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    This could just be me having a late night breakdown but I can't sleep so I thought I may as well gain public opinion.
    I'm currently studying law at Cambridge and absolutely hating my subject. If I'm honest with myself I think I worked out that it wasn't for me quite early on but only took action in the last couple of months. My supervisor and tutor have advised me to carry on until after exams and then see how I feel about changing subjects (this is what I originally planned on doing).
    I have always been very interested in psychology so have been considering changing either to PPS or to the new PBS course (it hasn't been made clear to me which one I'd move into next year, however much I've asked). However, to be able to do this, I need to get a 2.1 in my first year of Law. Although my supervisor has said I will get a 2.1 "unless there's any major disastors", I'm not confident that with the level of revision i've been doing (virtually none) I will be able to achieve that.
    I think the reason that I'm finding it so hard to revise is that I absolutely hate the subject. Constitutional law is bearable to me, but all of the other topics we are studying make me want to burst out in tears.
    A further concern, now that I've started to try and revise, is that maybe moving subjects isn't going to be the right thing for me either. Despite doing well at my a levels etc, I don't know if education is the thing for me. Exams are just my worst nightmare, and doing independent study is just something I can rarely bring myself to do.
    Socially, I am having an absolutely amazing time and this is what is posing the biggest problem for me. My friends are amazing, possibly some of the best friends I've ever had, and the thought of losing contact with them is almost unbearable. I know lots of people will be like "it's fine, they'll still be your friends' but I'm pretty much certain that that won't be the case in reality. We'll have less in common to talk about and I won't see them as often and I just kind of know that we won't be the friends we are now if I drop out. I also love all the social traditions at Cambridge. I organise most of the swaps for out drinking society and love the formals and everything and in some ways I know I would regret leaving, but in others it seems the only way forward.
    Just to make it clear, I have no aspirations of becoming a lawyer - that went completely out of the window once I'd started the degree.
    Does anyone have any advice on what my career prospects would be as a drop out? I've always been interested in marketing and/or working for somewhere like Deloitte or KPMG but I'm worried that they'll feel that I have a lack of motivation.
    If you were me, what would you do?
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    (Just realised how this is just a big block of text, sorry)
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    (Original post by whatdoidoah)
    This could just be me having a late night breakdown but I can't sleep so I thought I may as well gain public opinion.
    I'm currently studying law at Cambridge and absolutely hating my subject. If I'm honest with myself I think I worked out that it wasn't for me quite early on but only took action in the last couple of months. My supervisor and tutor have advised me to carry on until after exams and then see how I feel about changing subjects (this is what I originally planned on doing).
    I have always been very interested in psychology so have been considering changing either to PPS or to the new PBS course (it hasn't been made clear to me which one I'd move into next year, however much I've asked). However, to be able to do this, I need to get a 2.1 in my first year of Law. Although my supervisor has said I will get a 2.1 "unless there's any major disastors", I'm not confident that with the level of revision i've been doing (virtually none) I will be able to achieve that.
    I think the reason that I'm finding it so hard to revise is that I absolutely hate the subject. Constitutional law is bearable to me, but all of the other topics we are studying make me want to burst out in tears.
    A further concern, now that I've started to try and revise, is that maybe moving subjects isn't going to be the right thing for me either. Despite doing well at my a levels etc, I don't know if education is the thing for me. Exams are just my worst nightmare, and doing independent study is just something I can rarely bring myself to do.
    Socially, I am having an absolutely amazing time and this is what is posing the biggest problem for me. My friends are amazing, possibly some of the best friends I've ever had, and the thought of losing contact with them is almost unbearable. I know lots of people will be like "it's fine, they'll still be your friends' but I'm pretty much certain that that won't be the case in reality. We'll have less in common to talk about and I won't see them as often and I just kind of know that we won't be the friends we are now if I drop out. I also love all the social traditions at Cambridge. I organise most of the swaps for out drinking society and love the formals and everything and in some ways I know I would regret leaving, but in others it seems the only way forward.
    Just to make it clear, I have no aspirations of becoming a lawyer - that went completely out of the window once I'd started the degree.
    Does anyone have any advice on what my career prospects would be as a drop out? I've always been interested in marketing and/or working for somewhere like Deloitte or KPMG but I'm worried that they'll feel that I have a lack of motivation.
    If you were me, what would you do?
    Your best bet is staying the year and trying to scrape a 2:1 and then switching. Think logically about it. If you drop out now, then you're in limbo until Sept when I assume you'd re-apply for another course?

    I don't think your prospects would be affected. In theory, you could just make it appear on your CV that you took a couple of years out after your A-Levels. Are you sure you'd enjoy working for somewhere like KPMG or Deloitte in the future though...Accountancy is surely almost as dry as Law. That's another issue. If you drop out now you've missed the deadline, so you'd be applying for 2014 entry. How would you manage to fill almost 18 months?

    I wouldn't write off education so quickly... I presume you have at least A*AA at A-Level. You need to think very carefully. If you don't go to university, what do you plan to do? If you're not interested in studying PPS then you've got a big problem and maybe it'd be wise to take some time out to refresh your mind and consider your options.

    On a personal note, as someone who may be embarking on a law degree at Oxford soon, this hasn't filled me with optimism. Did you do any research before starting? What made you choose Law?
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    I'm really sorry to read this. It's tragic.

    Honestly, I would force myself to be interested in the subject. I would try and contrive/look for some interest.

    If you have tried that and can't, then switch subjects. You certainly will feel pretty depressed leaving, and yes, it won't be the same with your friends. These should be the best years of your life. You do not want to be dropping out. The job market in the UK is really bad and you'll be going back to your parents' place defeated. Wait for the weather to get better and get yourself some sunshine and think about it.


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    (Original post by whatdoidoah)
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    Can I just say that I can empathize with you completely because I'm in the exact same situation.

    My particular problem is that I don't even think I'll even pass, let alone get a 2:1 and I'm afraid that other courses will be reluctant to take me should I fail. I'm genuinely considering just dropping out before exam periods and get an N/A than show prospective course admissions staff a straight fail.

    I'm going to link you some of the answers I got after a similar thread I made about this; hopefully it may help give you some perspective.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2283326

    It's quite refreshing to see that I'm not alone!
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    (Original post by LoseSmallWinBig)
    Your best bet is staying the year and trying to scrape a 2:1 and then switching. Think logically about it. If you drop out now, then you're in limbo until Sept when I assume you'd re-apply for another course?

    I don't think your prospects would be affected. In theory, you could just make it appear on your CV that you took a couple of years out after your A-Levels. Are you sure you'd enjoy working for somewhere like KPMG or Deloitte in the future though...Accountancy is surely almost as dry as Law. That's another issue. If you drop out now you've missed the deadline, so you'd be applying for 2014 entry. How would you manage to fill almost 18 months?

    I wouldn't write off education so quickly... I presume you have at least A*AA at A-Level. You need to think very carefully. If you don't go to university, what do you plan to do? If you're not interested in studying PPS then you've got a big problem and maybe it'd be wise to take some time out to refresh your mind and consider your options.

    On a personal note, as someone who may be embarking on a law degree at Oxford soon, this hasn't filled me with optimism. Did you do any research before starting? What made you choose Law?
    Yeah, I think your right about trying for the 2.1. If I put it in perspective, 2 months of hell is worth it in the long run. I've been in contact with my supervisor and now know I don't need to make final decisions about switching course until the summer holidays so at least I will have time do dwell over it.

    Don't let me put you off doing a law degree at all! I did do my research and everything but for me I wasn't doing law because it fascinated me but just because there was nothing else that particularly interested me. As long as you know that it's something that you could read about for hours you'll be fune. Just don't make a rash decision to do a law degree, and don't feel like your stuck with the decision you've made just because you got an offer from oxbridge.
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    (Original post by Ras17)
    Can I just say that I can empathize with you completely because I'm in the exact same situation.

    My particular problem is that I don't even think I'll even pass, let alone get a 2:1 and I'm afraid that other courses will be reluctant to take me should I fail. I'm genuinely considering just dropping out before exam periods and get an N/A than show prospective course admissions staff a straight fail.

    I'm going to link you some of the answers I got after a similar thread I made about this; hopefully it may help give you some perspective.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2283326

    It's quite refreshing to see that I'm not alone!
    Thank god it isn't just me! I think the reason it happens with law more than other subjects is that we start from nothing and don't really have any prior knowledge in the subject before starting.
    I'm just reading through the thread now, thanks!
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    If you don't like it then of course you should

    Stop wasting your time working on things you don't like doing and go out there and make a life you do like living...getting a good degree from Oxbridge is not everything, you know.
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    You'll probably regret dropping out of Cambridge for the rest of your life.

    Just plow through as you've only got a couple of months before summer. I hate doing A-levels as I didn't really pick my subjects; i'm doing psychology which I find really boring and I find myself just glaring at the words. But, I know that i've only got a couple of months left then i'll be going to university to study something that I love.

    Why don't you just go for a walk around Cambridge and remind yourself why you're there. How beautiful the city is, how you love the people and in a few months you'll transfer to a course you'll enjoy.

    I think you should stick it out til summer- if you fail your exams then you can drop out and get a job
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    I would certainly tough it out until the exams are over, and (as your tutor said) see how your results stack up. You might find that getting a good grade re-inspires you and perks you up a bit. You could then swap courses, and be happier that way. If your results don't go well, then you could always drop out and go to another university, and do another course, but I definitely wouldn't make any rash decisions at this stage. As a lot if others have said, it is quite possible you would regret dropping out. Not sure if you mentioned it in your post, but are you a first year? If so, you might find life improves in second and third year- I HATED my course in first year, but fell in academic love in second year, and life got better Whatever decision you make, do what will make you happy, as success will happen more easily if you enjoy yourself
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    Thanks everyone! Out of interest, if I were to take my exams and do really badly and thus decide to drop out would I have to declare my bad grades in job applications? That's one of the only things that's worrying me about carrying on..
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    I thin if you don't finish the degree you don't put it at all on cv, but something like Cambridge would give you competitive advantage, I know it hard but stick it our for a bit longer I dropped out college and restarted as, though even staying at home can be tiring and drain the life out of you, come on just do it find that little bit if extra motivation, don't you wanna throw those black hats at graduation in the air with your friends wouldn't be a moment to miss
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    (Original post by whatdoidoah)
    This could just be me having a late night breakdown but I can't sleep so I thought I may as well gain public opinion.
    I'm currently studying law at Cambridge and absolutely hating my subject. If I'm honest with myself I think I worked out that it wasn't for me quite early on but only took action in the last couple of months. My supervisor and tutor have advised me to carry on until after exams and then see how I feel about changing subjects (this is what I originally planned on doing).
    I have always been very interested in psychology so have been considering changing either to PPS or to the new PBS course (it hasn't been made clear to me which one I'd move into next year, however much I've asked). However, to be able to do this, I need to get a 2.1 in my first year of Law. Although my supervisor has said I will get a 2.1 "unless there's any major disastors", I'm not confident that with the level of revision i've been doing (virtually none) I will be able to achieve that.
    I think the reason that I'm finding it so hard to revise is that I absolutely hate the subject. Constitutional law is bearable to me, but all of the other topics we are studying make me want to burst out in tears.

    A further concern, now that I've started to try and revise, is that maybe moving subjects isn't going to be the right thing for me either. Despite doing well at my a levels etc, I don't know if education is the thing for me. Exams are just my worst nightmare, and doing independent study is just something I can rarely bring myself to do.

    Socially, I am having an absolutely amazing time and this is what is posing the biggest problem for me. My friends are amazing, possibly some of the best friends I've ever had, and the thought of losing contact with them is almost unbearable. I know lots of people will be like "it's fine, they'll still be your friends' but I'm pretty much certain that that won't be the case in reality. We'll have less in common to talk about and I won't see them as often and I just kind of know that we won't be the friends we are now if I drop out. I also love all the social traditions at Cambridge. I organise most of the swaps for out drinking society and love the formals and everything and in some ways I know I would regret leaving, but in others it seems the only way forward.

    Just to make it clear, I have no aspirations of becoming a lawyer - that went completely out of the window once I'd started the degree.

    Does anyone have any advice on what my career prospects would be as a drop out? I've always been interested in marketing and/or working for somewhere like Deloitte or KPMG but I'm worried that they'll feel that I have a lack of motivation.

    If you were me, what would you do?
    1st year law is the worst for pretty much every law student. I'm not saying don't switch if you really hate it but thought I'd reassure you that even those who love their degree will realise it's the worst year (and I'm saying this as someone who thoroughly enjoyed doing law at Cambridge). Problem is that roman law is ... well, if you're interested in it, that's one thing. If you're expecting much use out of it in life then you need to master use of a time machine first. Tort's a very practical subject that is, unfortunately, a mess (it's a mess everywhere, not just at Cambridge). Criminal tends to get convoluted - if you're anything like me, you'll take one look at your paper and decide to skip any questions that have accessory liability involved on the basis that you never understood it in the first place and probably never will.
    Anyone who likes constitutional law is strange to my way of thinking but there you go. It remains my most hated paper in my degree. One of the happiest moments of my degree was closing that paper and walking out of the room, knowing I never had to do it again)

    If it helps, many people who dislike first year have found it more interesting when they get into revision. One of my friends hated first year but found it bearable when she revised and it all came together (she now really likes the degree but as I said, I'm not trying to convince you to stick with it. I know quite a few people who swapped after 1st/2nd year, after realising law wasn't for them, and are really happy with their decision)

    With regard to exams and independent study, have you thought about working with mates? In exam term, I had study sessions with my mates and that was great because we bounced ideas off each other and they'd always thought of things I hadn't and vice versa.

    As for the 2.1 thing, the important thing is to practice past paper questions and revise anything controversial and recent (within limits: I assume roman law hasn't changed?). It's still early days - don't you have about 6 weeks till exams? Trust me, that's plenty of time. I never remembered anything I revised before Easter term. I worked it out with someone and, in theory, for 5 subjects you need roughly 25-35 days. For first year, with roman law being relatively light, you could probably manage it in 18 - 25 days. (One full paper can be revised in 5-7 days. I know someone who got 67 on tort on 3 days revision. It was pretty impressive to watch)

    Can't help with the dropping out of uni part, only to say that, again, it's a surprisingly common feeling. Don't give up on Cambridge as a whole yet: I know one or two people who very nearly dropped out entirely and have said they're really glad they stuck it out instead.

    (If you're just thinking of switching subjects, really don't worry. People I know who did have stayed very close mates with the other law students)
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    (Original post by whatdoidoah)
    This could just be me having a late night breakdown but I can't sleep so I thought I may as well gain public opinion.
    I'm currently studying law at Cambridge and absolutely hating my subject. If I'm honest with myself I think I worked out that it wasn't for me quite early on but only took action in the last couple of months. My supervisor and tutor have advised me to carry on until after exams and then see how I feel about changing subjects (this is what I originally planned on doing).
    I have always been very interested in psychology so have been considering changing either to PPS or to the new PBS course (it hasn't been made clear to me which one I'd move into next year, however much I've asked). However, to be able to do this, I need to get a 2.1 in my first year of Law. Although my supervisor has said I will get a 2.1 "unless there's any major disastors", I'm not confident that with the level of revision i've been doing (virtually none) I will be able to achieve that.
    I think the reason that I'm finding it so hard to revise is that I absolutely hate the subject. Constitutional law is bearable to me, but all of the other topics we are studying make me want to burst out in tears.
    A further concern, now that I've started to try and revise, is that maybe moving subjects isn't going to be the right thing for me either. Despite doing well at my a levels etc, I don't know if education is the thing for me. Exams are just my worst nightmare, and doing independent study is just something I can rarely bring myself to do.
    Socially, I am having an absolutely amazing time and this is what is posing the biggest problem for me. My friends are amazing, possibly some of the best friends I've ever had, and the thought of losing contact with them is almost unbearable. I know lots of people will be like "it's fine, they'll still be your friends' but I'm pretty much certain that that won't be the case in reality. We'll have less in common to talk about and I won't see them as often and I just kind of know that we won't be the friends we are now if I drop out. I also love all the social traditions at Cambridge. I organise most of the swaps for out drinking society and love the formals and everything and in some ways I know I would regret leaving, but in others it seems the only way forward.
    Just to make it clear, I have no aspirations of becoming a lawyer - that went completely out of the window once I'd started the degree.
    Does anyone have any advice on what my career prospects would be as a drop out? I've always been interested in marketing and/or working for somewhere like Deloitte or KPMG but I'm worried that they'll feel that I have a lack of motivation.
    If you were me, what would you do?
    Hey! Sorry to hear you're feeling so blue! I'd say stick with it - just because I know that the Cambridge Law course offers a lot more flexibility in terms of module choice after the first year. Who knows, maybe you'll fall in love with an area of the law that you would never have discovered if you'd given it up.

    So give it some serious thought. You may well be suited to another course better, but either way, you're going to have to get that 2.1, right?

    I'm an Oxford Law reject myself, I've firmed UCL for Law with Hispanic Law, but I was contemplating reapplying because I never really considered Cambridge...if you don't mind me asking, do you think it'd be worth it? :/

    In any case, even if it's temporary salvation, I find a massive-as-**** bowl of pasta/curry or spending a fiver in Gregg's can cheer me up even when I'm tackling the most hideous piece of schoolwork
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    I think you should stick it out until exams. If you do well, you can think about switching subjects, if you don't do so well, don't worry about it, it's not the end of the world. I personally know a couple of people who dropped out of Cambridge half way through the year for various reasons, and went to UCL and Sheffield the following year. I also personally know a girl who failed her exams, and so wasn't allowed to continue with tripos. With the support of her college, she was able to secure a place at Nottingham that coming September (so she didn't have to take a year out), and started a new course there that she loved. She has since worked for Citibank.

    The worst case scenario will not be a bad one, so try to put it all out of your mind and force yourself to focus on revision. You can ponder all of this after May Week!
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    My son had a similar breakdown. Unfortunately he was studying law abroad and in another language which added to his workload/stress/pressure. He was advised to complete the first year of study as university's like to see exam results and complete academic years of study. He did his exams with a heavy heart, but did well enough, looked at everything differently afterwards and continued to study law. He has got a good training contract and found his niche in something that he is interested in. Unfortunately, in ALL subjects there are tedious areas that you are not interested in but are a necessary part of the training. Don't act in haste. Good luck and all the best with your decision.
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    I had broadly similar issues: I was studying history because I sort of enjoyed it but then for various reasons I degraded and ended up switching into music, which I always loved. I hated exams as a historian - you'll almost certainly get a 2.1 so that particular stress isn't especially high but at the same time the papers are hideously unpredictable and you could do loads of work only to find that you can't actually answer any of the questions (as happened to me in my first year with one of the papers - one of the biggest topics that they spent loads of lecture time on and which I was actually vaguely confident with just didn't come up).

    Switching to music was the best thing I ever did because for the first time at Cambridge I felt confident going into an exam. If your concern about staying at Cambridge is that you just don't do well in exams, regardless of the subject, then please trust me that in a subject you genuinely enjoy (and sometimes you need something like your experience with law to make you realise what you do enjoy) you will be able to work better throughout the year, during the revision period, and in the exams themselves. No-one actually enjoys exams, but they won't be the horror they once were, I promise.

    I think you'd really kick yourself if you left now. Do your best to make it through the law exams and keep talking to tutors and the like - it's what they're there for. Change subjects to something you enjoy more - in my experience, a joint honours degree opens more doors to you and allows you to show more about your abilities than a single honours, since it shows that you were good enough to do TWO things at Cambridge! Work will still feel horrible at times but mostly it will be much, much better. One of the other best things about changing was that I stopped feeling bad about admitting I didn't know something - I'd not studied music academically for a few years and I was going in at second-year level so it was OK not to pretend to have knowledge I didn't have. I don't know if that's how it would work out for you but it's a nice feeling anyway.

    So yeah, my advice would be - get yourself through the law exams, then change. Don't feel bad about it, see it as something exciting. Be realistic: no option will be perfect. Whatever you do, leaving Cambridge should be your last resort. You can always take a year or more out and come back later (I know plenty of people who have done that) but the danger is that the longer you spend away the more you start to believe that you can't do it when you almost certainly can. Cambridge has an amazing support system and you shouldn't feel bad about using it - you pay enough in fees, make your college and your university work for you!

    Best of luck.
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    Another reason for why you shouldn't lie in your personal statement.
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    try to make yourself like the subject. Look at important figures in history, interesting cases etc and as a reward, you can study phychology in year 2.
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    (Original post by whatdoidoah)
    This could just be me having a late night breakdown but I can't sleep so I thought I may as well gain public opinion.
    I'm currently studying law at Cambridge and absolutely hating my subject. If I'm honest with myself I think I worked out that it wasn't for me quite early on but only took action in the last couple of months. My supervisor and tutor have advised me to carry on until after exams and then see how I feel about changing subjects (this is what I originally planned on doing).
    I have always been very interested in psychology so have been considering changing either to PPS or to the new PBS course (it hasn't been made clear to me which one I'd move into next year, however much I've asked). However, to be able to do this, I need to get a 2.1 in my first year of Law. Although my supervisor has said I will get a 2.1 "unless there's any major disastors", I'm not confident that with the level of revision i've been doing (virtually none) I will be able to achieve that.
    I think the reason that I'm finding it so hard to revise is that I absolutely hate the subject. Constitutional law is bearable to me, but all of the other topics we are studying make me want to burst out in tears.
    A further concern, now that I've started to try and revise, is that maybe moving subjects isn't going to be the right thing for me either. Despite doing well at my a levels etc, I don't know if education is the thing for me. Exams are just my worst nightmare, and doing independent study is just something I can rarely bring myself to do.
    Socially, I am having an absolutely amazing time and this is what is posing the biggest problem for me. My friends are amazing, possibly some of the best friends I've ever had, and the thought of losing contact with them is almost unbearable. I know lots of people will be like "it's fine, they'll still be your friends' but I'm pretty much certain that that won't be the case in reality. We'll have less in common to talk about and I won't see them as often and I just kind of know that we won't be the friends we are now if I drop out. I also love all the social traditions at Cambridge. I organise most of the swaps for out drinking society and love the formals and everything and in some ways I know I would regret leaving, but in others it seems the only way forward.
    Just to make it clear, I have no aspirations of becoming a lawyer - that went completely out of the window once I'd started the degree.
    Does anyone have any advice on what my career prospects would be as a drop out? I've always been interested in marketing and/or working for somewhere like Deloitte or KPMG but I'm worried that they'll feel that I have a lack of motivation.
    If you were me, what would you do?
    Are your initials J.H.W by any chance?
 
 
 
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