H202 its first. However for H+ ions, im not sure whether its first or zero. ive read several different things, and now i'm just so confussssed:confused:
    It's zero order for H+
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    (Original post by ZakRob)
    It's zero order for H+
    i got first order
    how can i tell from a half-life graph that its zeroth order? because for a first order, the half lives remain constant..
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    (Original post by Izar)
    i got first order
    how can i tell from a half-life graph that its zeroth order? because for a first order, the half lives remain constant..
    Is this not for the iodine clock, whereby you'd be timing how long it takes for a colour change to occur. and that would be time, t. then to calculate initial rate of reaction, you would simply use 1/t which is proportional to initial rate of reaction.

    Then when you plot that on a graph you should get a constant horizontal line.

    However for concentration against time graphs look at the image attached, it has examples shown.
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    (Original post by ZakRob)
    Is this not for the iodine clock, whereby you'd be timing how long it takes for a colour change to occur. and that would be time, t. then to calculate initial rate of reaction, you would simply use 1/t which is proportional to initial rate of reaction.

    Then when you plot that on a graph you should get a constant horizontal line.

    However for concentration against time graphs look at the image attached, it has examples shown.

    ahh that means all my data and graphs are wrong for the H+, btw how do you know its zeroth order?
    and thank you so much, i actually understand it now <3
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    (Original post by Izar)
    ahh that means all my data and graphs are wrong for the H+, btw how do you know its zeroth order?
    and thank you so much, i actually understand it now <3
    I only know its zeroth order from a task that I did in chemistry regarding this reaction.
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    It should be zero order
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    (Original post by ZakRob)
    I only know its zeroth order from a task that I did in chemistry regarding this reaction.

    (Original post by grassgrazers01)
    It should be zero order
    Thank you guys <3
    @grassgrazers have you done the coursework?
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    (Original post by Izar)
    Thank you guys <3
    @grassgrazers have you done the coursework?
    I've done the iodine clock using different chemicals, but a friend of mine did it with hydrogen peroxide. He experimentally found the order of H+ ions to be zeroth, and this was later confirmed by my teacher
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    (Original post by grassgrazers01)
    It should be zero order
    Indeed, it is a Harcourt-Essen reaction and should hold zero order
    The reaction needs H+ ions to acidify it and thus reduce the H2O2.
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    (Original post by grassgrazers01)
    I've done the iodine clock using different chemicals, but a friend of mine did it with hydrogen peroxide. He experimentally found the order of H+ ions to be zeroth, and this was later confirmed by my teacher

    (Original post by Chunnikan Smudge)
    Indeed, it is a Harcourt-Essen reaction and should hold zero order
    The reaction needs H+ ions to acidify it and thus reduce the H2O2.
    So can i just check... its first order for H2O2 and I , but zero order for H+?
    thanks guys :')
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    (Original post by Izar)
    So can i just check... its first order for H2O2 and I , but zero order for H+?
    thanks guys :')
    Yes, thats correct for all
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    (Original post by Izar)
    So can i just check... its first order for H2O2 and I , but zero order for H+?
    thanks guys :')
    Yes indeedy :3
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    (Original post by grassgrazers01)
    Yes indeedy :3
    thank you pumpkin :hugs:
 
 
 
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