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Do you have to have had PILOT or TEST PILOT experience to be an astronaut? Watch

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    Hey, basically, i know this is cliche as ****, but i want to be an astronaut when i'm older.


    My life plan is as follows. I've been accepted onto a course at nottingham uni to study aerospace engineering.

    From there, i plan to join the RAF as an Aerosystems Engineering officer, while completing my phD in Aerospace Engineering.

    After, i plan to try and join the ESA as an Engineer, and hopefully one day, and Astronaut.


    Now, even though i plan to get my eyesight CORRECTED to 20/20, i haven't got 20/20 vision at the moment, so am not eligible for PILOT or TEST PILOT experience in the RAF.


    Will this hold me back?
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    As far as Im aware, 15/20 is the absolute minimum for astronauts - some even have 10/20...
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    (Original post by jamesrobbo1)
    As far as Im aware, 15/20 is the absolute minimum for astronauts - some even have 10/20...
    ESA definatley state a minimum of 20/20 , but do you know anything regarding the piloting experience thing?
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    Its an insanely competetive area - you might want to speak directly to an RAF recruiter, because your career path involves a lot of specific decisions. Cant help any more mate, sorry.

    Best of luck!
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    20/100 is the natural minimum so to speak for astronauts as long as its corrected or is correctable to 20/20 it won't hold you back. Are you planning to be an actual pilot? If so you won't have a shot without a lot of flight time in military grade jets however if you are looking at becoming a specialist they don't usually require any piloting experience.
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    (Original post by Darth Stewie)
    20/100 is the natural minimum so to speak for astronauts as long as its corrected or is correctable to 20/20 it won't hold you back. Are you planning to be an actual pilot? If so you won't have a shot without a lot of flight time in military grade jets however if you are looking at becoming a specialist they don't usually require any piloting experience.
    Well i'm planning on becoming a doctor in aerospace engineering, if that helps, i.e to become a payload specalist?
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    Well i'm planning on becoming a doctor in aerospace engineering, if that helps, i.e to become a payload specalist?
    Payload specialists don't tend to be pilots, if you like the idea of learning to fly private lessons certainly wouldn't be a bad thing however it isn't vital (your academic achievements are much more important). I don't believe there has been a British payload specialist yet so you might be able to get your name down in the history books if you are successful.
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    (Original post by Darth Stewie)
    Payload specialists don't tend to be pilots, if you like the idea of learning to fly private lessons certainly wouldn't be a bad thing however it isn't vital (your academic achievements are much more important). I don't believe there has been a British payload specialist yet so you might be able to get your name down in the history books if you are successful.
    Thats the dreeeeeeam! I might learn russian and take a few flying lessons in or out of the RAF.
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    4 days ago you were going to be a chemical engineering graduate. I guess things move fast.
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    (Original post by ProStacker)
    4 days ago you were going to be a chemical engineering graduate. I guess things move fast.
    Hahaha. yeah man i was planning on joining the NAVY instead of RAF but want to join the RAF now so i needed to do either aerospace, mechanical or electrical
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    (Original post by Porkchop)
    You want to be an astronaut, you say? That, my friend, is the biggest feat you will ever embark on in your lifetime. To begin, I'll talk you through the career path you'll want to choose. I understand you want to become an ESA astronaut, well it's been my dream to become a NASA astronaut, but to become either is almost identical.

    There are two different types of astronaut; Pilot and mission specialist. Pilots are the ones who fly the spacecraft, at the moment it's the Russian Soyuz, in the future it will be the American Orion. Mission specialists are the scientists or engineers who are vital to any mission, at the moment, they carry out scientific experiments assigned to them by their agency. They can have expertise in any Science/Mathematics/Engineering field ranging from Biology to Aeronautical Engineering.

    Pilot Astronaut. For starters, these tend to be either American or Russian, as they are the owners of the spacecraft (Shuttle, Soyuz, Orion). At first, you need a degree in Engineering, for example Aerospace, Aeronautical, Astronautical, Mechanical. Following this, you need to join any military branch as a PILOT OFFICER (This is important as you need to be an officer and have a piloting background to be an astronaut). Eventually, after a couple of years, you can apply to become a test pilot for your military branch, it's not necessary, but it's highly desirable. Getting a graduate degree in your engineering field is also desirable as there is a lot of competition, and of course, if you truly love what you do, then it's worth it. Sooner or later, you'll have all the requirements to be considered as a 'highly qualified applicant' and actually stand a chance of becoming an astronaut.

    Mission Specialist. As I said before, these can have a background in any scientific, mathematical or engineering field. You'll need to have A LOT of experience in this field (A Ph.D/Sc.D and several years of related professional experience). If you're a mission specialist, you don't need to have any knowledge on flying an aircraft.

    As for the eyesight query, for pilots, the requirements are 20/100 correctible to 20/20. For mission specialist, 20/200 correctible to 20/20.

    Here are several useful resources as to the requirements of astronauts. The ESA one is a bit vague, the NASA one is a bit more in depth.

    I hope I was of some use, and good luck on becoming an astronaut!
    Hahaha, cheers man!!! Hey, i'm aiming for mission specialist, will 9 years experience as an Aerosystems engineer (meanwhile completing my phD) followed by a research job at ESA, do you rekon thats the right sort of path?
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    (Original post by Porkchop)
    As long as you go to an accredited institution to study, yes.
    Have you been looking at NASA or ESA or a privatley funded company?


    Do you have any idea on the type of research programmes available for ESA? Like you said, they're website is extrememly vague, all the info is sort of generic for every job!
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    (Original post by Porkchop)
    Actually, I've been looking at taking the Test Pilot path through the United States Air Force.
    Ahhh i see, you have a better chance than me then! good luck
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    Hahaha. yeah man i was planning on joining the NAVY instead of RAF but want to join the RAF now so i needed to do either aerospace, mechanical or electrical
    You'll have to explain the route from Chemistry to the RN because I can't see it.
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    (Original post by ProStacker)
    You'll have to explain the route from Chemistry to the RN because I can't see it.
    the RN accepts chemical engineering grads for it's engineering officer program
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    Hey, basically, i know this is cliche as ****, but i want to be an astronaut when i'm older.
    OMG!! im so glad to know im not the only one in the universe who wants to be an astronaut!!

    normally when people ask me what i want to be and i say astronaut, my friends criticise me saying i have much more chances of being struck by lightning than becoming an astronaut. also only 1 person in a million becomes an astrononaut.

    everyone says you need to be very very fit. also extremely smart with As & A*s in all maths and sciences at A level (or if you do IB etc,then the highest marks in all the maths and sciences).
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    Being an Astronaut isn't all about grades.

    Yes it helps to be well qualified and I wouldn't think they'd take anyone who isn't an academically accomplished engineer of sorts. For Pilots you need to have lots of Fast Jet experience and ideally have been a test pilot. However a large proportion will be given to how good you are at your job and the type of person you are. You could be the best pilot or engineer on earth but if you're have an abrasive personality you can guarantee you won't be accepted.
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    Stumbled across this, thought you might be interested:
    http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/prospectu...do?id=H4602014

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    (Original post by HeavyTeddy)
    Stumbled across this, thought you might be interested:
    http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/prospectu...do?id=H4602014

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    That's fine if you want to do Aero Eng and fly a small single-engined piston plane about at great expense
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    (Original post by Schleigg)
    That's fine if you want to do Aero Eng and fly a small single-engined piston plane about at great expense
    ..lol my bad.

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