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    At 18/19 years old with exams coming up...is a doctor likely to prescribe drugs in order to help quickly with anxiety and depression, rather than just counselling alone?
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    It depends how bad your depression is and what you want.
    I've recently been diagnosed with depression, and my doctor advised that I get counselling at my university and try and do some exercise. She also gave me the option of taking antidepressants which I took.
    I've looked a lot online and apparently it's best to start with counselling. Some doctors won't even prescribe medication until you've been through counselling and your depression and anxiety is at a certain level.


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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    At 18/19 years old with exams coming up...is a doctor likely to prescribe drugs in order to help quickly with anxiety and depression, rather than just counselling alone?
    If you're looking for a quick fix it's very unlikely it's going to happen although it does depend on the severity of your depression and the causes of it. If your depression is only mild and temporary then a quick fix may work.

    Whether or not drugs will be prescribed or alternative therapies such as counselling used will depend on the level of your depression. There are too many variables to consider to give you an accurate answer on the limited information provided.

    How long have you had depression and anxiety for? what caused it? What are your symptoms, how is it effecting you on a day to day basis?
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    We really need more information to help, but please don't convince yourself that you need drugs to cure yourself. The drugs don't always work, come with side effects and only act as a treatment, not a cure. And of course there's the whole dependency issues too.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    At 18/19 years old with exams coming up...is a doctor likely to prescribe drugs in order to help quickly with anxiety and depression, rather than just counselling alone?
    Hoping it may help you, I'd like to refer you to my post #3659 on the Anxiety experiences and support thread. Just click the link

    I've referred a lot of people to it - I don't mean to sound like a preacher, but it is found to be helpful by many.
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    Whilst drugs are certainly helpful for a lot of people and necessary for a small number, they're not a quick fix and in the short term can make you feel crappy with side effects until you get used to them. So depending on when your exams are you might not want to start them. Probably wanna just give counselling a try for a while.
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    In my experience they were very willing to prescribe medication, but therapy wasn't really offered.
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    I was recently diagnosed and after a couple of counsellor meetings I decided that it wasn't for me and I was put on medication. My GP felt that due to the close proximity of exams that meds were probably the best solution.


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    I'm just 17 and was put on anti depressants about a month ago. They decided not to go with just councelling as I find it difficult to talk to people! The doctor did suggest I see my college counsellor though. I've also been put on diazepam for my anxiety/insomnia.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    At 18/19 years old with exams coming up...is a doctor likely to prescribe drugs in order to help quickly with anxiety and depression, rather than just counselling alone?
    Are you referring to benzodiazepines?

    Because of the depression, probably not. If it was just the anxiety/panic along then it's possible.

    How long have you known this doctor? If you've seen the same one regularly, then it's possible.

    Any history of drug-seeking behaviour, addiction, alcohol dependency, then no.

    Most doctors at university are reluctant to prescribe the shorter-acting medications. It's usually SSRIs, unless these have not worked for you in the past or you specifically request non-SSRIs.

    You'll need to talk to your doctor about your options. There's a few antidepressants that work a bit quicker than SSRIs, e.g. Mirtazapine, Buspirone etc.

    There's only a few medications that will eliminate depression for several hours at a time, and these are usually given to patients with severe chronic pain or the terminally ill.
 
 
 
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