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    So i have two conditionals, both from Strathclyde. One to go study Electrical and Electronic Engineering and the other to go study Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. At first i thought it'd be EEE but i am now having second thoughts.

    Many of you may say "Go for the one you are most interested in", but the truth is that i really do not know which one i am interested in. What exactly would both courses consist of? I have a rough idea but i'd like some specificity. Am i right in saying that Electronic Engineering is mostly to do with circuit boards and data transmission? What exactly is Mechanical Engineering - Machinery? My dad has been telling me to go for the one that touches most on "Renewable Energy" as he feels that it will be a massive industry in the future, but which one does touch on the subject the most?

    My teacher told me that the Electronics industry up here in Scotland is not that big, but i don't know if that is 100% true. Which course is most broadest and most likely to get me a job? Which graduate would generally earn a higher salary? Which would be more interesting in your opinion, and why?

    Also, would both courses consist of everything the same in terms of the Electrical Engineering side of things? Just how much Electronic, Electrical, Mechanical Engineering would i do in each course? Is it split 50/50, 60/40, or do you tend to just go 100% Electical, Mechanical or Electronic?

    Thank you for your time, any advice or feedback is much appreciated.
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    (Original post by zRydo)
    So i have two conditionals, both from Strathclyde. One to go study Electrical and Electronic Engineering and the other to go study Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. At first i thought it'd be EEE but i am now having second thoughts.

    Many of you may say "Go for the one you are most interested in", but the truth is that i really do not know which one i am interested in. What exactly would both courses consist of? I have a rough idea but i'd like some specificity. Am i right in saying that Electronic Engineering is mostly to do with circuit boards and data transmission? What exactly is Mechanical Engineering - Machinery? My dad has been telling me to go for the one that touches most on "Renewable Energy" as he feels that it will be a massive industry in the future, but which one does touch on the subject the most?

    My teacher told me that the Electronics industry up here in Scotland is not that big, but i don't know if that is 100% true. Which course is most broadest and most likely to get me a job? Which graduate would generally earn a higher salary? Which would be more interesting in your opinion, and why?

    Also, would both courses consist of everything the same in terms of the Electrical Engineering side of things? Just how much Electronic, Electrical, Mechanical Engineering would i do in each course? Is it split 50/50, 60/40, or do you tend to just go 100% Electical, Mechanical or Electronic?

    Thank you for your time, any advice or feedback is much appreciated.
    Hi, 3rd year EEE student at Strathclyde here

    The first year course for EEE and EME are the same except for two classes.
    While EEE do programming, EME do "heat & flow" and while EEE do physics, EME do mechanics.
    Several people in my year switched between EME and EEE during first year, so if you pick one and change your mind you should be able to swap provided you're not failing all your classes.

    In the later years the degrees become more different.

    The EEE degree is pretty much split 50/50 electronic and electrical for the first two years, and then in 3rd year you start to make choices and can choose which side of things to focus on.
    The EME degree is less electronic, with much less emphasis on programming, and more on power and energy generation.

    The employability for both courses is equal, and the opportunities for scholarships, summer placements and graduate jobs are open to everyone.

    At Strathclyde there are a lot of links to power and energy companies so if that's what you want to go into, provided you're hard working you shouldn't have much of a problem getting placements/jobs.

    If you're interested in other areas there are also lots of opportunities, and loads of people to help you with applications/references.


    If you have any more questions I'm happy to answer them
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    (Original post by Popppppy)
    Hi, 3rd year EEE student at Strathclyde here

    The first year course for EEE and EME are the same except for two classes.
    While EEE do programming, EME do "heat & flow" and while EEE do physics, EME do mechanics.
    Several people in my year switched between EME and EEE during first year, so if you pick one and change your mind you should be able to swap provided you're not failing all your classes.

    In the later years the degrees become more different.

    The EEE degree is pretty much split 50/50 electronic and electrical for the first two years, and then in 3rd year you start to make choices and can choose which side of things to focus on.
    The EME degree is less electronic, with much less emphasis on programming, and more on power and energy generation.

    The employability for both courses is equal, and the opportunities for scholarships, summer placements and graduate jobs are open to everyone.

    At Strathclyde there are a lot of links to power and energy companies so if that's what you want to go into, provided you're hard working you shouldn't have much of a problem getting placements/jobs.

    If you're interested in other areas there are also lots of opportunities, and loads of people to help you with applications/references.


    If you have any more questions I'm happy to answer them

    Hey I'm 3rd year EME,

    I agree mostly with what has been said - it is relatively straight forward to move from EEE to EME etc.

    Only thing I would say (entirely my own opinion) is that while the opportunities for scholarships are the same, overwhelmingly, more scholarships go to EME than EEE. This is because of the interdisciplinary nature of the course - it's very broad and employers like that. Just now, I reckon about 80% of folk on EME have a scholarship of some sort, which is higher than EEE. Also for going abroad, EME have more options as you can go to universities that have a link with Mechanical as well.

    There is much less coding involved in EME, and more focus on integrated systems as there are very few things that are purely electrical or purely mechanical e.g. a car, power station.

    Basically, either way you are going to a good place. It just depends where you want to end up

    Any questions, let me know!
 
 
 
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