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AQA a2 english lit B june 6th - notes and quotes of the gothic for Wuthering Heights! watch

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    Hey guys.. well i'm studying wuthering heights, the bloody chamber and macbeth, and honestly am struggling so much on wuthering heights and finding it difficult to talk about and relate to the gothic - i will definatley not be choosing it for section A!

    If anyone feels comfortable, or has a good insight could you share quotes? I'm willing to share some of mine on the other 2 texts im also studying..

    Think it would help making seperate forums for seperate texts because it just makes life easier not having to skim every single page to find someone who you can relate to
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    There are loads of Gothic elements to 'Wuthering Heights', but these don't present themselves as obviously as others like in 'Macbeth', 'Faustus' etc.

    First the setting is an extremely Gothic feature of the novel, the vast landscape of the moors instantly creates a feeling of the Sublime, a Gothic feature of feeling insignificant in the face of something extreme. The huge breadth of the moors instantly isolates the Heights and makes the inhabitants that reside there all the more isolated, instantly creating the feeling that they have 'no where to run' and also emphasizes that they are all stuck in the middle of a feud between the 'stormy' Earnshaws and the 'calm' Lintons (The idea of Calm and Storm is put forward by Lord David Cecil, you need to include critics in to cover the 'different interpretations' strand of the AOs)

    The setting's 'tumultuous' atmosphere also credits the Gothic as it seeks at representing the inner feelings of the characters, something that settings in the Gothic genre tend to do. The stormy weather exaggerates the characters feelings and emotions (pathetic fallacy.)

    Also, another element of the Gothic genre is oppositions, creating boundaries and binary oppositions works at setting up 'normal' and 'abnormal'- and can be seen through the two juxtaposing settings of Thrush Cross Grange and the Heights. But, a key factor that occurs in 'Wuthering Heights' is that Bronte does not stick to these extremes, what makes the novel all the more fear provoking (maybe not so now but definitely to a Victorian audience) is the sense that these boundaries are crossed. David Punter, a Gothic critic, wrote "Gothic writers focus on the fringe of the acceptable, as it is on this borderland that fear resides"- Here he puts forward the idea that by merging oppositions, and working on the 'borderland' it becomes fearful and Gothic because it creates ambiguity, the audience does not know what to expect.

    An example of this is Lockwood, when he comes into contact with Cathy's ghost. From the start of the novel Bronte sets up Lockwood as the civilized man who is supposed to represent Victorian society, when he meets the Ghost he grabbed it's arm and 'pulled it too and fro until the blood ran.' Here Bronte greatly converges boundaries, a civilized man turned extremely violent, therefore makes the reader question what he would do next, therefore creating ambiguity and fear.

    Heathcliff is a character who is extremely credits the Gothic, as he fully embodies an 'abhuman' state. A term which suggests that although the character is human, their personalities/behaviour hint at something supernatural. The fact that Heathcliff's character is constantly changing also links with the term 'abhuman.'

    "howled not like a man, but like a savage beast" "he gnashed at me and foamed like a mad dog"- Bronte's savage, bestial imagery adds to the sense of Gothic, so much so that critics have often stated that Heathcliff has 'vampire' qualities.

    He also appears a Byronic hero, one whom the audience know is not 'good for them' but still insist on seeing as a 'romantic hero.' In terms of A04 Bronte read a lot of Byron's work when she was younger, which many have said informed her creation of Heathcliff.

    Cathy (the first one!) also has elements of the Gothic within her character. She is described as having a 'double character,' i.e. one personality when she is around Edgar and another when she is around Heathcliff. It has been argued that this is what sent her man, seen through when she looks in the mirror and states "I see a face in it" she does not recognize herself anymore. The idea of having a 'double personality' is an extremely Gothic element that Gothic writers use a lot, seen in 'Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde' etc.

    The ghosts that are seen walking to moor at the end of the novel also create a sense of the Gothic, the Victorian audience would have very much believed in the supernatural and most likely would have found this image quite disturbing. But to the modern day audience, the idea that Cathy and Heathcliff were together in death almost appears oddly refreshing, and in the face of all the other weird and gruesome images presented in the novel, the idea of them walking the moors as ghosts doesn't seem all that strange!

    There are more but they are failing to come to mind at this moment in time!

    Hope all that helps, i'm doing the exam on Thursday too,

    Good Luck!
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    (Original post by Sb94)
    There are loads of Gothic elements to 'Wuthering Heights', but these don't present themselves as obviously as others like in 'Macbeth', 'Faustus' etc.

    First the setting is an extremely Gothic feature of the novel, the vast landscape of the moors instantly creates a feeling of the Sublime, a Gothic feature of feeling insignificant in the face of something extreme. The huge breadth of the moors instantly isolates the Heights and makes the inhabitants that reside there all the more isolated, instantly creating the feeling that they have 'no where to run' and also emphasizes that they are all stuck in the middle of a feud between the 'stormy' Earnshaws and the 'calm' Lintons (The idea of Calm and Storm is put forward by Lord David Cecil, you need to include critics in to cover the 'different interpretations' strand of the AOs)

    The setting's 'tumultuous' atmosphere also credits the Gothic as it seeks at representing the inner feelings of the characters, something that settings in the Gothic genre tend to do. The stormy weather exaggerates the characters feelings and emotions (pathetic fallacy.)

    Also, another element of the Gothic genre is oppositions, creating boundaries and binary oppositions works at setting up 'normal' and 'abnormal'- and can be seen through the two juxtaposing settings of Thrush Cross Grange and the Heights. But, a key factor that occurs in 'Wuthering Heights' is that Bronte does not stick to these extremes, what makes the novel all the more fear provoking (maybe not so now but definitely to a Victorian audience) is the sense that these boundaries are crossed. David Punter, a Gothic critic, wrote "Gothic writers focus on the fringe of the acceptable, as it is on this borderland that fear resides"- Here he puts forward the idea that by merging oppositions, and working on the 'borderland' it becomes fearful and Gothic because it creates ambiguity, the audience does not know what to expect.

    An example of this is Lockwood, when he comes into contact with Cathy's ghost. From the start of the novel Bronte sets up Lockwood as the civilized man who is supposed to represent Victorian society, when he meets the Ghost he grabbed it's arm and 'pulled it too and fro until the blood ran.' Here Bronte greatly converges boundaries, a civilized man turned extremely violent, therefore makes the reader question what he would do next, therefore creating ambiguity and fear.

    Heathcliff is a character who is extremely credits the Gothic, as he fully embodies an 'abhuman' state. A term which suggests that although the character is human, their personalities/behaviour hint at something supernatural. The fact that Heathcliff's character is constantly changing also links with the term 'abhuman.'

    "howled not like a man, but like a savage beast" "he gnashed at me and foamed like a mad dog"- Bronte's savage, bestial imagery adds to the sense of Gothic, so much so that critics have often stated that Heathcliff has 'vampire' qualities.

    He also appears a Byronic hero, one whom the audience know is not 'good for them' but still insist on seeing as a 'romantic hero.' In terms of A04 Bronte read a lot of Byron's work when she was younger, which many have said informed her creation of Heathcliff.

    Cathy (the first one!) also has elements of the Gothic within her character. She is described as having a 'double character,' i.e. one personality when she is around Edgar and another when she is around Heathcliff. It has been argued that this is what sent her man, seen through when she looks in the mirror and states "I see a face in it" she does not recognize herself anymore. The idea of having a 'double personality' is an extremely Gothic element that Gothic writers use a lot, seen in 'Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde' etc.

    The ghosts that are seen walking to moor at the end of the novel also create a sense of the Gothic, the Victorian audience would have very much believed in the supernatural and most likely would have found this image quite disturbing. But to the modern day audience, the idea that Cathy and Heathcliff were together in death almost appears oddly refreshing, and in the face of all the other weird and gruesome images presented in the novel, the idea of them walking the moors as ghosts doesn't seem all that strange!

    There are more but they are failing to come to mind at this moment in time!

    Hope all that helps, i'm doing the exam on Thursday too,

    Good Luck!
    very impressive if you just typed that up from memory!
    Hows revision going? i'm feeling a lot more confident with the texts with context and the gothic in general, and quotes are enough to get by hopefully on all questions if the questions arent too harsh!

    currently focusing on themes that may come up, especially for section B as I've decided im going to do macbeth on section A because i find its so much easier to talk about!
 
 
 
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