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    Hi

    I am currently studying my AS levels and am starting to think about what degree I want to do after my gap year. I started off wanting to be a journalist but this then changed into wanting to do marketing/advertising. I love forensic detective programmes and finding out who killed who, etc. I then started to consider law however I'm more of a B student and doubt I will get any A's in my A-Levels. I love learning about the media and study it at the moment so am open to anything to do with that. I was wondering if anyone could help me try and decide what to do because I am stuck! I would like to know what the subjects are like at degree level and whether law and criminology together is a good degree and hard degree to have and whether it's really worth it as I'm not the most academic to be able to breeze through law.

    Thanks!
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    First thing is first, postgraduate is what you do after a degree. You want undergraduate.

    For journalism or media careers, you'll want an English, History or similar humanities degree from a good university if you want the top jobs.

    Forensic Science, no idea, I thought you needed a medicine degree for that, may be wrong. Anyway, if you are basing it on CSI then probably not the best idea for a job tbh.

    For marketing/advertising you could look into any degree along any business related line. Don't rule out STEM subjects for that either such as mathematics or computer science as these are subjects that marketing/advertising companies do like to see. Being such an international sector also, languages can also he useful here.
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    You can do undergrad degrees in Journalism which include the appropriate professional certification. You could get a head-start on an entry-level job with the correct bit of paper, and maybe steal a year on other new starters.

    You can also do Forensic Science degrees, some of which focus on Crime Scene Science. They don't really equip you to go straight into a job like that, but they do give you transferrable lab skills which can be very useful when job hunting in lab-based industries. However, some of those degrees have a significant technical science element which might not suit you if you're looking for something more vocational. Some of my friends who did Forensics degrees sweated buckets over their Biomolecules module. Be careful to check details of degree content when deciding. And it won't be anything like CSI!

    You can also find specialised degrees in Marketing or Advertising. Again, look for ones which will not only give you a degree, but also professional accreditation and the potential for membership of professional organisations. All of these will be good for your CV. Where possible, find ones which include a year's work placement. Although it means taking four years over your degree, you'll come out with professional experience on your CV which can be invaluable.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    You can do undergrad degrees in Journalism which include the appropriate professional certification. You could get a head-start on an entry-level job with the correct bit of paper, and maybe steal a year on other new starters.

    You can also do Forensic Science degrees, some of which focus on Crime Scene Science. They don't really equip you to go straight into a job like that, but they do give you transferrable lab skills which can be very useful when job hunting in lab-based industries. However, some of those degrees have a significant technical science element which might not suit you if you're looking for something more vocational. Some of my friends who did Forensics degrees sweated buckets over their Biomolecules module. Be careful to check details of degree content when deciding. And it won't be anything like CSI!

    You can also find specialised degrees in Marketing or Advertising. Again, look for ones which will not only give you a degree, but also professional accreditation and the potential for membership of professional organisations. All of these will be good for your CV. Where possible, find ones which include a year's work placement. Although it means taking four years over your degree, you'll come out with professional experience on your CV which can be invaluable.
    Thanks for all the help! The undergrad journalism degree is something I will definitely look into especially because I know it's a fierce market. And Marketing and Advertising courses I will also look into as they do sound interesting! I think from both replies I will cancel out forensics as I'm not doing any scientific A level subjects and so think I would fall behind and struggle.

    Thanks a bunch!
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    (Original post by ucs132)
    Thanks for all the help! The undergrad journalism degree is something I will definitely look into especially because I know it's a fierce market. And Marketing and Advertising courses I will also look into as they do sound interesting! I think from both replies I will cancel out forensics as I'm not doing any scientific A level subjects and so think I would fall behind and struggle.

    Thanks a bunch!
    Just a heads up about journalism as I wanted to get in to that and to an extend still intend to (photojournalism however I still know about getting into other aspects also as I looked into it). You don't need a degree in journalism to become a journalist in the same way you don't need a finance degree to get into banking.

    Most journalists will tell you a journalism degree isn't needed and often they will tell you not to study it. Most journalists would study humanities subjects and gain work experience and other extracurriculars while at university to strengthen their CV. Personally, I would suggest something like English or History (or something related such as classics etc) basically anything that involves a lot of essays and great written English. While at university you will want to write for the university magazine and also look into anything else.

    Journalism isn't just about showing you can report, it is about showing you have something to report about. So whatever interests you be sure to show this also. For example, if it is conflict journalism you will want to be sure to demonstrate some form of activities while at university showing this, could be anything from joining a society to fundraising for refugees in a war stricken nation.

    Journalism is fiercely competitive. If you are lucky enough to get a job out of university expect it to be a boring local paper with low wages. If you want to cover the stuff you like right after or even during university, freelance is the way. In fact, Freelance will likely be the most probably route into the profession. So in that case, picking up photography as a hobby during university will be another smart move.
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    What do you think about entering in journalism with Communication and Media undergraduate course
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    What do you think about entering in journalism with Communication and Media undergraduate course 
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    (Original post by kami)
    What do you think about entering in journalism with Communication and Media undergraduate course
    You'll be competing with people who have specific Journalism degrees, and a Communication & Media degree will probably not include professional Journalism accreditations. Worth shopping around though - there might be some which cover what you need.

    Work experience is really the key to getting into professional journalism. Get involved in as much as possible at uni - student papers/magazines, any kind of radio or television work etc. Maybe try and find a course with a year's placement. It will all help you stand out to recruiters.
 
 
 
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