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    This isn't as controversial as it first sounds.

    The idea behind such a move is to give the owners a financial incentive to breed the animal in question until they're no longer endangered.

    Let's say people developed a taste for panda steak for example, if we privatised the panda and allowed farmers to trade panda meat they'd soon become as common as chicken, cows or sheep, i.e animals we keep as livestock in their millions.

    This could work with any animal if we allowed the market to work it's magic.

    This isn't my idea btw, it's something Dan Hannan MEP first suggested a few months ago:

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    Not sure about this one, what if the demand for the product out weighs the rate at which the animals can reproduce, like for example if the new craze of panda fur or meat spread so quickly that the pandas couldn't possibly keep up. Wouldn't this put their species in more danger??
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    (Original post by chefdave)
    This isn't as controversial as it first sounds.

    The idea behind such a move is to give the owners a financial incentive to breed the animal in question until they're no longer endangered.

    Let's say people developed a taste for panda steak for example, if we privatised the panda and allowed farmers to trade panda meat they'd soon become as common as chicken, cows or sheep, i.e animals we keep as livestock in their millions.

    This could work with any animal if we allowed the market to work it's magic.

    This isn't my idea btw, it's something Dan Hannan MEP first suggested a few months ago:

    Except it's sort of missing the point, entirely.

    We don't want to keep endangered species alive just for the sake of them being alive. We wish to keep the alive to preserve the nature ecosystems from within which they come. The extinction of one animal within an ecosystem, for whatever reason, could have dramatic effects on the ecosystem as a whole.

    Taking an animal, sticking it in a farm and then keeping them as livestock hardly solves that issue. Yeah sure, the animal isn't extinct, but it's hardly better off, neither is the ecosystem and its just become as mundane as a cow.
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    This is what happens when man intervenes with nature. He only ever destroys.
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    (Original post by doggylover)
    Not sure about this one, what if the demand for the product out weighs the rate at which the animals can reproduce, like for example if the new craze of panda fur or meat spread so quickly that the pandas couldn't possibly keep up. Wouldn't this put their species in more danger??
    No, because the price would go up which would reduce quantity demanded.
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    Didn't Jeremy Clarkson propose this in one of his Times columns?

    And to be honest, I'm not sure it'd work too well, at least in the case of pandas where the issue is that they're incredibly difficult to breed. If vets and zoologists with years of experience and grounding in the newest techniques can't solve the problem, I don't think throwing more money at the problem will really make much of a difference.

    With species that are being hunted to extinction/losing habitat, etc, I guess it could work. It'd be difficult to find enough of a financial incentive to get backers on board though. I'm not sure the encouraging people to eat it would work - financial backers won't get on board until the demand is high enough, and that won't be the case until people have tried orang-utan and liked it, so you basically have to eat (literally) into the existing population of an already rare animal for the mere possibility of backing. If you kill half the world's orang-utans to encourage people to eat them, and then it turns out that it's not that nice to eat, all you're left with are half as many orang-utans as you started with.
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    But how would 'conservationists' bribe soldiers to essentially steal parts of Africa if someone came up with a common sense idea to preserve animals that differed to theirs?
 
 
 
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