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    Hi, I have to write a technical report and i have found a book which has a table of data which is exactly what I need. I am wondering how I should use the data and want to know if i can scan the page of the book into the PC, and then use the scan of the table in my report? If I reference this properly then is it OK to do this
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    You could scan it, or just re-write it. It depends which is easiest and fastest. During the course of research for various topics, reports have shown the same data in different ways - sometimes omitting unnecessary data, but all from the same source.

    Your university should have a referencing guide to offer, because not all referencing systems are the same. We use the Harvard system, but even so, it's slightly different to how other universities will present the same thing.


    In-text citation:

    "Figure number. 'A title about the data you're showing' (Reference's surname/organisation Date of publication)"

    E.G:

    Figure 1. Shaft diameters and clearance fits (Matthews 2012)

    Use "n.d" if there is no obvious date, and "et al." after the first author when referencing multiple authors.


    List of references:

    "Author surname, first letter of first name. (Date of publication) 'book title in italics' [edition] Place of publication: Publisher"

    E.G

    Matthews, C. (2012) Engineers' Data Book 4th edn. Cambridge: Wiley


    If data isn't available (editions, location, publisher, etc) then either research the actual book name, or just guess as best you can. Leave it out if you really can't find anything on it.


    If the data is a web-source (I'm presuming it's a printed book and not a Powerpoint someone put together) then it would follow the same format but instead of the edition, location and publisher you would change that bit to:

    [online] available from <complete web address of the .pdf or file or whatever, even just the webpage in pointed brackets> [date accessed]

    E.G

    Matthews, C. (2012) Engineers' Data Book [online] available from <www.cmatthews.com/data/booklets/fits/clearance/clearance_fits.pdf> [6th April 2013]



    I hope this helps. But there are different ways to reference information. Try to provide the original source where possible. There are other rules for journals, articles, etc as well though.
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    Hi thanks for your reply. Thats cleared it up as we use harvard but I Just wanted to make sure it wouldnt be plaigarism if i scanned a page out of a printed book and used it in my report provided it was referenced properly.
 
 
 
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