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Shortage subject PGCE teachers, how does the £20,000 award work? watch

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    I am a modern language graduate on course for a first and I gather that if I take/finish a PGCE I will be given a bribe of £20,000. I have a few questions if anyone can answer:
    1. Is this money contingent on actually continuing into the teaching profession?
    2. Is it tax-free?
    3. Would I still receive a student loan under the extended student finance scheme?
    4. Do you actually have to spend it on stuff or have all of you on PGCE's saved yours?
    5. Can you still get it if you live at home with your parents?

    Thank you very much for any responses.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    I am a modern language graduate on course for a first and I gather that if I take/finish a PGCE I will be given a bribe of £20,000. I have a few questions if anyone can answer:
    1. Is this money contingent on actually continuing into the teaching profession?
    2. Is it tax-free?
    3. Would I still receive a student loan under the extended student finance scheme?
    4. Do you actually have to spend it on stuff or have all of you on PGCE's saved yours?
    5. Can you still get it if you live at home with your parents?

    Thank you very much for any responses.
    1) No - if you drop out of the course obviously you don't receive any more payments, but you don't have to repay it if you don't get a job at the end of the course. But it's not worth doing the course just for the money - the workload is insane at times. During my first placement I was basically working every waking hour in the week.
    2) Yes.
    3) Yes - you can get a student loan to pay your tuition fees, and a maintenance loan (about £3,000) as well.
    4) A mixture. I pay my rent and food costs with mine, and a fair bit goes on petrol for uni/placements, plus bits and bobs like stationery, but I've managed to save quite a lot.
    5) Yes.

    You don't have to apply for it - the Teaching Agency pays it to the university and the university pays it to you (they ask for your bank details at the start of the course, and we got our first payment by cheque to speed it up a bit).

    It comes in nine monthly installments, with a bigger payment in February and at the end of the course. On £20,000 the monthly payment is around £1,500.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    1) No - if you drop out of the course obviously you don't receive any more payments, but you don't have to repay it if you don't get a job at the end of the course. But it's not worth doing the course just for the money - the workload is insane at times. During my first placement I was basically working every waking hour in the week.
    2) Yes.
    3) Yes - you can get a student loan to pay your tuition fees, and a maintenance loan (about £3,000) as well.
    4) A mixture. I pay my rent and food costs with mine, and a fair bit goes on petrol for uni/placements, plus bits and bobs like stationery, but I've managed to save quite a lot.
    5) Yes.

    You don't have to apply for it - the Teaching Agency pays it to the university and the university pays it to you (they ask for your bank details at the start of the course, and we got our first payment by cheque to speed it up a bit).

    It comes in nine monthly installments, with a bigger payment in February and at the end of the course. On £20,000 the monthly payment is around £1,500.
    Could I ask you some questions about it? Is it given to all graduates, no matter what subject they are doing or their nationality? Or is it just for British citizens and/or has an application procedure where only the best get it?

    *edit* nvm...I found the answer myself. Apparently my subject is not important enough to qualify for nothing but the minimum award (9K). Ah well, enjoy having a shortage of teachers UK
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    1) No - if you drop out of the course obviously you don't receive any more payments, but you don't have to repay it if you don't get a job at the end of the course. But it's not worth doing the course just for the money - the workload is insane at times. During my first placement I was basically working every waking hour in the week.
    2) Yes.
    3) Yes - you can get a student loan to pay your tuition fees, and a maintenance loan (about £3,000) as well.
    4) A mixture. I pay my rent and food costs with mine, and a fair bit goes on petrol for uni/placements, plus bits and bobs like stationery, but I've managed to save quite a lot.
    5) Yes.

    You don't have to apply for it - the Teaching Agency pays it to the university and the university pays it to you (they ask for your bank details at the start of the course, and we got our first payment by cheque to speed it up a bit).

    It comes in nine monthly installments, with a bigger payment in February and at the end of the course. On £20,000 the monthly payment is around £1,500.
    Goodness gracious, what's the catch?! Apart from the piles of work

    Thanks for your help
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    (Original post by *Corinna*)
    Could I ask you some questions about it? Is it given to all graduates, no matter what subject they are doing or their nationality? Or is it just for British citizens and/or has an application procedure where only the best get it?

    *edit* nvm...I found the answer myself. Apparently my subject is not important enough to qualify for nothing but the minimum award (9K). Ah well, enjoy having a shortage of teachers UK
    Only the subject that have an actual shortage get the 20k bursary, and even then you need a 1st in your degree to get that. There isn't really a shortage nationally of teachers other than slightly in maths & science subjects. If you look at the TES forums its clear that there isn't really a shortage of MFL teachers, as so many trainees struggle to get jobs in that area.
    Your motivation to get into teaching shouldn't be the bursary you get anyway.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Only the subject that have an actual shortage get the 20k bursary, and even then you need a 1st in your degree to get that. There isn't really a shortage nationally of teachers other than slightly in maths & science subjects. If you look at the TES forums its clear that there isn't really a shortage of MFL teachers, as so many trainees struggle to get jobs in that area.
    Your motivation to get into teaching shouldn't be the bursary you get anyway.
    I don't particularly plan to get into teaching at the moment. It's just an option if other things don't work out. I do not teach modern languages (why would you assume that I do?) and generally there aren't many teachers for my subject (but then again there isn't much demand either so I don't know...perhaps if there were more teachers the subject would be a bit more widespread than it is now).
    I also don't think it's a matter of people doing it to get the money, it's because when you have already paid for your previous degrees it is impossible to fund yet one more. Especially if you are an EU student, where there is only the possibility to get a loan for your tuition fees, if I am correct.
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    (Original post by *Corinna*)
    I don't particularly plan to get into teaching at the moment. It's just an option if other things don't work out. I do not teach modern languages (why would you assume that I do?) and generally there aren't many teachers for my subject (but then again there isn't much demand either so I don't know...perhaps if there were more teachers the subject would be a bit more widespread than it is now).
    I also don't think it's a matter of people doing it to get the money, it's because when you have already paid for your previous degrees it is impossible to fund yet one more. Especially if you are an EU student, where there is only the possibility to get a loan for your tuition fees, if I am correct.
    I assumed you knew which subjects the government was targeting for the 20k bursary. These are Maths, Physics, Chemistry and MFL. Which are the subjects I spoke about in my reply. I wasn't assuming that you taught MFL, I was merely illustrating that there isn't that much of a shortage of teachers in the UK.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    I assumed you knew which subjects the government was targeting for the 20k bursary. These are Maths, Physics, Chemistry and MFL. Which are the subjects I spoke about in my reply. I wasn't assuming that you taught MFL, I was merely illustrating that there isn't that much of a shortage of teachers in the UK.
    Ah fair enough, my subject is not actually on the list, it's listed as one of the 9K ones in a footnote
 
 
 
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