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    An astronaut weighs 134N while she is training on the moon. On the moon, g=1.61nkg^-1
    Calculate her mass...

    Now I thought that is g=f/m
    Then m = fg but my answer is wrong. Could somebody please explain. The answer says 83.2kg


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    Mass=weight/gravitational field strength
    So it's 134/1.61

    You basically need to rearrange the equation weight=mass*gravitational field strength.
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    (Original post by Pilot96)
    An astronaut weighs 134N while she is training on the moon. On the moon, g=1.61nkg^-1
    Calculate her mass...

    Now I thought that is g=f/m
    Then m = fg but my answer is wrong. Could somebody please explain. The answer says 83.2kg


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    You've just rearranged the formula wrong:

    F=ma
    Therefore for gravity,
    F=mg
    So,
    m=F/g

    :top:

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    Well... Start with standard equations and build up.

    F=ma (but we know the acceleration there is 1.61, or just "g")
    F=mg
    To find the mass, we need to get rid of "g" from the right hand side. To do that, divide through by "g"
    F/g = m

    Substitute the values.
 
 
 
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