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    A retail company is opening a new store in Neo Kobe city, the manager hires 15 or 20 people telling them they'll be working 16 hours a week, but may and can be given more hours every week which may or may not be mandatory, depends. So a base 16 hours + "overtime" if any (no special overtime pay, same rate as normal hours).

    In short, a few days before the store opens up to a few weeks after, the weekly rotas reveal each week that most of the staff are working 7 days a week of 8 hours a day (reduced to 6 hours after the first week).

    The manager's a nice bloke and is lenient, and one bloke who'd been consequently working for 24 days in a row got a day off without hassle when he asked for it, but manager's taking the easy route here of just dishing out hours rather than hiring more straight away. It's put to the manager that it's the law (note: Working Time Regulations 1998) that workers must be given either 24 uninterrupted hours off a week or an uninterrupted 48 hours fortnightly (a day off a week or two days in a row off every two weeks). He says "noooo, you're a flexible part time contract".

    The manager's talking a load of *******s, right?
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    I think the workers would have to check exactly what they signed. Normally overtime is voluntary and the manager should have to check if the hours are ok before setting them in stone. Also you have to sign a document from the governemt if you want to work over 45 hrs per week, which also includes second jobs and studying. If this is the workers only job and they aren't studying they still shouldnt work more than 45 hrs per week but if the contract says that they agree to overtime without consent then I think the manager is actually right in what he says.
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    (Original post by Scotty Bear)
    I think the workers would have to check exactly what they signed. Normally overtime is voluntary and the manager should have to check if the hours are ok before setting them in stone. Also you have to sign a document from the governemt if you want to work over 45 hrs per week, which also includes second jobs and studying. If this is the workers only job and they aren't studying they still shouldnt work more than 45 hrs per week but if the contract says that they agree to overtime without consent then I think the manager is actually right in what he says.
    I'm talking about the working without a weekly break.
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    I'm talking about the working without a weekly break.
    They'd still have to check and see exactly what they signed. If there are no clauses in there, then yeah the manager is definately wrong
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    I'm talking about the working without a weekly break.
    Same thing.

    Working hours per week should be 48 hours unless you sign agreeing to work over that limit.

    So working 8 hours a day for 7 days a week is 56 hours in total. I would check what you have signed and agreed to.

    Opting out of the 48-hour week
    Workers 18 or over who want to work more than 48 hours a week, can choose to opt out of the 48-hour limit.

    This could be for a certain period or indefinitely. It must be voluntary and in writing.

    It can’t be contained in an agreement with the whole workforce. However, employers are allowed to ask individual workers if they’d be willing to opt out.

    An employer shouldn’t sack or unfairly treat a worker (eg refused promotion) for refusing to sign an opt-out.

    Workers who can’t opt out

    Employers must not allow the following staff to opt out:

    workers on ships or boats
    airline staff
    workers in the road transport industry, eg delivery drivers (except for drivers of vehicles under 3.5 tonnes using GB Domestic drivers’ hours rules)
    other staff who travel in and operate vehicles covered by EU rules on drivers’ hours, eg bus conductors
    security guards on a vehicle carrying high-value goods
    Cancelling an opt-out agreement

    A worker can cancel their opt-out agreement whenever they want - even if it’s part of their employment contract.

    They must give their employer at least 7 days’ notice. This could be longer (up to 3 months) if the worker previously agreed this in the written opt-out agreement with the employer.

    The employer isn’t allowed to force a worker to cancel their opt-out agreement.

    Example of opt-out agreement:

    I [worker’s name] agree that I may work for more than an average of 48 hours a week. If I change my mind, I will give my employer [amount of time - up to 3 months’] notice in writing to end this agreement. Signed……………………
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