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Dentist Anesthetic, is it given through a needle or is it like, in a cup like drink? Watch

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    I have to go to the dentist today at I think 4:15 pm to have one of my back tooth out, although I'm not in constant pain with it, it does hurt at times and always when I eat or drink on that side, especially hot or really cold food and drink.
    Because it isn't a constant pain I have ignored it for the past few weeks but I am finding it a nuisance now and getting fed up of having to be careful every time I eat or drink.

    So back to topic, I have an appointment this afternoon and I was just wondering if I'll be given anesthetic or if I'll have to ask for it, also is anesthetic administered through a needle or is it more like a drink in a cup? what does it taste like????
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    Dentist said on check up, it is very decayed, you can either have a filling or tooth extraction, I opted for tooth out as fillings can be so unreliable, also because it is such a big hole it seems best to have the tooth removed imo
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    I believe you inhale it through a mask you place over your mouth and nose.
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    I imagine it would be a needle. It would be local, can you even deliver that in a drink?
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    Local anthesthetics are given through needels, I worked at a dentist for my work expereience. The numbness after can last up to 8 hours. If it is one of your top teeth then 1 injection will be needed into your upper gums, if it is one of your bottom teeth 2 injections will be needed at the side of the tooth on your lower gums. These needels feel no more than a little pinch and dont hurt at all
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    I've had two teeth out, and my dentist put some numbing stuff on my gums, then there were 2 injections, front and back. Stung a bit but it wasn't too bad the actual extraction didn't hurt at all, just felt weird. Good luck!

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    Also, I had to have 6 injections when I chipped my two front teeth, its just the numbness after that causes a weird sensation. I chipped them through my nerves and now can't eat extremly cold foods, or hard foods, such as ice cream or toffie. If you do get nervous at all PM me :borat:
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    Needles and despite a fair few saying they didn't hurt, they were very painful for me. I don't know if that's because some seem to mention a gel being put on their gum before the needle is used, where as I just had injections straight away. I wouldn't say I have a low pain threshold, but those needles in the roof of your mouth are not nice...
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    (Original post by Stressed Eric)
    I have to go to the dentist today at I think 4:15 pm to have one of my back tooth out, although I'm not in constant pain with it, it does hurt at times and always when I eat or drink on that side, especially hot or really cold food and drink.
    Because it isn't a constant pain I have ignored it for the past few weeks but I am finding it a nuisance now and getting fed up of having to be careful every time I eat or drink.

    So back to topic, I have an appointment this afternoon and I was just wondering if I'll be given anesthetic or if I'll have to ask for it, also is anesthetic administered through a needle or is it more like a drink in a cup? what does it taste like????
    If it's a wisdom tooth, which it sounds like, then you'll need quite a bit of numbing up. Not to scare you, but a wisdom tooth extraction often involves a scalpel and sometimes stitches.

    It definitely won't be in a cup.

    Dentists used to occasionally use general anaesthetic (gas over your mouth) but they aren't allowed to anymore. Only if you were having this tooth taken out at a hospital, would you be put 'to sleep.'

    The anaesthetic will be in the form of a needle. A good dentist will numb the site of injection with cream/gel first so you won't feel the needle, but this takes 4-7 minutes so many NHS dentists who are on a tight schedule seem to miss this step out or not complete it fully. I've only ever had jags for fillings on my baby teeth, but they never bothered me that much and I was 7 years old, so you'll be fine! The best thing to do is to close your eyes whilst they're preparing the needle and injecting you, it takes away a large part of the fear as you don't see a giant needle coming swooping towards you. After that, you'll probably be sent to the waiting room to allow the anaesthetic to kick in. Then you'll be called back into the treatment room and the dentist will begin the extraction. Don't worry - you shouldn't and won't feel anything at this stage, as one side of your face will be completely numb.
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    I was injected directly into my mouth around my gums or somewhere ... it was years ago - I can't remember for sure.
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    (Original post by AspiringMedic8)
    If it's a wisdom tooth, which it sounds like, then you'll need quite a bit of numbing up. Not to scare you, but a wisdom tooth extraction often involves a scalpel and sometimes stitches.

    It definitely won't be in a cup.

    Dentists used to occasionally use general anaesthetic (gas over your mouth) but they aren't allowed to anymore. Only if you were having this tooth taken out at a hospital, would you be put 'to sleep.'

    The anaesthetic will be in the form of a needle. A good dentist will numb the site of injection with cream/gel first so you won't feel the needle, but this takes 4-7 minutes so many NHS dentists who are on a tight schedule seem to miss this step out or not complete it fully. I've only ever had jags for fillings on my baby teeth, but they never bothered me that much and I was 7 years old, so you'll be fine! The best thing to do is to close your eyes whilst they're preparing the needle and injecting you, it takes away a large part of the fear as you don't see a giant needle coming swooping towards you. After that, you'll probably be sent to the waiting room to allow the anaesthetic to kick in. Then you'll be called back into the treatment room and the dentist will begin the extraction. Don't worry - you shouldn't and won't feel anything at this stage, as one side of your face will be completely numb.

    Thanks for your advice and as good as it is, I have to say, I feel its made my anxiety worse. I have the appointment in 45 minutes so will have to leave home in 30 minutes, now I am really freaking out and worried
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    Needles deep into your gums and the roof of your mouth.

    Have fun
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    (Original post by Mockery)
    Needles deep into your gums and the roof of your mouth.

    Have fun

    out of a 10 if any, how painful after anesthetic?
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    why will I have fun? :confused:
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    I said yesterday to not think about it, its not that big of a deal
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    (Original post by Stressed Eric)
    out of a 10 if any, how painful after anesthetic?
    Zero
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    (Original post by Nick1sHere)
    I said yesterday to not think about it, its not that big of a deal

    I'm leaving home anytime now, have to be there at 4:15pm, I just can't stop stressing out over it

    Thanks for your advice yesterday, will let you know how I get on
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    The needle hurts, but only for a little bit, it hurts deeper in the gum than going in. Looking away and not seeing the needle is the best bet, then it's just feeling the movement and digging and drilling which is a weird feeling, but not painful at all. I had a back tooth removed because of an infected abscess and I can't say it was anything to worry about. I didn't feel any pain.

    I was scared of root canals though, however until last year and they're like a filling but takes longer. Got to have one again in the next few weeks.

    When I had fillings years ago, I used to have to have two injections because the first wouldn't numb me so I would feel pain shortly after starting, but they must have improved the injections because one is more than enough.
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    (Original post by Mutedmirth)
    The needle hurts, but only for a little bit, it hurts deeper in the gum than going in. Looking away and not seeing the needle is the best bet, then it's just feeling the movement and digging and drilling which is a weird feeling, but not painful at all. I had a back tooth removed because of an infected abscess and I can't say it was anything to worry about. I didn't feel any pain.

    I was scared of root canals though, however until last year and they're like a filling but takes longer. Got to have one again in the next few weeks.

    When I had fillings years ago, wouldI used to have to have two injections because the first wouldn't numb me so I would feel pain shortly after starting, but they must have improved the injections because one is more than enough.



    I had my tooth out today and despite 2 anesthetic needles the pain was terrible, I told the dentist I was still in pain but he didn't give me any more anesthetic, he asked me throughout if I was okay to proceed , I was in terrible pain but i wanted it over so I agreed
 
 
 
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