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    Hey need some advice. I'm leaving my law degree to go back to college and do an Access to Science course. I hate my course, my uni, etc just the uni experience has been a nightmare from start to finish. I'm near the end of my second year but I don't intend to take the exams.

    Firstly, I was going to wait to 'quit' until I've got my next lot of loan. Simply because I need the money for my rent, otherwise I literally can't pay it. I also received a grant though - will I be required to pay this back straight away? As I don't have the money to do so :/

    I've got an interview at college (but have told this basically means I'm accepted) to do Access to Science. I will work full time over the summer and pay for it myself. I then want to go to uni again to study Nutrition and Dietetics. I have AAB in non-science A levels, and I got ABB in chemistry, biology and physics GCSEs. Also A in maths. Will the Bs put Kings off me when I apply? I'm sure if I apply myself I can do well on this course, especially as I am used to doing 20+ hours of study a week privately at university. Also, as I've used up two years student finance can I still go to uni? The course is free as it's paid for by the NHS and is not means-tested, plus the bursary for living costs, but as I've been to uni before is there any particular rule stating that I can't receive this finance or anything? I will hopefully go to Kings or Surrey and can therefore live at home, and I intend to work full time over the summer then maintain a part time job as long as is feasible when I go to a new uni.

    Basically I guess I'm just wondering whether already going to uni will mean I can't follow through my intended path. I am a hard worker but have lacked focus in the past as I didn't know what to do with my life and rushed into law. However, I am 100% sure this is what I want to do and I am not a flighty person. Once I make a decision I usually stick it out, but studying law is making me miserable and there is no career out of it that I wish to pursue. I want to work in a hospital/clinic and help people be healthier, lose weight or where people have things like cancer and need to be advised on what food can help them improve their recovery chances. I am currently working in a gym and speaking to the nutritionists there I know I would love the job. I am just worried that by going to uni first to do law, I have ruined my chances. I am willing to work extremely hard and make sure I get as many distinctions in my Access course as possible.

    Finally - on the UCAS, do I include my year at university?

    Thank you in advance, I don't know anyone who has done an Access course and while I'm very excited, I am also nervous obviously about dropping out of uni. I am 20 now and will be 22 by the time I start my next uni course and it's a bit nerve-wracking leaving a RG uni and going back to college. I know I'm making the right decision though, but would still appreciate any advice
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    With the finance, it doesn't work the way you think. Unless you can claim mitigating circumstances they will want the money back, so waiting for the next installment is a bit redundant; though I can appreciate you need it for rent. Anything available to you from SFE you most likely won't get in your first two years because you have already used 2 years funding. I had my loan written off because I was too sick to continue university after having an awful experience in accommodation so I still have my full funding available. But it doesn't work like that if you quit. Sorry if you didn't know this and it's a shock and sorry if you did know this and I'm repeating things you've already been told!
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    Hey need some advice. I'm leaving my law degree to go back to college and do an Access to Science course. I hate my course, my uni, etc just the uni experience has been a nightmare from start to finish. I'm near the end of my second year but I don't intend to take the exams.

    Firstly, I was going to wait to 'quit' until I've got my next lot of loan. Simply because I need the money for my rent, otherwise I literally can't pay it. I also received a grant though - will I be required to pay this back straight away? As I don't have the money to do so :/

    I've got an interview at college (but have told this basically means I'm accepted) to do Access to Science. I will work full time over the summer and pay for it myself. I then want to go to uni again to study Nutrition and Dietetics. I have AAB in non-science A levels, and I got ABB in chemistry, biology and physics GCSEs. Also A in maths. Will the Bs put Kings off me when I apply? I'm sure if I apply myself I can do well on this course, especially as I am used to doing 20+ hours of study a week privately at university. Also, as I've used up two years student finance can I still go to uni? The course is free as it's paid for by the NHS and is not means-tested, plus the bursary for living costs, but as I've been to uni before is there any particular rule stating that I can't receive this finance or anything? I will hopefully go to Kings or Surrey and can therefore live at home, and I intend to work full time over the summer then maintain a part time job as long as is feasible when I go to a new uni.

    Basically I guess I'm just wondering whether already going to uni will mean I can't follow through my intended path. I am a hard worker but have lacked focus in the past as I didn't know what to do with my life and rushed into law. However, I am 100% sure this is what I want to do and I am not a flighty person. Once I make a decision I usually stick it out, but studying law is making me miserable and there is no career out of it that I wish to pursue. I want to work in a hospital/clinic and help people be healthier, lose weight or where people have things like cancer and need to be advised on what food can help them improve their recovery chances. I am currently working in a gym and speaking to the nutritionists there I know I would love the job. I am just worried that by going to uni first to do law, I have ruined my chances. I am willing to work extremely hard and make sure I get as many distinctions in my Access course as possible.

    Finally - on the UCAS, do I include my year at university?

    Thank you in advance, I don't know anyone who has done an Access course and while I'm very excited, I am also nervous obviously about dropping out of uni. I am 20 now and will be 22 by the time I start my next uni course and it's a bit nerve-wracking leaving a RG uni and going back to college. I know I'm making the right decision though, but would still appreciate any advice
    I believe that, as your new course will be funded by the NHS, you'll get fee's covered and an NHS bursary from them. I don't know if you'd get a subsided maintenance loan in your first year - though you'd definitely get it for the 2nd and 3rd years.

    I don't really know how it works with someone who has A Levels, and an Access Course. I believe the B wouldn't be an issue if you got Distinctions in all your Access units. You could do an A Level in a Science subject if you wanted to, instead of doing an Access course (it'd be cheaper). Exams are next month so, if you wanted to, you could find the theoretical ones and study for them now.... and sit those exams in May... and then do the rest next year before going to Uni. It's a bit intensive, but it'll show King's that you want to do this. Working in a gym will help you with your new career goals as well, make sure you write about it in your PS.

    For your grades in UCAS you have to put ALL education since secondary school. So, all A Levels, and your current Uni course needs to go on there.

    If you leave uni now, and go back next year, you won't have to pay any student finance back straight away.
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    I believe that, as your new course will be funded by the NHS, you'll get fee's covered and an NHS bursary from them. I don't know if you'd get a subsided maintenance loan in your first year - though you'd definitely get it for the 2nd and 3rd years.

    I don't really know how it works with someone who has A Levels, and an Access Course. I believe the B wouldn't be an issue if you got Distinctions in all your Access units. You could do an A Level in a Science subject if you wanted to, instead of doing an Access course (it'd be cheaper). Exams are next month so, if you wanted to, you could find the theoretical ones and study for them now.... and sit those exams in May... and then do the rest next year before going to Uni. It's a bit intensive, but it'll show King's that you want to do this. Working in a gym will help you with your new career goals as well, make sure you write about it in your PS.

    For your grades in UCAS you have to put ALL education since secondary school. So, all A Levels, and your current Uni course needs to go on there.

    If you leave uni now, and go back next year, you won't have to pay any student finance back straight away.
    I am debating doing the A levels but am a bit wary about teaching myself science which I haven't done since GCSE! I'm happy to work really hard but I'm just not sure I'd be able to get the As/Bs I would need. The offer for King's is AAB with chemistry/biology but it doesn't stipulate whether the As have to be chemistry/biology, simply that you do need those two subjects. I could possibly manage an A in chem and a B in bio, but I'm not sure at this stage obviously. I would hope that in that case my offer would be AA or AB then? As I do already have AAB in philosophy and ethics, classical civilisation and english language and literature respectively. Would it be possible to get these grades with the use of something like CGP and as many past papers as possible, do you know? And thank you, that's a relief about the finance. I really need it to pay the rent of my contract.

    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    With the finance, it doesn't work the way you think. Unless you can claim mitigating circumstances they will want the money back, so waiting for the next installment is a bit redundant; though I can appreciate you need it for rent. Anything available to you from SFE you most likely won't get in your first two years because you have already used 2 years funding. I had my loan written off because I was too sick to continue university after having an awful experience in accommodation so I still have my full funding available. But it doesn't work like that if you quit. Sorry if you didn't know this and it's a shock and sorry if you did know this and I'm repeating things you've already been told!
    I know I will have to pay it back eventually, e.g. when I'm earning over 15k or whatever it is but I meant will I have to pay it back straight away? I will need it to pay the rent of my contract :/ which I won't be able to get out of at this stage, it's until September and I've already asked the landlord many times if I could be released and they've said no. I'm happy to work and fund my own maintenance as I'm planning on living at home anyway for the next degree but I was just wondering whether the fact I've received SF at all means I wouldn't be allowed the NHS stuff. Thank you I appreciate any advice either way
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    I am debating doing the A levels but am a bit wary about teaching myself science which I haven't done since GCSE! I'm happy to work really hard but I'm just not sure I'd be able to get the As/Bs I would need. The offer for King's is AAB with chemistry/biology but it doesn't stipulate whether the As have to be chemistry/biology, simply that you do need those two subjects. I could possibly manage an A in chem and a B in bio, but I'm not sure at this stage obviously. I would hope that in that case my offer would be AA or AB then? As I do already have AAB in philosophy and ethics, classical civilisation and english language and literature respectively. Would it be possible to get these grades with the use of something like CGP and as many past papers as possible, do you know? And thank you, that's a relief about the finance. I really need it to pay the rent of my contract.



    I know I will have to pay it back eventually, e.g. when I'm earning over 15k or whatever it is but I meant will I have to pay it back straight away? I will need it to pay the rent of my contract :/ which I won't be able to get out of at this stage, it's until September and I've already asked the landlord many times if I could be released and they've said no. I'm happy to work and fund my own maintenance as I'm planning on living at home anyway for the next degree but I was just wondering whether the fact I've received SF at all means I wouldn't be allowed the NHS stuff. Thank you I appreciate any advice either way

    I believe that NHS funded courses are exempt from the student finance equivalent rules. So you should get full funding for the new course.

    For your funding for this year, if you leave early you won't pay it back until you're earning £15k+. You don't have HAVE to tell SFE you're leaving uni either. I left uni this year and haven't had to pay anything back yet, even though I'm in a full time job. I'm going back to uni in Sept though to finish my law degree!
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    I believe that NHS funded courses are exempt from the student finance equivalent rules. So you should get full funding for the new course.

    For your funding for this year, if you leave early you won't pay it back until you're earning £15k+. You don't have HAVE to tell SFE you're leaving uni either. I left uni this year and haven't had to pay anything back yet, even though I'm in a full time job. I'm going back to uni in Sept though to finish my law degree!
    Ah fantastic thank you! Haha ironic, I am leaving my law degree best of luck though. I just looked about A levels online but the chemistry/biology ones both have coursework, I don't think I could do experiments etc at home really. I'd like to be taught science as well as I haven't done any for so long, I think I'll opt for the Access course. I will also be a mature student by the time I start again and from what I've read it seems I may get a slightly more lenient offer for an Access course? I'm going to aim for all Distinctions anyway after doing 2 years of law, to go back an academic step I want to just get my head down and make sure I do really well!
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    !

    Sorry to quote you again! But I was just wondering, when I did my A levels I got an E in my Psychology AS (was planning on dropping it anyway, didn't need it even for my UCL offer etc etc) and I'm now thinking I could easily take the two psychology exams in june. I've looked at some past papers and also the CGP book I still have, which is still relevant for the current spec. Do you think if I did psychology AS and then the A2 next year, that would help me prove a commitment to science? I will be applying to King's obviously in the coming academic year and as I only got ABB in my science GCSEs would taking psychology show an aptitude for science? There is a local adult college which offers the A2 in an evening class once a week - my Access course is only 3 days a week so I could easily fit this all in, it's still less than the work I'd be doing at uni. If these wre the only exams I'm taking in June I'm sure I could do really well in them, plus 1.5 hour exams are nothing compared to 3.5 hour law ones! So then when I applied to King's I'd already have a psychology AS level to show I'm serious about science, and be doing the A2/Access course. Do you know how to enter as a private candidate? I've found a centre nearby which takes the Psych course so presumably I need to contact AQA and the centre?
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    (Original post by infairverona)

    I know I will have to pay it back eventually, e.g. when I'm earning over 15k or whatever it is but I meant will I have to pay it back straight away? I will need it to pay the rent of my contract :/ which I won't be able to get out of at this stage, it's until September and I've already asked the landlord many times if I could be released and they've said no. I'm happy to work and fund my own maintenance as I'm planning on living at home anyway for the next degree but I was just wondering whether the fact I've received SF at all means I wouldn't be allowed the NHS stuff. Thank you I appreciate any advice either way
    I was quite tired last night and knew what I wanted to write, but it hasn't come across very well!

    The loan aspect of SF you will not have to re-pay until you earn over the threshold, but the grants you will HAVE to pay back ASAP. The grants are written off at the end of your degree as an investment because in theory you'll pay more tax in your life than the grant investment. But if you don't finish your degree then they will want the grant money back. If the money leaves your account immediately for vital living expenses then there's little they can do, but they will still expect you to repay it in full or in instalments as soon as you're able. As they pay you at the beginning of term then they will be paying you for something you will not be completing, and as far as SFE are concerned if you're no longer at uni then you don't need the money, so they will claim it back. It would be best to try to talk to SFE or a finance person at your uni to have all this clarified though. I hope this makes sense...

    On the A-levels front you can't sit practical exams at home you have to go to a school/college to have them invigilated like an exam, so you cannot do a science A-level purely on your own any more. The psychology is a difficult one, find out if Kings have a recommended A-level page. Many of those types of unis still don't consider psychology a science and consider it a second or third rate A-level, so putting yourself out this year to do the A-level may make no difference at all. It would be best to ask them, they may think that the psychology A-level is better than no A-level. Buy the exam board recommended books rather than CGP ones. Also I believe the deadline for private candidates has passed (though I could easily be wrong), talk to your local schools/colleges to see if they'll let you sit it as they have to enter you they will know the details.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    I was quite tired last night and knew what I wanted to write, but it hasn't come across very well!

    The loan aspect of SF you will not have to re-pay until you earn over the threshold, but the grants you will HAVE to pay back ASAP. The grants are written off at the end of your degree as an investment because in theory you'll pay more tax in your life than the grant investment. But if you don't finish your degree then they will want the grant money back. If the money leaves your account immediately for vital living expenses then there's little they can do, but they will still expect you to repay it in full or in instalments as soon as you're able. As they pay you at the beginning of term then they will be paying you for something you will not be completing, and as far as SFE are concerned if you're no longer at uni then you don't need the money, so they will claim it back. It would be best to try to talk to SFE or a finance person at your uni to have all this clarified though. I hope this makes sense...

    On the A-levels front you can't sit practical exams at home you have to go to a school/college to have them invigilated like an exam, so you cannot do a science A-level purely on your own any more. The psychology is a difficult one, find out if Kings have a recommended A-level page. Many of those types of unis still don't consider psychology a science and consider it a second or third rate A-level, so putting yourself out this year to do the A-level may make no difference at all. It would be best to ask them, they may think that the psychology A-level is better than no A-level. Buy the exam board recommended books rather than CGP ones. Also I believe the deadline for private candidates has passed (though I could easily be wrong), talk to your local schools/colleges to see if they'll let you sit it as they have to enter you they will know the details.

    Some of my SFE is grant and I also get a grant from university, but obviously I won't have the money to pay this back :/ would it be better then to stay 'at uni' until the end of the year then just fail the exams or something? I would pay it back in instalments if I can but I have to pay rent still and also some money at home to my mum :/ I thik I'll attempt the exams then because if I pass them even with a third I'd get a Diploma in HE? Is that right? Which is better than just the Certificate. I could do that if it means I won't have to pay it all back, then just choose to leave after I've passed them?

    Psychology won't count, they want AAB including Chem and Bio. But if I'm doing the Access course I won't need to do those A levels, what I meant was the redo those exams for Psychology AS in June so that at least when I apply to King's this autumn I will have some evidence of learning some kind of science before I've started my Access course. I thought that'd be better than leaving my law degree and then trying to claim I'm good at science, etc.
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    That's the thing. They will expect you to pay grants back if you're not at uni for when the grant is paid for, same with university grants. Like I said you'd have to talk to SFE and the uni about it because I can't tell you how they'd handle your situation, just the general rules. My uni and SFE threatened that I'd have to pay back all my grants, but because of my mitigating circumstances they were written off, but if you just leave then that won't be the case.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    That's the thing. They will expect you to pay grants back if you're not at uni for when the grant is paid for, same with university grants. Like I said you'd have to talk to SFE and the uni about it because I can't tell you how they'd handle your situation, just the general rules. My uni and SFE threatened that I'd have to pay back all my grants, but because of my mitigating circumstances they were written off, but if you just leave then that won't be the case.
    Ah I see. I think I'll take the exams then, it can't be that hard to get a 40 and pass for the Diploma (well I say that with my fingers crossed). Thank you for the help I'll do that then, at least I get the Diploma and save money.
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    SFE might not ask you to pay the grants back ASAP.

    When I left uni early first time round I wasn't asked to pay anything back. Then this year I was given a grant when I wasn't supposed to have one, and they sent me one letter asking for it to be paid back, but that was it, not heard anything from them since.
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    SFE might not ask you to pay the grants back ASAP.

    When I left uni early first time round I wasn't asked to pay anything back. Then this year I was given a grant when I wasn't supposed to have one, and they sent me one letter asking for it to be paid back, but that was it, not heard anything from them since.
    I did get one from my uni as well. I'll just take the exams if it's going to save me paying back anything. I'm just worried when I apply to uni again they'll see my shocking grades, but then again part of my drastic career change is that being so miserable and demotivated is having a massive effect on my grades and prior to uni my academic record is above average. My Mum pointed out earlier I also wouldn't be considered a student then over the summer so might be asked to pay council tax for that period. Are you classed as a student when taking Access for council tax purposes? It says the course is part time 3 days a week and I know you don't have to pay it when in full time education but not sure about part time..
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    I did get one from my uni as well. I'll just take the exams if it's going to save me paying back anything. I'm just worried when I apply to uni again they'll see my shocking grades, but then again part of my drastic career change is that being so miserable and demotivated is having a massive effect on my grades and prior to uni my academic record is above average. My Mum pointed out earlier I also wouldn't be considered a student then over the summer so might be asked to pay council tax for that period. Are you classed as a student when taking Access for council tax purposes? It says the course is part time 3 days a week and I know you don't have to pay it when in full time education but not sure about part time..
    Yes council tax has to be paid if you're studying part time unfortunately

    You will be considered a student at Uni until you withdraw, you're only not considered a student the summer after your final year exams. You're still considered a student in the summers between years.
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    Yes council tax has to be paid if you're studying part time unfortunately

    You will be considered a student at Uni until you withdraw, you're only not considered a student the summer after your final year exams. You're still considered a student in the summers between years.
    Ah it says 21 hours of college is a full time course so does that mean if I did my Access which is 16, plus another A level or something to make up the extra 5 hours, I'd be in full time study? Or does it have to be one single course?
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    Ah it says 21 hours of college is a full time course so does that mean if I did my Access which is 16, plus another A level or something to make up the extra 5 hours, I'd be in full time study? Or does it have to be one single course?
    I believe it has to be a single course. Unless you do the Access and the A Level in the same college that MIGHT be classed as full time. You'd probably have to check with the council.
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    I believe it has to be a single course. Unless you do the Access and the A Level in the same college that MIGHT be classed as full time. You'd probably have to check with the council.
    Ok, thank you they do offer the A level I want to do and I'm taking the AS exams in June anyway so it'd just be the A2. Wish I'd known to do this when I was in sixth form rather than now!
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    I think you will have to pay for the A2 if you're going to do it at college though, you might also have to pay for the Access Course depending on your age (if you're 19 - 23 you'll have to pay for it).
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    I think you will have to pay for the A2 if you're going to do it at college though, you might also have to pay for the Access Course depending on your age (if you're 19 - 23 you'll have to pay for it).
    Yeah I'll be 21 when I start so I'll be paying. If I have to pay council tax though I might as well pay for the A2 instead, at least I'll get the A level out of it (if I can do that).
 
 
 
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