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    hey,

    so im revising (well trying to) enzymes and have hit a 'brick wall' called cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups..

    im using 3 different textbooks but all are confusing me

    can anyone sum up in SIMPLE terms the 3 different aspects (cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups) cos im really stuck and my exam is very soon :/

    thanks in advance !
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    (Original post by ThePremierLeague)
    hey,

    so im revising (well trying to) enzymes and have hit a 'brick wall' called cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups..

    im using 3 different textbooks but all are confusing me

    can anyone sum up in SIMPLE terms the 3 different aspects (cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups) cos im really stuck and my exam is very soon :/

    thanks in advance !
    There is a thread for the F212 exam this summer, you might get more answers there. http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...%20june%202013

    Cofactors are a ions or small organic molecules required by enzymes to carry out reactions. They also accelerate the binding between the enzyme and substrate by changing the charge on the active site.
    Coenzymes are organic molecules which loosely bind to an enzyme during a reaction. Examples include coenzyme A and NADP.
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    (Original post by ThePremierLeague)
    hey,

    so im revising (well trying to) enzymes and have hit a 'brick wall' called cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups..

    im using 3 different textbooks but all are confusing me

    can anyone sum up in SIMPLE terms the 3 different aspects (cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups) cos im really stuck and my exam is very soon :/

    thanks in advance !

    Also, prosthetic groups can be described as non-amino acid 'additions' to the protein molecule, allowing it to carry out a particular function.

    In haemoglobin a prosthetic 'haem' group is made of iron ions (say that 10 times) which allows it to bind to O2.

    In enzymes, I would assume the prosthetic groups changes the shape of the enzymes to fit a specific substrate.

    Hope that helped :ahee:

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    (Original post by KanKan)
    Also, prosthetic groups can be described as non-amino acid 'additions' to the protein molecule, allowing it to carry out a particular function.

    In haemoglobin a prosthetic 'haem' group is made of iron ions (say that 10 times) which allows it to bind to O2.

    In enzymes, I would assume the prosthetic groups changes the shape of the enzymes to fit a specific substrate.

    Hope that helped :ahee:

    Posted from TSR Mobile

    thanks for reply,

    so are all aspects - cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups non-protein molecules?
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    (Original post by ThePremierLeague)
    thanks for reply,

    so are all aspects - cofactors, coenzymes and prosthetic groups non-protein molecules?
    Hmmm I would *asume* so. By non protein molecules I mean, molecules that are not amino acids. As those molecules would probably count as the actual protein/enzyme itself.

    That's just an assumption anyway, you should double check to be sure

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    (Original post by KanKan)
    Hmmm I would *asume* so. By non protein molecules I mean, molecules that are not amino acids. As those molecules would probably count as the actual protein/enzyme itself.

    That's just an assumption anyway, you should double check to be sure

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    hey thanks again,

    one last question -

    am i right in thinking that inorganic cofactors are still called cofactors, however organic cofactors are called coenzymes?

    thanks in advance
 
 
 
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