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    Hello everyone!
    I would like to know, how to become a neurosurgeon and the steps to take.
    I am currently studying level 3 BTEC applied science and it won't get me onto a medicine degree, so I was going to complete a biochemistry degree and then complete a medicine degree. The question I would like to know is, once I have got my medicine degree what do I do next ?

    Many thanks for all answers


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    You'll probably get better answers here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=195
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    After your FY1 and FY2 years- this
    http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advic...ml?id=20000117
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    What is fy?
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    (Original post by Brentton)
    What is fy?
    FY stands for Foundation Year. After you graduate from medical school, you have to do two years (FY1 and FY2) as a junior doctor - during this time you work a combination of medical and surgical jobs, and at the end of this two year period you apply for specialty training.

    The BMJ careers link has lots of great information.

    You'll want to keep in mind that neurosurgery is a very competitive specialty to gain a post in. In 2012, there were 254 applications for 16 training posts. So you'll have to work very hard to get there.

    I wouldn't count out other specialties yet; you're over 3 years from even getting to medical school. There may be a great deal of specialties that you'll enjoy!

    (Original post by Porkchop)
    Med school, 6 years. You're a doctor.
    Residency, 4 years. You're a surgeon.
    Specialist neurosurgeon training, 2-3 years. You're a neurosurgeon.
    We don't have "residency" in the UK. As outlined above, you're a junior doctor for 2 years post graduation from med school (5 or 6 years). Then you apply for specialty training - which is 8 years for neurosurgery.
    Lots of information here.

    Question to anyone who happens on this that might know better: is the FY -> CST -> ST route an option for neurosurgery? Or is it run-through only?
    I'd imagine it varies by deanery, but I don't really have a clue.
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    Thank you for your answers ! It's much appreciated! Do you think it would be a waste of time considering I will be completing a biochemistry degree before hand? It would take up to 20 years to eventually get there! I will need a job a lot earlier than that! I will be in my 40s and I do want to have children a lot younger than that but won't have a job. So do you think it would be a complete waste of time?


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Thank you for your answers ! It's much appreciated! Do you think it would be a waste of time considering I will be completing a biochemistry degree before hand? It would take up to 20 years to eventually get there! I will need a job a lot earlier than that! I will be in my 40s and I do want to have children a lot younger than that but won't have a job. So do you think it would be a complete waste of time?
    You have a job before that! When people say training, they mean on the job training, so after medical school, you'd be a doctor with certain levels of responsibility, always training to reach a higher grade. If you think of a consultant neurosurgeon as being a general in the army, it's not like you stay in army school for 20 years, and then get made a general, you start off as a junior and prove yourself to get promoted. So it is becoming a consultant.

    If I were you, I'd try and complete a 5 year medical degree without getting a degree in biochemistry beforehand. Graduate entry medicine (GEM) is notoriously hard to get in to (worse than medicine for school leavers) so you might want to consider doing a foundation year or A-levels to get onto the degree.
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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Thank you for your answers ! It's much appreciated! Do you think it would be a waste of time considering I will be completing a biochemistry degree before hand? It would take up to 20 years to eventually get there! I will need a job a lot earlier than that! I will be in my 40s and I do want to have children a lot younger than that but won't have a job. So do you think it would be a complete waste of time?


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    It wouldn't be a waste of time, because it's a stepping stone to the medical degree, which is essential to become any type of qualified doctor.

    You will have a job, you'll be getting paid whilst training. It's not an amazing oh-my-god-get-me-a-ferrari salary, but it will do plenty in keeping you and your family alive!

    Nothing is a waste of time if you gain something from it.
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    I'm already on my first year or BTEC! My school messed me up and put me in foundation by accident so I only got Cs in science GCSE so nowhere allowed me to study a-levels so by the time I finish I will 19 because they kept me behind a year (long story) so if I study a levels I will 21 when I go to med school! Is it worth it?


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    Oh I see what you mean, do you know the average salary for a training doctor?


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Hello everyone!
    I would like to know, how to become a neurosurgeon and the steps to take.
    I am currently studying level 3 BTEC applied science and it won't get me onto a medicine degree, so I was going to complete a biochemistry degree and then complete a medicine degree. The question I would like to know is, once I have got my medicine degree what do I do next ?

    Many thanks for all answers


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    Can you even do biochemistry with a BTEC in applied science? It would have to be a bad uni or am I just ignorant:confused:
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    Yeah, there are a few universities in London that I can study biochemistry e.g Kingston, Westminster, uel, Hertfordshire allow it. So some bad, some fairly average but that doesn't matter because if I achieve at least a 2:1 I can go to a great med school :P


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    I'm already on my first year or BTEC! My school messed me up and put me in foundation by accident so I only got Cs in science GCSE so nowhere allowed me to study a-levels so by the time I finish I will 19 because they kept me behind a year (long story) so if I study a levels I will 21 when I go to med school! Is it worth it?
    You definitely have a long road ahead of you. Graduate-Entry Medicine (remember you still have that as an option) is even more competitive than the standard A100 course. You've got competition all the way until you finish your training and gain a consultancy spot; it's hard work, and you need to be prepared to put that work in.

    Regarding the route you're currently planning; it's very uncommon for someone to do that. You'll have to get in contact with the medical schools to see whether they'll consider your application.
    Also keep in mind that a lot of medical schools have strict GCSE requirements, so even with the A-levels, you might not qualify. And even if you do qualify, you'll be at a disadvantage compared to other applicants who've excelled in their GCSEs and finished A levels right after. Like I said, it'll be hard, and you're going to have to work extremely hard to make up for it elsewhere in your application!

    If this is what you want to do, bro, then of course it's worth it. The only way you can get a career in medicine is by studying medicine at university; surely that makes it worth it?
    We have plenty of medics who've entered med school in their late 20s and 30s on here, and they're loving it - I know people with degrees, with PhDs, with husbands and children who're only in their first year of med school but love it. Don't be put off by the time if it's really what you want to do.
    Similarly, we have people who've gone in after 18, hated it, and dropped out. Or are hating it but suffering through. You have to be SURE it's what you want to do to make this long route worth it. For that, the best thing to do is get some volunteering and work experience under your belt to get a rough idea of what medicine is really like, and even then, it's no guarantee that you'll like the reality.

    (Original post by Brentton)
    Oh I see what you mean, do you know the average salary for a training doctor?
    Your first year as a doctor, the basic salary, I think is currently ~£22.4k (you also get banded paying, explained in the following link). It increases as you progress through foundation and specialty training. Information here.
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    I have work experience lined up next month in my local hospital! I can't wait to do it! I really want to study medicine because I want to help people in the world, save life's. I have been told by a lecturer that if I graduate in biochemistry with a 1st or 2:1 I can get on to post graduate entry medicine because in medicine, biochemistry is the units most people struggle with so if I can prove myself in the hardest units it gives me an advantage. They were words from an actual lecturer who came in to my college and spoke, so I had a 1to1 conversation with him. He told me to never give up and there will always be a way for me to get into med school.


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    Is there more competition for neurosurgery or cosmetic surgery?


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    i think that your best option would be to finish your btec first and then when you´re 19 you should apply for a H.E access to Medicine & Medical Bio Sciences which will lead you straight to medicine instead of doing the biochemistry degree, the access course is just 1 year but you will have to work really hard .

    best of luck
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    (Original post by josephlk69)
    i think that your best option would be to finish your btec first and then when you´re 19 you should apply for a H.E access to Medicine & Medical Bio Sciences which will lead you straight to medicine instead of doing the biochemistry degree, the access course is just 1 year but you will have to work really hard .

    best of luck
    Do these courses have any requirment in terms of A-levels or BTECs. Because i really want to get into (MBBS) but i dont have any science subjects eg Biology or chemistry. But have a combination of BTEC Medical Science and Two A-levels which are
    Psychology and Business Studies.
 
 
 
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